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Bohemia

BohemianCzechČechy
The Czech lands or the Bohemian lands (České země) are the three historical regions of Bohemia, Moravia, and Czech Silesia.
Bohemia (Čechy; ; Czechy; Bohemia) is the westernmost and largest historical region of the Czech lands in the present-day Czech Republic.

Moravia

MoravaMoravianMähren
The Czech lands or the Bohemian lands (České země) are the three historical regions of Bohemia, Moravia, and Czech Silesia.
Moravia (Morava; ; Morawy; Moravia) is a historical country in the Czech Republic (forming its eastern part) and one of the historical Czech lands, together with Bohemia and Czech Silesia.

Czech Silesia

SilesiaSilesianAustrian Silesia
The Czech lands or the Bohemian lands (České země) are the three historical regions of Bohemia, Moravia, and Czech Silesia.
While not today an administrative entity in itself, Czech Silesia is, together with Bohemia and Moravia, one of the three historical Czech lands.

Lands of the Bohemian Crown

Bohemian CrownBohemiaCrown of Bohemia
In a historical context, Czech texts use the term to refer to any territory ruled by the Kings of Bohemia, i.e., the lands of the Bohemian Crown (země Koruny české) as established by Emperor Charles IV in the 14th century.
The Lands of the Bohemian Crown, sometimes called Czech lands in modern times, were a number of incorporated states in Central Europe during the medieval and early modern periods connected by feudal relations under the Bohemian kings.

List of Bohemian monarchs

King of BohemiaDuke of BohemiaBohemia
In a historical context, Czech texts use the term to refer to any territory ruled by the Kings of Bohemia, i.e., the lands of the Bohemian Crown (země Koruny české) as established by Emperor Charles IV in the 14th century.
Following the dissolution of the monarchy, the Bohemian lands, now also referred to as Czech lands, became part of Czechoslovakia, and form today's Czech Republic (Czechia) since 1993.

Czech Republic

🇨🇿CzechCZE
Together the three have formed the Czech part of Czechoslovakia since 1918 and the Czech Republic since 1 January 1969, which became independent on 1 January 1993.
The population of the Czech lands declined by a third through the expulsion of Czech Protestants as well as due to the war, disease and famine.

Lusatia

Upper LusatiaLausitzUpper Lusatian
This would include territories like the Lusatias (which in 1635 fell to Saxony) and the whole of Silesia, all ruled from Prague Castle at that time.
Being part of the Lands of the Bohemian Crown (the so-called Czech Lands) for three hundred years, alongside them it passed to the Habsburg Monarchy and from it to the Electorate of Saxony.

Czechoslovakia

CzechoslovakCzechTCH
Together the three have formed the Czech part of Czechoslovakia since 1918 and the Czech Republic since 1 January 1969, which became independent on 1 January 1993.
In the 1946 parliamentary election, the Communist Party of Czechoslovakia was the winner in the Czech lands, and the Democratic Party won in Slovakia.

Sudeten Germans

Sudeten GermanGermanEthnic German
From the second part of the 13th century onwards, German colonists ("German Bohemians") settled in the mountainous border area on the basis of the kings' invitation during the Ostsiedlung (in Prague they lived already from the early 12th century) and lived alongside the Slavs.
These names were derived from the Sudeten Mountains, which form the northern border of the Bohemian lands.

History of Poland during the Piast dynasty

PolishPolandfragmentation of Poland
While Bohemia rose to a kingdom, the Silesian Piasts alienated from the fragmenting Kingdom of Poland.
After the addition of Lesser Poland, the country of the Vistulans, and of Silesia (both taken by Mieszko from the Czech state during the later part of the 10th century), Mieszko's state reached its mature form, including the main regions regarded as ethnically Polish.

Protectorate of Bohemia and Moravia

Bohemia and MoraviaProtectorateCzech Protectorate
*Protectorate of Bohemia and Moravia
Earlier, following the Munich Agreement of September 1938, Nazi Germany had incorporated the Czech Sudetenland territory as a Reichsgau (October 1938).

Thirty Years' War

30 Years War30 Years' WarThirty Years War
In 1367 Emperor Charles IV also purchased the former March of Lusatia (Lower Lusatia) in the northwest, however, during the Thirty Years' War both Lusatias passed to the Electorate of Saxony by the Peace of Prague.
The population of the Czech lands declined by a third due to war, disease, famine, and the expulsion of Protestant population.

Historical region

traditional regionhistoricalhistoric region
The Czech lands or the Bohemian lands (České země) are the three historical regions of Bohemia, Moravia, and Czech Silesia.

Charles IV, Holy Roman Emperor

Charles IVEmperor Charles IVCharles IV of Luxembourg
In a historical context, Czech texts use the term to refer to any territory ruled by the Kings of Bohemia, i.e., the lands of the Bohemian Crown (země Koruny české) as established by Emperor Charles IV in the 14th century.

Electorate of Saxony

SaxonySaxonElector of Saxony
This would include territories like the Lusatias (which in 1635 fell to Saxony) and the whole of Silesia, all ruled from Prague Castle at that time.

Silesia

ŚląskSilesianSchlesien
This would include territories like the Lusatias (which in 1635 fell to Saxony) and the whole of Silesia, all ruled from Prague Castle at that time.

Prague Castle

PragueCastle of Praguecastle
This would include territories like the Lusatias (which in 1635 fell to Saxony) and the whole of Silesia, all ruled from Prague Castle at that time.

Kingdom of Prussia

PrussiaPrussianPrussians
After the conquest of Silesia by the Prussian king Frederick the Great in 1742, the remaining lands of the Bohemian Crown—Bohemia, Moravia and Austrian Silesia—have been more or less co-extensive with the territory of the modern-day Czech Republic.

Frederick the Great

Frederick IIFrederick II of PrussiaFrederick
After the conquest of Silesia by the Prussian king Frederick the Great in 1742, the remaining lands of the Bohemian Crown—Bohemia, Moravia and Austrian Silesia—have been more or less co-extensive with the territory of the modern-day Czech Republic.

Austrian Silesia

SilesiaUpper and Lower SilesiaDuchy of Upper and Lower Silesia
After the conquest of Silesia by the Prussian king Frederick the Great in 1742, the remaining lands of the Bohemian Crown—Bohemia, Moravia and Austrian Silesia—have been more or less co-extensive with the territory of the modern-day Czech Republic.

Slovakia

🇸🇰SlovakSVK
During the period of the First and Second Czechoslovak Republic the Czech lands were frequently referred to as Historical lands in particular when mentioned together with Slovakia (which was never an autonomous historical region within the Kingdom of Hungary).

Kingdom of Hungary

HungaryHungarianHungarians
During the period of the First and Second Czechoslovak Republic the Czech lands were frequently referred to as Historical lands in particular when mentioned together with Slovakia (which was never an autonomous historical region within the Kingdom of Hungary).

Boii

BoianBoioCelts
The Bohemian lands had been settled by Celts (Boii) from 5th BC until 2nd AD, then by various Germanic tribes (Marcomanni, Quadi, Lombards and others) until they moved on to the west during the Migration Period (1st-5th century).

Marcomanni

MarcomaniiMarcomannic federation
The Bohemian lands had been settled by Celts (Boii) from 5th BC until 2nd AD, then by various Germanic tribes (Marcomanni, Quadi, Lombards and others) until they moved on to the west during the Migration Period (1st-5th century).

Quadi

Gabinius
The Bohemian lands had been settled by Celts (Boii) from 5th BC until 2nd AD, then by various Germanic tribes (Marcomanni, Quadi, Lombards and others) until they moved on to the west during the Migration Period (1st-5th century).