Czechoslovak government-in-exile

CzechoslovakiaCzechoslovakgovernment-in-exileFree CzechoslovakCzechoslovak National Liberation CommitteeFree Czechoslovak ForcesCzechoslovak government in exileCzechoslovak governmentsexiled Czechoslovak governmentFree Czechoslovaks
The Czechoslovak government-in-exile, sometimes styled officially as the Provisional Government of Czechoslovakia (Czech: Prozatímní státní zřízení československé), was an informal title conferred upon the Czechoslovak National Liberation Committee, initially by British diplomatic recognition.wikipedia
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Edvard Beneš

BenešPresident BenešBeneš, Edvard
The name came to be used by other World War II Allies as they subsequently recognised it. The Committee was originally created by the former Czechoslovak President, Edvard Beneš in Paris, France, in October 1939. Seeing the end of the Republic as a fait accompli, Edvard Beneš resigned as president of the First Czechoslovak Republic one week after the Munich Agreement ceded the Sudetenland to Nazi Germany.
His first resignation came after the German occupation of Czechoslovakia in 1938 which brought his government into exile, and the second came about with the 1948 communist coup.

Munich Agreement

Munich CrisisMunichMunich Conference
A specifically anti-Fascist government, it sought to reverse the Munich Agreement and the subsequent German occupation of Czechoslovakia, and to return the Republic to its 1937 boundaries. The success of this mission, Operation Anthropoid, caused Britain and Free France (itself a government-in-exile) to formally repudiate the Munich Agreement, thus conferring de jure legitimacy on the Beneš government as the continuation of the First Republic. Seeing the end of the Republic as a fait accompli, Edvard Beneš resigned as president of the First Czechoslovak Republic one week after the Munich Agreement ceded the Sudetenland to Nazi Germany.
Relying on the Convention for the Definition of Aggression, Czechoslovak president Edvard Beneš and the government-in-exile later regarded 17 September 1938 as the beginning of the undeclared German-Czechoslovak war.

Allies of World War II

AlliedAlliesAllied forces
The name came to be used by other World War II Allies as they subsequently recognised it. The Committee was originally created by the former Czechoslovak President, Edvard Beneš in Paris, France, in October 1939.
The Czechoslovak government-in-exile joined the Allies, the occupation and partition of Czechoslovakia amongst the Axis powers was not accepted by the Allied powers.

Operation Anthropoid

assassination of Reinhard Heydrichassassinationassassinated
The success of this mission, Operation Anthropoid, caused Britain and Free France (itself a government-in-exile) to formally repudiate the Munich Agreement, thus conferring de jure legitimacy on the Beneš government as the continuation of the First Republic.
The Czechoslovaks undertook the operation to help confer legitimacy on Edvard Beneš's government-in-exile in London, as well as for retribution for Heydrich's brutally efficient rule.

Reinhard Heydrich

HeydrichR. HeydrichReinhard Tristan Eugen Heydrich
Following almost six months of planning behind enemy lines, Czechoslovak Allied operatives in Bohemia fatally wounded Reinhard Heydrich, the dictator at the head of the Protectorate of Bohemia and Moravia.
He was ambushed by a team of Czech and Slovak agents who had been sent by the Czechoslovak government-in-exile to kill the Reich-Protector; the team was trained by the British Special Operations Executive.

Beneš decrees

Beneš decreeDecreesBeneš decrets
The Government-in-Exile promulgated a series of laws that are now referred to as the "Beneš decrees".
The Decrees of the President of the Republic (, Dekréty prezidenta republiky) and the Constitutional Decrees of the President of the Republic (, Ústavné dekréty prezidenta republiky), commonly known as the Beneš decrees, were a series of laws drafted by the Czechoslovak government-in-exile in the absence of the Czechoslovak parliament during the German occupation of Czechoslovakia in World War II.

Expulsion of Germans from Czechoslovakia

expelledexpulsion of Germansexpelled from Czechoslovakia
One part of these decrees dealt with the status of ethnic Germans and Hungarians in postwar Czechoslovakia, including the confiscation of their property, anticipating their future deportation (see expulsion of Germans from Czechoslovakia, and Hungarians in Slovakia).
The decision to deport the Germans was adopted by the Czechoslovak Government-in-Exile which, beginning in 1943, sought the support of the Allies for this proposal.

Czechoslovak Army

ArmyCzechoslovakarmed forces
However, as Beneš was the key to getting military support from the well-trained Czechoslovak army, France was in fact the first nation to conclude a treaty with the Committee.
During World War II the Czechoslovak Army was recreated in exile, first in the form of the new Czechoslovak Legion fighting alongside of Poland during the Invasion of Poland and then in the form of forces loyal to the London-based Czechoslovak government-in-exile.

Protectorate of Bohemia and Moravia

Bohemia and MoraviaProtectorateCzech Protectorate
Following almost six months of planning behind enemy lines, Czechoslovak Allied operatives in Bohemia fatally wounded Reinhard Heydrich, the dictator at the head of the Protectorate of Bohemia and Moravia.
Because of his contacts with the Czechoslovak Government-in-Exile Eliáš was sentenced to death, and the execution was carried out on 19 June 1942 shortly after Heydrich's own death.

Jan Šrámek

Jan Šrámek(21 July 1940 – 5 April 1945)
Jan Šrámek (11 August 1870, Grygov, Margraviate of Moravia – 22 April 1956, Prague) was Prime Minister of the Czechoslovak government-in-exile from 21 July 1940 to 5 April 1945.

Battle of France

fall of FranceFranceinvasion of France
Ultimately, units of the First Division of the Czechoslovak Army fought alongside their hosts in the final stages of the Battle of France.

German occupation of Czechoslovakia

occupation of CzechoslovakiaGerman occupationNazi occupation
A specifically anti-Fascist government, it sought to reverse the Munich Agreement and the subsequent German occupation of Czechoslovakia, and to return the Republic to its 1937 boundaries. It was the legitimate government for Czechoslovakia throughout the Second World War.
Following the outbreak of World War II, he would form a Czechoslovak government-in-exile in London.

Government in exile

government-in-exileexile governmentin exile
It was in fact France itself that proved the greatest obstacle to accepting the Committee as a full government-in-exile.

Government of the United Kingdom

British governmentgovernmentUK Government
The Czechoslovak government-in-exile, sometimes styled officially as the Provisional Government of Czechoslovakia (Czech: Prozatímní státní zřízení československé), was an informal title conferred upon the Czechoslovak National Liberation Committee, initially by British diplomatic recognition.

Diplomatic recognition

recognizedrecognitioninternational recognition
The Czechoslovak government-in-exile, sometimes styled officially as the Provisional Government of Czechoslovakia (Czech: Prozatímní státní zřízení československé), was an informal title conferred upon the Czechoslovak National Liberation Committee, initially by British diplomatic recognition.

The Chainsmokers

Paris, FranceParisCity of Paris
The name came to be used by other World War II Allies as they subsequently recognised it. The Committee was originally created by the former Czechoslovak President, Edvard Beneš in Paris, France, in October 1939.

German military administration in occupied France during World War II

occupied FranceGerman occupation of FranceGerman occupation
Unsuccessful negotiations with France for diplomatic status, as well as the impending Nazi occupation of France, forced the Committee to withdraw to London in 1940.

London

London, EnglandLondon, UKLondon, United Kingdom
Unsuccessful negotiations with France for diplomatic status, as well as the impending Nazi occupation of France, forced the Committee to withdraw to London in 1940.

First Czechoslovak Republic

CzechoslovakiaCzechoslovak RepublicCzechoslovak
As such it was ultimately considered, by those countries that recognised it, the legal continuation of the First Republic of Czechoslovakia. Seeing the end of the Republic as a fait accompli, Edvard Beneš resigned as president of the First Czechoslovak Republic one week after the Munich Agreement ceded the Sudetenland to Nazi Germany.

Sudetenland

SudetenSudeten crisisSudeten Germans
Seeing the end of the Republic as a fait accompli, Edvard Beneš resigned as president of the First Czechoslovak Republic one week after the Munich Agreement ceded the Sudetenland to Nazi Germany.

Nazi Germany

GermanGermanyNazi
Seeing the end of the Republic as a fait accompli, Edvard Beneš resigned as president of the First Czechoslovak Republic one week after the Munich Agreement ceded the Sudetenland to Nazi Germany.

University of Chicago

Chicagothe University of ChicagoChicago University
On 15 February 1939, he arrived in Chicago; he became visiting professor at the University of Chicago, where he took refuge in the same community that had once buoyed his predecessor and friend, Tomáš Masaryk.

Tomáš Garrigue Masaryk

MasarykTomáš MasarykT. G. Masaryk
On 15 February 1939, he arrived in Chicago; he became visiting professor at the University of Chicago, where he took refuge in the same community that had once buoyed his predecessor and friend, Tomáš Masaryk.

World War II

Second World WarwarWWII
It was the legitimate government for Czechoslovakia throughout the Second World War.

Édouard Daladier

Daladier DaladierDaladier government
The government of Édouard Daladier was ambivalent towards the ambitions of the Committee and of Czechoslovakia in general.