Czechs

CzechBohemianCzech peopleCzech descentCzech RepublicCzech nationCzech societyCzechoslovakethnic CzechCzech volunteers
The Czechs (Češi, ; singular masculine: Čech, singular feminine: Češka ) or the Czech people (Český národ), are a West Slavic ethnic group and a nation native to the Czech Republic in Central Europe, who share a common ancestry, culture, history, and Czech language.wikipedia
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West Slavs

West SlavicWestern SlavicSlavic
The Czechs (Češi, ; singular masculine: Čech, singular feminine: Češka ) or the Czech people (Český národ), are a West Slavic ethnic group and a nation native to the Czech Republic in Central Europe, who share a common ancestry, culture, history, and Czech language.
West Slavic speaking nations today include the Czechs, Poles, Slovaks, Sorbs and ethnic groups Kashubians, Moravians and Silesians.

Great Moravia

MoraviaMoraviansGreat Moravian Empire
During the Migration Period, West Slavic tribes of Bohemians settled in the area, "assimilated the remaining Celtic and Germanic populations", and formed a principality in the 9th century, which was part of Great Moravia, in form of Duchy of Bohemia and later Kingdom of Bohemia, the predecessors of the modern republic.
The only formation preceding it in these territories was Samo's Empire known from between 631 and 658 AD. Great Moravia was thus the first joint state of the Slavonic tribes that became later known as Czechs and Slovaks and that later formed Czechoslovakia.

Duchy of Bohemia

BohemiaBohemianDuchy
During the Migration Period, West Slavic tribes of Bohemians settled in the area, "assimilated the remaining Celtic and Germanic populations", and formed a principality in the 9th century, which was part of Great Moravia, in form of Duchy of Bohemia and later Kingdom of Bohemia, the predecessors of the modern republic. They formed a principality in the 9th century, the Duchy of Bohemia, under the Přemyslid dynasty which was part of the Great Moravia under Svatopluk I. According to mythology, the founding father of the Czech people were Forefather Čech, who according to legend brought the tribe of Czechs into its land.
It was formed around 870 by Czechs as part of the Great Moravian realm.

Czech Brazilians

CzechBrazilCzech Republic
The Czech diaspora is found in notable numbers in the United States, Canada, Israel, Austria, Germany, Slovakia, Switzerland, Italy, the United Kingdom, Australia, Russia, Argentina and Brazil, among others.
Czech Brazilians refer to Brazilians of Czech descent who were born in or who trace their ancestry to the territory of the historic Czech lands or succession states, now known as the Czech Republic, and are residents and/or citizens of Brazil.

Lech, Czech, and Rus

LechČechRus
They formed a principality in the 9th century, the Duchy of Bohemia, under the Přemyslid dynasty which was part of the Great Moravia under Svatopluk I. According to mythology, the founding father of the Czech people were Forefather Čech, who according to legend brought the tribe of Czechs into its land. According to a popular myth, the Slavs came with Forefather Čech who settled at the Říp Mountain.
Lech, Czech and Rus refers to a founding myth of three Slavic peoples: the Poles (or Lechites), the Czechs, and the Rus' people.

Slavs

SlavicSlavSlavonic
The population of the Czech Republic descends from diverse peoples of Slavic, Celtic and Germanic origin.
Present-day Slavic people are classified into East Slavs (chiefly Belarusians, Russians, Rusyns, and Ukrainians), West Slavs (chiefly Czechs, Kashubs, Moravians, Poles, Silesians, Slovaks and Sorbs), and South Slavs (chiefly Bosniaks, Bulgarians, Croats, Macedonians, Gorani, Pomaks, Montenegrins, Serbs and Slovenes).

Moravia

MoravaMoravianMähren
Slavs settled in Bohemia, Moravia and Austria sometime during the 6th or 7th centuries, and "assimilated the remaining Celtic and Germanic populations".
The people are historically named Moravians, a subgroup of Czechs (as understood by Czechs).

Říp Mountain

Říphistorical mountain Rip
According to a popular myth, the Slavs came with Forefather Čech who settled at the Říp Mountain.
Říp Mountain (hora Říp, ; [Sankt] Georgsberg or Raudnitzer Berg), also known as Říp Hill, is a 459 m solitary hill rising up from the central Bohemian flatland where, according to legend, the first Czechs settled.

Czech diaspora

CzechCzech émigréCzechs
The Czech diaspora is found in notable numbers in the United States, Canada, Israel, Austria, Germany, Slovakia, Switzerland, Italy, the United Kingdom, Australia, Russia, Argentina and Brazil, among others.
The country with the largest number of Czechs living abroad is the United States.

Czechoslovak Legion

Czech LegionCzechoslovaksCzechoslovak Army
During World War I, Czechoslovak Legions fought in France, Italy and Russia against the Central Powers and in 1918 was proclaimed independent Czechoslovakia.
The Czechoslovak Legion (Československé legie in Czech and Československé légie in Slovak) were volunteer armed forces composed predominantly of Czechs with a small number of Slovaks (approximately 8 percent) fighting together with the Entente powers during World War I.

Emil Hácha

HachaHáchapresident Hácha
However, in 1938 the Munich Agreement severed the Sudetenland, with a considerable Czech minority, from Czechoslovakia, and in 1939 the German Nazi regime established the Protectorate of Bohemia and Moravia for Resttschechei (the rump Czech state ). Emil Hácha became president of the protectorate under Nazi domination, which only allowed pro-Nazi Czech associations and tended to stress ties of the Czechs with the Bohemian Germans and other parts of the German people, in order to facilitate assimilation by Germanization.
Emil Dominik Josef Hácha (12 July 1872 – 27 June 1945) was a Czech lawyer, the third President of Czechoslovakia from 1938 to 1939.

Prague

PrahaPrague, Czech RepublicPrag
In 880, Prague Castle was constructed by Prince Bořivoj, founder of the Přemyslid dynasty and the city of Prague was established.
In the following three centuries, the Czech tribes built several fortified settlements in the area, most notably in the Šárka valley, Butovice and Levý Hradec.

Protectorate of Bohemia and Moravia

Bohemia and MoraviaProtectorateCzech Protectorate
However, in 1938 the Munich Agreement severed the Sudetenland, with a considerable Czech minority, from Czechoslovakia, and in 1939 the German Nazi regime established the Protectorate of Bohemia and Moravia for Resttschechei (the rump Czech state ). Emil Hácha became president of the protectorate under Nazi domination, which only allowed pro-Nazi Czech associations and tended to stress ties of the Czechs with the Bohemian Germans and other parts of the German people, in order to facilitate assimilation by Germanization.
The protectorate's population was majority ethnic Czech, while the Sudetenland was majority ethnic German.

Bohemia

BohemianCzechČechy
Slavs settled in Bohemia, Moravia and Austria sometime during the 6th or 7th centuries, and "assimilated the remaining Celtic and Germanic populations". Ethnic Czechs were called Bohemians in English until the early 20th century, referring to the medieval land of Bohemia which in turn was adapted from late Iron Age tribe of Celtic Boii.
The Czech name "Čechy" is derived from the name of the Slavic ethnic group, the Czechs, who settled in the area during the 6th or 7th century AD.

Bohemian

bohemiansCzechancestry
The Czechs (Češi, ; singular masculine: Čech, singular feminine: Češka ) or the Czech people (Český národ), are a West Slavic ethnic group and a nation native to the Czech Republic in Central Europe, who share a common ancestry, culture, history, and Czech language.
In English, the word "Bohemian" was used to denote the Czech people as well as the Czech language before the word "Czech" became prevalent in the early 20th century.

Jan Žižka

ŽižkaJan Žižka of TrocnovJan Žižka z Trocnova
Jan Žižka and Prokop the Great were leaders of hussite army, George of Poděbrady was a hussite king.
undefined 1360 – 11 October 1424) was a Czech general, a contemporary and follower of Jan Hus, Hussite military leader, and later also a Radical Hussite who led the Taborites.

Jan Hus

HusJohn HussHussites
Jan Hus was a religious reformist from the 15th century and spiritual father of the Hussite Movement.
1369 – 6 July, 1415), sometimes Anglicized as John Hus or John Huss, also referred to in historical texts as Iohannes Hus or Johannes Huss) was a Czech theologian, philosopher, master, dean, and rector of the Charles University in Prague who became a church reformer, an inspirer of Hussitism, a key predecessor to Protestantism and a seminal figure in the Bohemian Reformation.

Joseph Radetzky von Radetz

RadetzkyJoseph RadetzkyGeneral Radetzky
Joseph Radetzky von Radetz was an Austrian general staff during the later period of the Napoleonic Wars.
Johann Josef Wenzel Anton Franz Karl, Graf Radetzky von Radetz (John Joseph Wenceslaus Anthony Francis Charles, Count Radetzky of Radetz; ; Janez Jožef Vencelj Anton Frančišek Karel grof Radetzky; 2 November 1766 – 5 January 1858) was a Czech nobleman and field marshal, a member of House of Radetzky in the Kingdom of Bohemia.

Tomáš Garrigue Masaryk

MasarykTomáš MasarykT. G. Masaryk
One of the most notable figures are founders of Czechoslovakia, modern state of independence of Czech and Slovak nations, Presidents Tomáš Garrigue Masaryk and Edvard Beneš, who was also leader of exile government in World War II.
Tomáš Garrigue Masaryk, sometimes anglicised to Thomas Masaryk (7 March 1850 – 14 September 1937), was a Czechoslovak politician, statesman, sociologist and philosopher.

Czechoslovakia

CzechoslovakCzechTCH
During World War I, Czechoslovak Legions fought in France, Italy and Russia against the Central Powers and in 1918 was proclaimed independent Czechoslovakia. The Czech are closely related to the neighbouring Slovaks (with whom they constituted Czechoslovakia 1918–1993).
The roots of Czech nationalism go back to the 19th century, when philologists and educators, influenced by Romanticism, promoted the Czech language and pride in the Czech people.

František Palacký

PalackýFrantiška Palackého
The first modern Czech politician was František Palacký, often called "father of nation".
František Palacký (14 June 1798 – 26 May 1876) was a Czech historian and politician, the most influential person of the Czech National Revival, called "Father of the Nation".

Defenestrations of Prague

Defenestration of PragueSecond Defenestration of PragueDefenestration
Defenestrations of Prague in 1618, signaled an open revolt by the Bohemian estates against the Habsburgs and started the Thirty Years' War.
The First Defenestration of Prague involved the killing of seven members of the city council by a crowd of Czech Hussites on 30 July 1419.

Václav Havel

Vaclav HavelHavelPresident Havel
Another notable politician after the fall of the communist regime is Václav Havel, last President of Czechoslovakia and first President of the Czech Republic.
Václav Havel (5 October 1936 – 18 December 2011) was a Czech statesman, writer and former dissident, who served as the last President of Czechoslovakia from 1989 until the dissolution of Czechoslovakia in 1992 and then as the first President of the Czech Republic from 1993 to 2003.

Resistance in the Protectorate of Bohemia and Moravia

Czech resistanceResistanceresistance movement
The post-war expulsion of Germans from Czechoslovakia and the immediate reprisals against Germans and Nazi collaborators by Czech resistance and the Czechoslovak state authorities, made Czechs—especially in the early 1950s—settle alongside Slovaks and Romani people in the former lands of the Sudeten Germans, who had been deported to East Germany, West Germany and Austria according to the Potsdam Conference and Yalta Conference.
In the early days of the war, the Czech population participated in boycotts of public transport and large-scale demonstrations.

Banat

BanatianRomanian BanatSerbian Banat
Tens of thousands of Czechs had repatriated from Volhynia and Banat after World War II. Since the 1990s, the Czech Republic has been working to repatriate Romania and Kazakhstan's ethnic Czechs.
The region of Banat is populated by ethnic Romanians, Serbs, Hungarians, Germans, Krashovani, Ukrainians, Slovaks, Bulgarians, Czechs, Croats, Jews, Romani and other ethnicities.