DSM-5

Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disordersmental health disordersDSM-VDiagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders'', Fifth EditionDiagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition5th editionDSMDiagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM-5)Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5)Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (Fifth Edition, DSM-5)
The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5) is the 2013 update to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, the taxonomic and diagnostic tool published by the American Psychiatric Association (APA).wikipedia
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Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders

DSMDSM-IVDSM-IV-TR
The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5) is the 2013 update to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, the taxonomic and diagnostic tool published by the American Psychiatric Association (APA).
The DSM is in its fifth edition, the DSM-5, published on May 18, 2013.

Autism spectrum

autism spectrum disorderautisticautism spectrum disorders
Notable changes in the DSM-5 include the reconceptualization of Asperger syndrome from a distinct disorder to an autism spectrum disorder; the elimination of subtypes of schizophrenia; the deletion of the "bereavement exclusion" for depressive disorders; the renaming of gender identity disorder to gender dysphoria, along with a revised treatment plan; the inclusion of binge eating disorder as a discrete eating disorder; the renaming and reconceptualization of paraphilias to paraphilic disorders; the removal of the axis system; and the splitting of disorders not otherwise specified into other specified disorders and unspecified disorders. Autism spectrum disorder incorporates Asperger disorder, childhood disintegrative disorder, and pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specified (PDD-NOS)—see.
The DSM-5 redefined the autism spectrum disorders to encompass the previous diagnoses of autism, Asperger syndrome, pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specified (PDD-NOS), and childhood disintegrative disorder.

Binge eating disorder

binge eatingbinge-eating disorderBinge Eating Disorder (BED)
Notable changes in the DSM-5 include the reconceptualization of Asperger syndrome from a distinct disorder to an autism spectrum disorder; the elimination of subtypes of schizophrenia; the deletion of the "bereavement exclusion" for depressive disorders; the renaming of gender identity disorder to gender dysphoria, along with a revised treatment plan; the inclusion of binge eating disorder as a discrete eating disorder; the renaming and reconceptualization of paraphilias to paraphilic disorders; the removal of the axis system; and the splitting of disorders not otherwise specified into other specified disorders and unspecified disorders.
Previously considered a topic for further research exploration, binge eating disorder was included in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders in 2013.

Asperger syndrome

Asperger's syndromeAspergerAspergers syndrome
Notable changes in the DSM-5 include the reconceptualization of Asperger syndrome from a distinct disorder to an autism spectrum disorder; the elimination of subtypes of schizophrenia; the deletion of the "bereavement exclusion" for depressive disorders; the renaming of gender identity disorder to gender dysphoria, along with a revised treatment plan; the inclusion of binge eating disorder as a discrete eating disorder; the renaming and reconceptualization of paraphilias to paraphilic disorders; the removal of the axis system; and the splitting of disorders not otherwise specified into other specified disorders and unspecified disorders. Autism spectrum disorder incorporates Asperger disorder, childhood disintegrative disorder, and pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specified (PDD-NOS)—see.
In the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5), published in May 2013, AS, as a separate diagnosis, was eliminated and folded into autism spectrum disorder.

Tourette syndrome

Tourette's syndromeTourettetourettes
A new sub-category, motor disorders, encompasses developmental coordination disorder, stereotypic movement disorder, and the tic disorders including Tourette syndrome.
The fifth version of the DSM (DSM-5), published in May 2013, reclassified Tourette's and tic disorders as motor disorders listed in the neurodevelopmental disorder category, and replaced transient tic disorder with provisional tic disorder, but made few other significant changes.

Communication disorder

communication disordersDisorderslanguage deficits
Phonological disorder and stuttering are now called communication disorders—which include language disorder, speech sound disorder, childhood-onset fluency disorder, and a new condition characterized by impaired social verbal and nonverbal communication called social (pragmatic) communication disorder.
The DSM-5 diagnoses for communication disorders completely rework the ones stated above.

Disorganized schizophrenia

hebephreniahebephrenicdisorganized
All subtypes of schizophrenia were removed from the DSM-5 (paranoid, disorganized, catatonic, undifferentiated, and residual).
Disorganized schizophrenia, also known as hebephrenia or hebephrenic schizophrenia, is a subtype of schizophrenia, although it is not recognized in the latest version of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders.

Schizoaffective disorder

schizoaffectiveschizo-affective disorderschizoaffective disorders
A major mood episode is required for schizoaffective disorder (for a majority of the disorder's duration after criterion A [related to delusions, hallucinations, disorganized speech or behavior, and negative symptoms such as avolition] is met).
The DSM-5 criteria revision for schizoaffective disorder is mainly an attempt to reduce the significant problems with misdiagnosis; but whether this has been achieved awaits outcome studies which have not been completed yet.

Stereotypic movement disorder

repeated banging of the headStereotyped movement disordersstereotyped movements
A new sub-category, motor disorders, encompasses developmental coordination disorder, stereotypic movement disorder, and the tic disorders including Tourette syndrome.
Stereotypic movement disorder is classified in the fifth revision of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) as a motor disorder, in the category of neurodevelopmental disorders.

Childhood disintegrative disorder

Childhood disintegrative disorder (CDD)dementia infantilisDisintegrative psychosis
Autism spectrum disorder incorporates Asperger disorder, childhood disintegrative disorder, and pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specified (PDD-NOS)—see.
In May 2013, the term CDD, along with other types of autism, was fused into a single diagnostic term called "autism spectrum disorder" under the new DSM-5 manual.

Agoraphobia

agoraphobicagoraphobea fear of crowds
Panic disorder and agoraphobia became two separate disorders.
In the DSM-5 agoraphobia is classified as a phobia along with specific phobias and social phobia.

Excoriation disorder

dermatillomaniaskin pickingskin-picking
A new chapter on obsessive-compulsive and related disorders includes four new disorders: excoriation (skin-picking) disorder, hoarding disorder, substance-/medication-induced obsessive-compulsive and related disorder, and obsessive-compulsive and related disorder due to another medical condition.
Since the DSM-5 (2013), excoriation disorder is classified as "L98.1 Excoriation (skin-picking) disorder" in ICD-10; and is no longer classified in "Impulse control disorder" (f63)".

Paranoid schizophrenia

paranoid schizophrenicparanoidparanoid schizophrenics
All subtypes of schizophrenia were removed from the DSM-5 (paranoid, disorganized, catatonic, undifferentiated, and residual).
Paranoid schizophrenia is defined in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th Edition, but it was dropped from the 5th Edition.

Dysthymia

chronic depressiondysthymic disorderdysthymic
The term dysthymia now also would be called persistent depressive disorder.
In the DSM-5, dysthymia is replaced by persistent depressive disorder.

Catatonia

catatoniccatatonic statecatatonic schizophrenia
All subtypes of schizophrenia were removed from the DSM-5 (paranoid, disorganized, catatonic, undifferentiated, and residual).
In the fifth edition of the DSM, it is written that a variety of medical conditions may cause catatonia, especially neurological conditions: encephalitis, cerebrovascular disease, neoplasms, head injury.

Tic disorder

tic disorderstics
A new sub-category, motor disorders, encompasses developmental coordination disorder, stereotypic movement disorder, and the tic disorders including Tourette syndrome.
DSM-5 was published in 2013, updating DSM-IV-TR, which was published in 2000.

Pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specified

PDD-NOSatypical autismPervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specified (PDD-NOS)
Autism spectrum disorder incorporates Asperger disorder, childhood disintegrative disorder, and pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specified (PDD-NOS)—see.
It is no longer included as an option for an Autism Spectrum Disorder and is not part of the DSM-5, but is included in the ICD-10.

Premenstrual dysphoric disorder

dysphoric disorderpremenstrual mood disorders
Premenstrual dysphoric disorder moved from an appendix for further study, and became a disorder.
Authoritative diagnostic criteria for PMDD are provided by a number of expert medical guides, notably the DSM-5 which established seven criteria (A through G) for the diagnosis of PMDD.

Separation anxiety disorder

separation anxietyanxiety, separationanxious when separated
Separation anxiety disorder and selective mutism are now classified as anxiety disorders (rather than disorders of early onset).
The duration of this problem must persist for at least four weeks and must present itself before a child is eighteen years of age to be diagnosed as SAD in children, but can now be diagnosed in adults with a duration typically lasting six months in adults as specified by the DSM-5.

Reactive attachment disorder

RADReactive Attachment Disorder (RAD)
Two new disorders that were formerly subtypes were named: reactive attachment disorder and disinhibited social engagement disorder.
Due to recent revision in the DSM-5 the "disinhibited form" is now considered a separate diagnosis named "disinhibited attachment disorder".

Body dysmorphic disorder

body dysmorphiadysmorphophobiaAddicted to surgery
A specifier was expanded (and added to body dysmorphic disorder and hoarding disorder) to allow for good or fair insight, poor insight, and "absent insight/delusional" (i.e., complete conviction that obsessive-compulsive disorder beliefs are true).
The DSM-5 categorizes BDD in the obsessive–compulsive spectrum, and distinguishes it from anorexia nervosa.

Phobia

phobiasphobicfear
For the various forms of phobias and anxiety disorders, DSM-5 removes the requirement that the subject (formerly, over 18 years old) "must recognize that their fear and anxiety are excessive or unreasonable". Also, the duration of at least 6 months now applies to everyone (not only to children).
Most phobias are classified into three categories and, according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-V), such phobias are considered sub-types of anxiety disorder.

Disruptive mood dysregulation disorder

New disruptive mood dysregulation disorder (DMDD) for children up to age 18 years.
DMDD first appeared as a disorder in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5) in 2013 and is classified as a mood disorder.

Depersonalization disorder

depersonalisation disorderdepersonalization syndromedepersonalization-derealization disorder
Depersonalization disorder is now called depersonalization/derealization disorder.
In the DSM-5, it was combined with Derealization Disorder and renamed Depersonalization/Derealization Disorder (DDPD).

Somatization disorder

undifferentiated somatoform disordersomatizationbriquet's disorder
Somatization disorder and undifferentiated somatoform disorder were combined to become somatic symptom disorder, a diagnosis which no longer requires a specific number of somatic symptoms.
It was recognized in the DSM-IV-TR classification system, but in the latest version DSM-5, it was combined with undifferentiated somatoform disorder to become somatic symptom disorder, a diagnosis which no longer requires a specific number of somatic symptoms.