Daily Star (DC Comics)

Daily StarDaily Star'' (DC Comics)George TaylorTaylor, George
The Daily Star is a fictional broadsheet newspaper that appeared in Superman stories published by DC Comics.wikipedia
42 Related Articles

Metropolis (comics)

MetropolisMetropolis Special Crimes UnitCentennial Park
The Daily Star was based in Metropolis and employed Clark Kent, Lois Lane, and Jimmy Olsen; its chief editor is George Taylor both in the Golden Age stories and The New 52 relaunch comics.
Shuster was quoted as having modeled his Metropolis cityscape on that of his hometown, Toronto, and in the early versions of Superman, Clark Kent worked for a newspaper called the Daily Star, modeled after the real-life Toronto Star.

Lois Lane

LoisLois Joanne LaneLois Lane Kent
The Daily Star was based in Metropolis and employed Clark Kent, Lois Lane, and Jimmy Olsen; its chief editor is George Taylor both in the Golden Age stories and The New 52 relaunch comics. He often butted heads with Lois Lane, an aggressive, career-minded journalist who'd started as the Daily Star's "sob sister" (Action #7, Dec 1938) and "lovelorn editor" before earning her stripes as a full-fledged "news reporter" (Superman #3, Winter 1940) and war correspondent in Europe (Action #22, Mar 1940).
In the Golden Age comics, Lois was an aggressive, career-minded reporter for the Daily Star (the newspaper's name was changed to the Daily Planet in Action Comics #23 in 1940).

George Taylor (DC Comics)

George Taylor
The Daily Star was based in Metropolis and employed Clark Kent, Lois Lane, and Jimmy Olsen; its chief editor is George Taylor both in the Golden Age stories and The New 52 relaunch comics.
He is the editor-in-chief of the Metropolis newspaper the Daily Star.

Daily Planet

The Daily PlanetDaily StarFoswell, Sam
It was an original precursor of the Daily Planet and was later retconned as its own publishing company in modern comics. Then, in Spring 1940 (Action #23), without any in-story explanation, the newspaper suddenly was referred to as the Daily Planet, an especially amusing development for Kent and Lane, who were abroad and in the midst of a multi-issue storyline when their place of employment changed names (the alteration had been made earlier in the newspaper comic strip, with Nov 13, 1939's #259).
When Superman first appeared in comics (specifically 1938's Action Comics #1), his alter ego Clark Kent worked for a newspaper named the Daily Star, under editor George Taylor.

Superman (Earth-Two)

Kal-LSupermanGolden Age Superman
In his secret identity as Clark Kent, Superman also enjoyed success at the Daily Star, of which he was appointed editor-in-chief in the 1950s, replacing George Taylor.

Fiction

fictionalRealistic fictionfictitious
The Daily Star is a fictional broadsheet newspaper that appeared in Superman stories published by DC Comics.

Broadsheet

broadsheet formatbroadsheet newspaperbroadsheets
The Daily Star is a fictional broadsheet newspaper that appeared in Superman stories published by DC Comics.

Newspaper

daily newspapernewspapersdaily
The Daily Star is a fictional broadsheet newspaper that appeared in Superman stories published by DC Comics.

Superman

Kal-ElClark Kent / SupermanClark Kent
The Daily Star is a fictional broadsheet newspaper that appeared in Superman stories published by DC Comics.

DC Comics

DCDC EntertainmentDC Comic
The Daily Star is a fictional broadsheet newspaper that appeared in Superman stories published by DC Comics.

Clark Kent

ClarkClarc Kent-son/the Super-Manalter ego
The Daily Star was based in Metropolis and employed Clark Kent, Lois Lane, and Jimmy Olsen; its chief editor is George Taylor both in the Golden Age stories and The New 52 relaunch comics. When Superman first appeared in comics, in June 1938's Action Comics #1, his alter ego, Clark Kent, worked for the "large metropolitan daily" newspaper (Action #7, Dec 1938) the Daily Star under editor George Taylor (Superman #2, Fall 1939).

Jimmy Olsen

James OlsenElastic LadJames "Jimmy" Olsen
The Daily Star was based in Metropolis and employed Clark Kent, Lois Lane, and Jimmy Olsen; its chief editor is George Taylor both in the Golden Age stories and The New 52 relaunch comics.

The New 52

New 522011 reboot2011 relaunch
The Daily Star was based in Metropolis and employed Clark Kent, Lois Lane, and Jimmy Olsen; its chief editor is George Taylor both in the Golden Age stories and The New 52 relaunch comics.

Joe Shuster

ShusterJoseph ShusterJoseph "Joe" Shuster
Superman co-creator Joe Shuster named the Daily Star after the Toronto Daily Star in Ontario, which had been the newspaper that Shuster's parents received and for which Shuster had worked as a paperboy.

Toronto Star

The Toronto StarToronto Daily StarThe Star
Superman co-creator Joe Shuster named the Daily Star after the Toronto Daily Star in Ontario, which had been the newspaper that Shuster's parents received and for which Shuster had worked as a paperboy.

Ontario

Ontario, CanadaONProvince of Ontario
Superman co-creator Joe Shuster named the Daily Star after the Toronto Daily Star in Ontario, which had been the newspaper that Shuster's parents received and for which Shuster had worked as a paperboy.

Los Angeles

Los Angeles, CaliforniaLos Angeles, CALos Angeles, United States
"I have very fond memories of the Toronto Star," Shuster told Star reporter Henry Mietkiewicz for a story that ran on April 26, 1992, three months before Shuster died in Los Angeles.

Action Comics

Action Comics WeeklyAction Comics AnnualSuperman: Action Comics
When Superman first appeared in comics, in June 1938's Action Comics #1, his alter ego, Clark Kent, worked for the "large metropolitan daily" newspaper (Action #7, Dec 1938) the Daily Star under editor George Taylor (Superman #2, Fall 1939).

Alter ego

alter-egodouble lifealter egos
When Superman first appeared in comics, in June 1938's Action Comics #1, his alter ego, Clark Kent, worked for the "large metropolitan daily" newspaper (Action #7, Dec 1938) the Daily Star under editor George Taylor (Superman #2, Fall 1939).

Superman (comic book)

SupermanAdventures of SupermanThe Adventures of Superman
When Superman first appeared in comics, in June 1938's Action Comics #1, his alter ego, Clark Kent, worked for the "large metropolitan daily" newspaper (Action #7, Dec 1938) the Daily Star under editor George Taylor (Superman #2, Fall 1939).

Lynching

lynchedlynch moblynch
Kent apparently had persuaded Taylor to hire him only shortly before the first issue of Action by phoning in an exclusive account of Superman's first public act—thwarting an attempted lynching at the county jail (Superman #1, Summer 1939).

Scribe

scribesscribalscribing
Before long, Kent was referred to as the paper's "ace scribe" (Action #9, Feb 1939) and "ace reporter" (Action #6, Nov 1938).

War correspondent

war reporterspecial correspondentcombat correspondent
He often butted heads with Lois Lane, an aggressive, career-minded journalist who'd started as the Daily Star's "sob sister" (Action #7, Dec 1938) and "lovelorn editor" before earning her stripes as a full-fledged "news reporter" (Superman #3, Winter 1940) and war correspondent in Europe (Action #22, Mar 1940).

Europe

EuropeanEUEuropean continent
He often butted heads with Lois Lane, an aggressive, career-minded journalist who'd started as the Daily Star's "sob sister" (Action #7, Dec 1938) and "lovelorn editor" before earning her stripes as a full-fledged "news reporter" (Superman #3, Winter 1940) and war correspondent in Europe (Action #22, Mar 1940).

Comic strip

comic stripscartoon stripcomic-strip
Then, in Spring 1940 (Action #23), without any in-story explanation, the newspaper suddenly was referred to as the Daily Planet, an especially amusing development for Kent and Lane, who were abroad and in the midst of a multi-issue storyline when their place of employment changed names (the alteration had been made earlier in the newspaper comic strip, with Nov 13, 1939's #259).