Daimyō

feudal lordlorddaimyowarlordsfeudal lordslordsdaimyosdaiymodomain's lordDēmyō
The daimyō were powerful Japanese feudal lords who, until their decline in the early Meiji period, ruled most of Japan from their vast, hereditary land holdings.wikipedia
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Edo period

Edo-periodEdoTokugawa
From the Shugo of the Muromachi period through the Sengoku to the daimyō of the Edo period, the rank had a long and varied history. The Battle of Sekigahara in the year 1600 marked the beginning of the Edo period.
The Edo period or Tokugawa period is the period between 1603 and 1868 in the history of Japan, when Japanese society was under the rule of the Tokugawa shogunate and the country's 300 regional daimyō.

Meiji period

MeijiMeiji eraMeiji-period
The daimyō were powerful Japanese feudal lords who, until their decline in the early Meiji period, ruled most of Japan from their vast, hereditary land holdings.
In a move critical for the consolidation of the new regime, most daimyōs voluntarily surrendered their land and census records to the Emperor in the abolition of the Han system, symbolizing that the land and people were under the Emperor's jurisdiction.

Shugo

Governorconstablesgovernors
From the Shugo of the Muromachi period through the Sengoku to the daimyō of the Edo period, the rank had a long and varied history.
The position gave way to the emergence of the daimyōs (feudal lords) in the late 15th century, as shugo began to claim power over lands themselves, rather than serving simply as governors on behalf of the shogunate.

Samurai

bushibukewarrior
Daimyō often hired samurai to guard their land and they paid the samurai in land or food as relatively few could afford to pay samurai in money.
The samurai were usually associated with a clan and their lord, and were trained as officers in military tactics and grand strategy.

Sengoku period

Japan (Sengoku period)SengokuWarring States period
From the Shugo of the Muromachi period through the Sengoku to the daimyō of the Edo period, the rank had a long and varied history.
In the years preceding this era the Shogunate gradually lost influence and control over the daimyōs (local lords).

Tozama daimyō

tozamaoutside ''daimyōtozama daimyô
Major shugo-daimyō came from the Shiba, Hatakeyama, and Hosokawa clans, as well as the tozama clans of Yamana, Ōuchi, and Akamatsu. Ieyasu also categorized the daimyō according to their relation to the ruling Tokugawa family: the shinpan were related to the Tokugawa; the fudai had been vassals of the Tokugawa or allies in battle; and the tozama had not allied with the Tokugawa before the battle (did not necessarily fight against the Tokugawa).
A tozama daimyō was a daimyō who was considered an outsider by the rulers of Japan.

Shōgun

shogunateshogunBakufu
Subordinate to the shōgun, and nominally to the Emperor and the kuge, daimyō were powerful feudal rulers from the 10th century to the middle 19th century in Japan. Shōgun Tokugawa Ieyasu then reorganized roughly 200 daimyō and their territories into han, which were assessed by rice production.
In the early 11th century, daimyōs protected by samurai came to dominate internal Japanese politics.

Ashikaga shogunate

AshikagaAshikaga shōgunShōgun
The Ashikaga shogunate required the shugo-daimyō to reside in Kyoto, so they appointed relatives or retainers, called shugodai, to represent them in their home provinces.
The Ashikaga shogunate, also known as the Muromachi shogunate, was a dynasty originating from one of the plethora of Japanese daimyō which governed Japan from 1338 to 1573, the year in which Oda Nobunaga deposed Ashikaga Yoshiaki.

Muromachi period

Japan (Muromachi period)MuromachiJapan (Muromach period)
From the Shugo of the Muromachi period through the Sengoku to the daimyō of the Edo period, the rank had a long and varied history.
Yoshimitsu allowed the constables, who had had limited powers during the Kamakura period, to become strong regional rulers, later called daimyōs.

Provinces of Japan

provincesprovinceprovince of Japan
The shugo-daimyō held not only military and police powers, but also economic power within a province.
In the late Muromachi period, however, their function was gradually supplanted by the domains of the sengoku daimyō.

Ōnin War

Ōnin'' WarŌnin and Bunmei WarsŌnin no ran
The Ōnin War was a major uprising in which shugo-daimyō fought each other.
A dispute between Hosokawa Katsumoto and Yamana Sōzen escalated into a nationwide war involving the Ashikaga shogunate and a number of daimyō in many regions of Japan.

Ikkō-ikki

ikkipeasant revoltIkko rebels
During this and other wars of the time, kuni ikki, or provincial uprisings, took place as locally powerful warriors sought independence from the shugo-daimyō.
Ikkō-ikki were rebellious or autonomous groups of people that were formed in several regions of Japan in 15th-16th centuries; backed up by the power of the Jōdo Shinshū sect of Buddhism, they opposed the rule of governors or daimyō.

Akamatsu clan

Akamatsu
Major shugo-daimyō came from the Shiba, Hatakeyama, and Hosokawa clans, as well as the tozama clans of Yamana, Ōuchi, and Akamatsu.
They were prominent shugo-daimyō in Harima during the Sengoku period.

Hosokawa clan

HosokawaHosokawa familyKumamoto-Hosokawa clan
Major shugo-daimyō came from the Shiba, Hatakeyama, and Hosokawa clans, as well as the tozama clans of Yamana, Ōuchi, and Akamatsu.
In the Edo period, the Hosokawa clan was one of the largest landholding daimyō families in Japan.

Satake clan

Satake
Among the sengoku daimyō were many who had been shugo-daimyō, such as the Satake, Imagawa, Takeda, Toki, Rokkaku, Ōuchi, and Shimazu.
The Satake survived as lords (daimyō) of the Kubota Domain (also known as the Akita Domain).

Kuge

court noblecourt nobilitycourtier
Subordinate to the shōgun, and nominally to the Emperor and the kuge, daimyō were powerful feudal rulers from the 10th century to the middle 19th century in Japan.
In particular, after the Sengoku period they lost most of their financial basis and were no longer in a position to act as patrons of culture, but they passed on their knowledge as masters of particular fields such as writing waka poetry and playing instruments such as the biwa, and they had disciples among the daimyō and sometimes rich commoners.

Oda clan

Oda
New to the ranks of the daimyō were the Asakura, Amago, Nagao, Miyoshi, Chōsokabe, Jimbō, Hatano, Oda, and Matsunaga.
The Oda clan was a family of Japanese daimyōs who were to become an important political force in the unification of Japan in the mid-16th century.

Meiji Restoration

industrialization of JapanRestorationMeiji
The daimyō era ended soon after the Meiji Restoration with the adoption of the prefecture system in 1871.
In 1869, the daimyōs of the Tosa, Hizen, Satsuma and Chōshū Domains, who were pushing most fiercely against the shogunate, were persuaded to "return their domains to the Emperor".

Asakura clan

AsakuraAsakura family
New to the ranks of the daimyō were the Asakura, Amago, Nagao, Miyoshi, Chōsokabe, Jimbō, Hatano, Oda, and Matsunaga.
The family was a line of daimyō (feudal lords) which, along with the Azai clan, opposed Oda Nobunaga in the late 16th century.

Mōri clan

MōriMori clanMori
Additional sengoku-daimyō such as the Mōri, Tamura, and Ryūzōji arose from the ji-samurai.
During the Edo period his descendants became daimyō of the Chōshū Domain under the Tokugawa shogunate.

Rokkaku clan

Rokkaku
Among the sengoku daimyō were many who had been shugo-daimyō, such as the Satake, Imagawa, Takeda, Toki, Rokkaku, Ōuchi, and Shimazu.
Like other hard-pressed daimyōs, the Rokakku tried to enhance their military position by giving closer attention to improved civil administration within their domain.

Battle of Sekigahara

SekigaharaSekigahara CampaignBattle at Sekigahara
The Battle of Sekigahara in the year 1600 marked the beginning of the Edo period.
Tokugawa Ieyasu took three more years to consolidate his position of power over the Toyotomi clan and the various daimyō, but Sekigahara is widely considered to be the unofficial beginning of the Tokugawa shogunate, the last shogunate to control Japan.

Tokugawa Ieyasu

Ieyasu TokugawaIeyasuTokugawa
Shōgun Tokugawa Ieyasu then reorganized roughly 200 daimyō and their territories into han, which were assessed by rice production.
Originally named Matsudaira Takechiyo, he was the son of Matsudaira Hirotada, the daimyō of Mikawa of the Matsudaira clan, and Odai-no-kata (於大の方, Lady Odai), the daughter of a neighbouring samurai lord, Mizuno Tadamasa .

Han system

feudal domainhandomain
Shōgun Tokugawa Ieyasu then reorganized roughly 200 daimyō and their territories into han, which were assessed by rice production.
The han or domain is the Japanese historical term for the estate of a warrior after the 12th century or of a daimyō in the Edo period (1603–1868) and early Meiji period (1868–1912).

Fudai daimyō

fudaifudai'' domainfudai'' clan
Ieyasu also categorized the daimyō according to their relation to the ruling Tokugawa family: the shinpan were related to the Tokugawa; the fudai had been vassals of the Tokugawa or allies in battle; and the tozama had not allied with the Tokugawa before the battle (did not necessarily fight against the Tokugawa).
Fudai daimyō was a class of daimyōs who were hereditary vassals of the Tokugawa in Edo-period Japan.