The Buddhist Movement for Dalits was begun by Ambedkar when he converted with his followers in 1956 in Deekshabhoomi, Nagpur
Deekshabhoomi monument, located in Nagpur, Maharashtra, where B. R. Ambedkar converted to Buddhism in 1956, is the largest stupa in Asia.
Ambedkar delivering a speech to a rally at Yeola, Nashik, on 13 October 1935
Ambedkar delivering speech during conversion, Nagpur, 14 October 1956
Ambedkar delivering speech during conversion, Nagpur, 14 October 1956
District wise Buddhist population percentage, India census 2011. India's West-centre area, Maharashtra shows Marathi Buddhist population.
Statue of B.R.Ambedkar inside Ambedkar Park, Lucknow
Marathi Buddhists are celebrating 62nd Dhammachakra Pravartan Din at Aurangabad Caves area in Aurangabad, Maharashtra on 18 October 2018.
Flag symbolises Dalit movement in India.
Deekshabhoomi Stupa in Nagpur where Ambedkar converted to Buddhism.

Almost all Marathi Buddhists belong to the Navayana tradition, a 20th-century Buddhist revival movement in India that received its most substantial impetus from B. R. Ambedkar who called for the conversion to Buddhism by rejecting the caste-based society of Hinduism, that considered them to be the lowest in the hierarchy.

- Marathi Buddhists

According to the 2011 census, there are currently 8.44 million Buddhists in India, at least 6.5 million of whom are Marathi Buddhists in Maharashtra.

- Dalit Buddhist movement
The Buddhist Movement for Dalits was begun by Ambedkar when he converted with his followers in 1956 in Deekshabhoomi, Nagpur

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A Navayana Buddhist shrine with Ambedkar's portrait and The Buddha and His Dhamma book. The photograph is on the event of the 50th Dhammachakra Pravartan Day.

Navayana

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Also called Neo-Buddhism and Ambedkarite Buddhism.

Also called Neo-Buddhism and Ambedkarite Buddhism.

A Navayana Buddhist shrine with Ambedkar's portrait and The Buddha and His Dhamma book. The photograph is on the event of the 50th Dhammachakra Pravartan Day.
Young Indian samanera (novice Buddhist monk) in an Indian vihara. There are statues of the Buddha and bodhisattva B.R. Ambedkar.
Buddhist flag of Navayana Buddhists
Ambedkar delivering a speech during mass conversion in Nagpur, 14 October 1956.
Map showing major Buddhist divisions, Navayana in pink.
District wise Buddhist population percentage, India census 2011. India's West-centre area Maharashtra shows Navayana Marathi Buddhist population

In the Dalit Buddhist movement of India, Navayana is considered a new branch of Buddhism, different from the traditionally recognized branches of Theravada, Mahayana, and Vajrayana – considered to be foundational in the Buddhist traditions.

In the 2011 census, Marathi Buddhists were 6.5 million, constituting 5.8% of the population of Maharashtra and 77% of the Buddhist population of India.