Dambana

AnitismAnitistsLarauan and Likhatemples or altars
The dambana, in modern times, may refer to shrines of indigenous religions in the Philippines (mainly Tagalog areas), altar of Philippine churches, or monuments erected to remember Philippine history.wikipedia
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Katalonan

catalonan
The dambana is usually taken cared of by the katalonan, the indigenous spiritual leader of the barangay (community), and to some extent, the datu (barangay political leader) and the lakan (barangay coalition political leader) as well.
They safeguard the dambana, along with religious practices, of a community called barangay.

Tagalog people

TagalogTagalogsTagalas
The ethnic group that is usually associated with the dambana are the Tagalog people, although the majority of the Tagalogs have been converted into Christianity through forced religious Spanish rule between the 16th to 19th centuries.
The enhancements of these Tagalog societies until the middle of the 16th century made it possible for other Tagalog societies to spread and develop various cultural practices such as those concerning the dambana.

Anito

anitismspiritsanimist
In traditional dambana beliefs, all deities, beings sent by Bathala, and ancestor spirits are collectively called anitos.
These were called latangan or lantayan in Visayan and dambana or lambana in Tagalog.

Old Tagalog

Archaic TagalogClassical Tagalog
However, before the introduction of Roman Catholicism in the Philippines, the dambana (Old Tagalog: lambana) was used as the main term for a sacred place (banal na pook), which is a home to a single deity, various deities (gods and goddesses), ancestor spirits, and beings aside from ancestor spirits and deities.

Mount Makiling

Mt. MakilingMakiling Forest ReserveMakiling Forest Reservation
Due to this, majority of the indigenous Tagalog dambana practices have been lost, fragmented severely, or absorbed into Christian practices, such as the case in pilgrim devotion practices in Mount Makiling, which has Catholic and indigenous Tagalog practices involved. Prominent natural dambanas include Mount Makiling, Mount San Cristobal, Mount Banahaw, Laguna de Bay, Taal Volcano and lake, the Seven Lakes of San Pablo, the southern chain of the Sierra Madre mountains, the Bathala caves of Marinduque, the Lobo mountain chain, and various falls, rivers, and bays in the southern Tagalog region and certain areas in central Luzon.
It is one of the most known bundok dambanas in Calabarzon.

Kampilan

campilantalibong
It is adorned with statues home to anitos traditionally-called larauan, statues reserved for future burial practices modernly-called likha, scrolls or documents with suyat baybayin calligraphy, and other objects sacred to dambana practices such as lambanog (distilled coconut wine), tuba (undistilled coconut wine), bulaklak or flowers (like sampaguita, santan, gumamela, tayabak, and native orchids), palay (unhusked rice), bigas (husked rice), shells, pearls, jewels, beads, native crafts such as banga (pottery), native swords and bladed weapons (such as kampilan, dahong palay, bolo, and panabas), bodily accessories (like singsing or rings, kwintas or necklaces, and hikaw or earrings), war shields (such as kalasag), enchanted masks, battle weapons used in pananandata or kali, charms called agimat or anting-anting, curse deflectors such as buntot pagi, native garments and embroideries, food, and gold in the form of adornments (gold belts, necklace, wrist rings, and feet rings) and barter money (piloncitos and gold rings).
In traditional societies of the Tagalog people, it is also used as a form of religious adornment in a dambana.

Suyat

writing systems
It is adorned with statues home to anitos traditionally-called larauan, statues reserved for future burial practices modernly-called likha, scrolls or documents with suyat baybayin calligraphy, and other objects sacred to dambana practices such as lambanog (distilled coconut wine), tuba (undistilled coconut wine), bulaklak or flowers (like sampaguita, santan, gumamela, tayabak, and native orchids), palay (unhusked rice), bigas (husked rice), shells, pearls, jewels, beads, native crafts such as banga (pottery), native swords and bladed weapons (such as kampilan, dahong palay, bolo, and panabas), bodily accessories (like singsing or rings, kwintas or necklaces, and hikaw or earrings), war shields (such as kalasag), enchanted masks, battle weapons used in pananandata or kali, charms called agimat or anting-anting, curse deflectors such as buntot pagi, native garments and embroideries, food, and gold in the form of adornments (gold belts, necklace, wrist rings, and feet rings) and barter money (piloncitos and gold rings).

Tagalog language

TagalogTagalog-languageFilipino
The dambana, in modern times, may refer to shrines of indigenous religions in the Philippines (mainly Tagalog areas), altar of Philippine churches, or monuments erected to remember Philippine history.

Dahong palay

Dinahong palay
It is adorned with statues home to anitos traditionally-called larauan, statues reserved for future burial practices modernly-called likha, scrolls or documents with suyat baybayin calligraphy, and other objects sacred to dambana practices such as lambanog (distilled coconut wine), tuba (undistilled coconut wine), bulaklak or flowers (like sampaguita, santan, gumamela, tayabak, and native orchids), palay (unhusked rice), bigas (husked rice), shells, pearls, jewels, beads, native crafts such as banga (pottery), native swords and bladed weapons (such as kampilan, dahong palay, bolo, and panabas), bodily accessories (like singsing or rings, kwintas or necklaces, and hikaw or earrings), war shields (such as kalasag), enchanted masks, battle weapons used in pananandata or kali, charms called agimat or anting-anting, curse deflectors such as buntot pagi, native garments and embroideries, food, and gold in the form of adornments (gold belts, necklace, wrist rings, and feet rings) and barter money (piloncitos and gold rings).
The dahong palay was initially used for agricultural work since pre-colonial times, and later on, was used for dambana practices as well.

Buntot Pagi

fashioned as a whip
It is adorned with statues home to anitos traditionally-called larauan, statues reserved for future burial practices modernly-called likha, scrolls or documents with suyat baybayin calligraphy, and other objects sacred to dambana practices such as lambanog (distilled coconut wine), tuba (undistilled coconut wine), bulaklak or flowers (like sampaguita, santan, gumamela, tayabak, and native orchids), palay (unhusked rice), bigas (husked rice), shells, pearls, jewels, beads, native crafts such as banga (pottery), native swords and bladed weapons (such as kampilan, dahong palay, bolo, and panabas), bodily accessories (like singsing or rings, kwintas or necklaces, and hikaw or earrings), war shields (such as kalasag), enchanted masks, battle weapons used in pananandata or kali, charms called agimat or anting-anting, curse deflectors such as buntot pagi, native garments and embroideries, food, and gold in the form of adornments (gold belts, necklace, wrist rings, and feet rings) and barter money (piloncitos and gold rings).
The weapon is also used in dambana practices as a form of curse deflector.

Mount Banahaw

BanahawMt. BanahawMount Banahao
Prominent natural dambanas include Mount Makiling, Mount San Cristobal, Mount Banahaw, Laguna de Bay, Taal Volcano and lake, the Seven Lakes of San Pablo, the southern chain of the Sierra Madre mountains, the Bathala caves of Marinduque, the Lobo mountain chain, and various falls, rivers, and bays in the southern Tagalog region and certain areas in central Luzon.
The mountain is considered by many as a "Holy mountain", thus a bundok dambana, and is popular among pilgrims along with mountain climbers.

Cavite

Cavite ProvinceCavite, PhilippinesProvince of Cavite
Other archaeological sites with traditional religious artifacts have been rediscovered in Calatagan, Batangas, Santa Ana, Manila, Bulacan, Marinduque, Cavite, and Laguna.
Anitism, animism, and atheism are also practiced in the province.

Angono Petroglyphs

However, remnants of man-made dambanas have been rediscovered since the middle of the 20th century, such as the Angono Petroglyphs in Rizal which was rediscovered in 1965 and the Limestone tombs of Kamhantik in Quezon province which was rediscovered in 2011.
It is widely believed that the figures drawn on the walls are for healing purposes as the site is a dambana.

Quezon

Quezon ProvinceTayabasTayabas Province
However, remnants of man-made dambanas have been rediscovered since the middle of the 20th century, such as the Angono Petroglyphs in Rizal which was rediscovered in 1965 and the Limestone tombs of Kamhantik in Quezon province which was rediscovered in 2011.
Most non-Christians practice Islam, Anitism, animism, or atheism.

Laguna (province)

LagunaLaguna provinceLaguna, Philippines
Other archaeological sites with traditional religious artifacts have been rediscovered in Calatagan, Batangas, Santa Ana, Manila, Bulacan, Marinduque, Cavite, and Laguna.
Most non-Christians in Laguna practice Islam, Anitism, animism, or atheism.

Limestone tombs of Kamhantik

Kamhantiklimestone coffins
However, remnants of man-made dambanas have been rediscovered since the middle of the 20th century, such as the Angono Petroglyphs in Rizal which was rediscovered in 1965 and the Limestone tombs of Kamhantik in Quezon province which was rediscovered in 2011.
Prior to scientific discovery, the ruins were already much known to the Lumanay townsfolk, and they consider the ruins as one of the most sacred places for the anitos, and therefore, a dambana.

Marinduque

Marinduque IslandGovernor of MarinduqueMa'''rinduque
Prominent natural dambanas include Mount Makiling, Mount San Cristobal, Mount Banahaw, Laguna de Bay, Taal Volcano and lake, the Seven Lakes of San Pablo, the southern chain of the Sierra Madre mountains, the Bathala caves of Marinduque, the Lobo mountain chain, and various falls, rivers, and bays in the southern Tagalog region and certain areas in central Luzon. Other archaeological sites with traditional religious artifacts have been rediscovered in Calatagan, Batangas, Santa Ana, Manila, Bulacan, Marinduque, Cavite, and Laguna.
Muslims, Anitists, animists, and atheists are also present in the province.

Rizal

Rizal ProvinceProvince of RizalMorong
However, remnants of man-made dambanas have been rediscovered since the middle of the 20th century, such as the Angono Petroglyphs in Rizal which was rediscovered in 1965 and the Limestone tombs of Kamhantik in Quezon province which was rediscovered in 2011.
Muslims, Anitists, animists, and atheists are also present in the province.

Philippines

FilipinoPhilippinePhilippine Islands
The dambana, in modern times, may refer to shrines of indigenous religions in the Philippines (mainly Tagalog areas), altar of Philippine churches, or monuments erected to remember Philippine history.

Deity

deitiesgodsgod
However, before the introduction of Roman Catholicism in the Philippines, the dambana (Old Tagalog: lambana) was used as the main term for a sacred place (banal na pook), which is a home to a single deity, various deities (gods and goddesses), ancestor spirits, and beings aside from ancestor spirits and deities.