Dan (rank)

dandan ranknidanSandan2nd dandegreejūdan1st DanYondanDuan
The dan ranking system is used by many Japanese, Okinawan, and Korean martial art organizations to indicate the level of a person's ability within a given system that could be generally described as a finite set that once achieved becomes an art that can be defined by some formalized system of patternism.wikipedia
731 Related Articles

Kanō Jigorō

Jigoro KanoKano JigoroJigorō Kanō
Martial arts writer Takao Nakaya claims that this dan system was first applied to martial arts in Japan by Kanō Jigorō (1860–1938), the founder of judo, in 1883, and later introduced to other East Asian countries.
Pedagogical innovations attributed to Kanō include the use of black and white belts, and the introduction of dan ranking to show the relative ranking among members of a martial art style.

Go (game)

Goweiqigame of Go
Used as a ranking system to quantify skill level within a given set of specific patterns, it was originally used at a go school during the Edo period.
Both astronauts were awarded honorary dan ranks by the Nihon Ki-in.

Red belt (martial arts)

red beltbrown beltred
In the modern Japanese martial arts, holders of dan ranks often wear a black belt; those of higher rank may also wear red-and-white and red belts.
In some schools, especially those with lineage related to Kodokan Judo, a red belt signifies ninth or tenth degree Dan rank, the highest ranks attainable.

Judo

judokayukojūdōka
Martial arts writer Takao Nakaya claims that this dan system was first applied to martial arts in Japan by Kanō Jigorō (1860–1938), the founder of judo, in 1883, and later introduced to other East Asian countries.
In 1900, these rules were adopted by the Kodokan with amendments made to prohibit all joint locks for kyu grades and added wrist locks to the prohibited kansetsu-waza for dan grades.

Shiro Saigo

Saigō ShirōShirō Saigō
Kanō started the modern rank system in 1883 when he awarded shodan (the lowest dan rank) to two of his senior students (Shiro Saigo and Tomita Tsunejirō).
Saigo, together with Tsunejiro Tomita, became first in history of judo to be awarded Shodan by the founder of judo Jigoro Kano, who established the kyu-dan ranking system.

Tomita Tsunejirō

Tsunejiro TomitaTsunejirō TomitaTomita Tsuneo
Kanō started the modern rank system in 1883 when he awarded shodan (the lowest dan rank) to two of his senior students (Shiro Saigo and Tomita Tsunejirō).
He was awarded 7th dan upon his death on January 13, 1937.

Black belt (martial arts)

black beltblack beltsblackbelt
In the modern Japanese martial arts, holders of dan ranks often wear a black belt; those of higher rank may also wear red-and-white and red belts.
In Japanese martial arts the further subdivisions of black belt ranks may be linked to dan grades and indicated by 'stripes' on the belt.

Professional shogi player

women's professional shogi playerprofessionalprofessional shogi players
Amateur players train to become professionals at one of the JSA's apprentice schools and are ranked from 6-kyū to 3-dan.
All shogi players are ranked by a dan system.

Kyūdō

kyudoJapanese archeryarchery
Dan ranks are also given for strategic board games such as go, Japanese chess (shōgi), and renju, as well as for other arts such as the tea ceremony (sadō or chadō), flower arrangement (ikebana), Japanese calligraphy (shodō), and Japanese archery (Kyudo).
Using a system which is common to modern budō (martial art) practices, most Western kyūdō schools periodically hold examinations, which, if the archer passes, results in the conveying of a grade, which can be kyū or dan level.

Shodan (rank)

shodanFirst Dan1st dan
Kanō started the modern rank system in 1883 when he awarded shodan (the lowest dan rank) to two of his senior students (Shiro Saigo and Tomita Tsunejirō).
The 2nd dan is higher than Shodan, but the 1st dan is called Shodan traditionally and not "Ichidan".

Shogi

shōgiJapanese chessShougi
Dan ranks are also given for strategic board games such as go, Japanese chess (shōgi), and renju, as well as for other arts such as the tea ceremony (sadō or chadō), flower arrangement (ikebana), Japanese calligraphy (shodō), and Japanese archery (Kyudo).
Amateur players are ranked from 15 kyū to 1 kyū and then from 1 dan to 8 dan.

Menkyo

menkyo kaidenCertificate of MasteryComplete license
Prior to this, martial arts schools awarded progress with less frequent menkyo licenses or secret scrolls.

Kendo

kendōkendoka3-dan
In martial arts such as iaidō, kendō or jōdō, no external signifier of rank is worn, though a black belt is by far the most recognizable symbol to the general public.
The "Kodansha Meibo" (a register of dan graded members of the All Japan Kendo Federation) shows that as of September 2007, there were 1.48 million registered dan graded kendōka in Japan.

Rank in Judo

rankedblue beltdan
In Judo, improvement and understanding of the art is denoted by a system of rankings split into kyū and dan grades.

Tang Soo Do

TangSooDoHwa Soo DoT'ang Soo Do
After the occupation ended, newly emerging martial arts like taekwondo, tang soo do, soo bahk do and hapkido adopted the dan and geup ranks.
One differentiating characteristic of the Moo Duk Kwan style is that the black belt, or dan rank, is frequently represented by a midnight blue belt (some Chung Do Kwan schools also have adopted this custom) for students who attain dan rank.

Kyū

kyugeupwhite
In modern times, a dan-ranked practitioner of a style is usually recognized as a martial artist who has surpassed the kyū, or basic, ranks.

Iaido

iaidōiaiIaijutsu
In martial arts such as iaidō, kendō or jōdō, no external signifier of rank is worn, though a black belt is by far the most recognizable symbol to the general public.
Iaido as it is practiced by the International Kendo Federation (FIK) and All Japan Iaido Federation (ZNIR) uses the kyu-dan system, created in 1883.

Taekwondo

Tae Kwon DoTaekwon-DoTaekwando
After the occupation ended, newly emerging martial arts like taekwondo, tang soo do, soo bahk do and hapkido adopted the dan and geup ranks.

Karate

karatekasport karateKaratedo
In 1924 Gichin Funakoshi, founder of Shotokan Karate, adopted the Dan system from the judo founder Jigoro Kano using a rank scheme with a limited set of belt colors.

Brazilian jiu-jitsu ranking system

black beltbrown beltPurple Belt
The black belt itself has six different degrees of expertise, similar to dan in traditional Japanese arts.

Soo Bahk Do

After the occupation ended, newly emerging martial arts like taekwondo, tang soo do, soo bahk do and hapkido adopted the dan and geup ranks.

Aikido

aikidōAi Ki DoAIK.
Aikido practitioners (commonly called aikidōka outside Japan) generally progress by promotion through a series of "grades" (kyū), followed by a series of "degrees" (dan), pursuant to formal testing procedures.

Edo period

Tokugawa periodEdo-periodEdo
Used as a ranking system to quantify skill level within a given set of specific patterns, it was originally used at a go school during the Edo period.

Renju

Tarannikov opening rule
Dan ranks are also given for strategic board games such as go, Japanese chess (shōgi), and renju, as well as for other arts such as the tea ceremony (sadō or chadō), flower arrangement (ikebana), Japanese calligraphy (shodō), and Japanese archery (Kyudo).

Japanese tea ceremony

tea ceremonychanoyuchadō
Dan ranks are also given for strategic board games such as go, Japanese chess (shōgi), and renju, as well as for other arts such as the tea ceremony (sadō or chadō), flower arrangement (ikebana), Japanese calligraphy (shodō), and Japanese archery (Kyudo).