Daniel Sickles

Major General Sickles c. 1862
Sickles shoots Key in 1859.
The trial of Sickles. Engraving from Harper's Magazine
Maj. Gen. Daniel E. Sickles, c. 1859–1870. Carte de Visite Collection, Boston Public Library
Sickles's leg, along with a cannonball similar to the one that shattered it, on display at the National Museum of Health and Medicine
Generals Joseph Carr, Sickles, and Charles Graham in 1886, near the Trostle Barn where Sickles was wounded at Gettysburg
Excelsior Brigade monument at Gettysburg
Sickles' funeral
80px
General Sickles (center) with his staff, after the loss of his leg at Gettysburg
Sickles in 1902
Sickles funeral in Manhattan on May 8, 1914

American politician, soldier, and diplomat.

- Daniel Sickles
Major General Sickles c. 1862

148 related topics

Relevance

Lafayette Square, Washington, D.C.

Seven-acre public park located within President's Park, Washington, D.C., United States, directly north of the White House on H Street, bounded by Jackson Place on the west, Madison Place on the east and Pennsylvania Avenue on the south.

Seven-acre public park located within President's Park, Washington, D.C., United States, directly north of the White House on H Street, bounded by Jackson Place on the west, Madison Place on the east and Pennsylvania Avenue on the south.

Major General Marquis Gilbert de Lafayette, a statue of Lafayette by Alexandre Falguière and Antonin Mercié, 1891
The Andrew Jackson statue (pictured circa 1900) by Clark Mills was erected in Lafayette Park in 1853.
Clark Mills' equestrian statue of President Andrew Jackson, erected in 1853

On February 27, 1859, US Representative Daniel Sickles killed Philip Barton Key II in Lafayette Square.

Harper's Weekly engraving of Philip Barton Key from a photograph by Mathew Brady

Philip Barton Key II

American lawyer who served as U.S. Attorney for the District of Columbia.

American lawyer who served as U.S. Attorney for the District of Columbia.

Harper's Weekly engraving of Philip Barton Key from a photograph by Mathew Brady
Coat of Arms of Philip Barton Key II
Harper's Weekly engraving of Daniel Sickles shooting Key
Harper's Weekly engraving of Mrs. Sickles from a photograph of Mathew Brady

He is most famous for his public affair with Teresa Bagioli Sickles, and his eventual murder at the hands of her husband, Congressman Daniel Sickles of New York.

Meade, portrait by Mathew Brady

George Meade

United States Army officer and civil engineer best known for decisively defeating Confederate General Robert E. Lee at the Battle of Gettysburg in the American Civil War.

United States Army officer and civil engineer best known for decisively defeating Confederate General Robert E. Lee at the Battle of Gettysburg in the American Civil War.

Meade, portrait by Mathew Brady
Meade photographed by Mathew Brady or Levin C. Handy
General Meade's horse, Old Baldy
Commanders of the Army of the Potomac, Gouverneur K. Warren, William H. French, George G. Meade, Henry J. Hunt, Andrew A. Humphreys, and George Sykes in September 1863
General Meade's headquarters, Gettysburg, Pennsylvania
Engraving by James E. Kelly of George G. Meade and the Council of War at Gettysburg, July 2, 1863
General Meade's headquarters, Culpeper, Virginia
Horse artillery headquarters in Brandy Station, Virginia, February 1864. Meade stands at the far right with Generals John Sedgwick and Alfred Torbert, along with staff officers.
Generals George G. Meade, Andrew A. Humphreys and staff in Culpeper, Virginia outside Meade's headquarters, 1863
General Meade and other generals of Army of the Potomac in Washington, D.C., June 1865
General George G. Meade and staff in Washington, D.C. in June 1865
George Meade tombstone in Laurel Hill Cemetery
George Gordon Meade Memorial, sculpted by Charles Grafly, located in front of the E. Barrett Prettyman Federal Courthouse in Washington, D.C.
General Meade lived at 1836 Delancey Place, Philadelphia, and died in the house, 1872, according to the Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission marker in front.
A monument to Meade by sculptor Henry Kirke Bush-Brown, on the Gettysburg Battlefield, located close to the point where Pickett's Charge was repulsed.
Equestrian statue in Philadelphia, designed by Alexander Milne Calder, located in Fairmount Park, which Meade was the commissioner of following the war.

Meade suffered from intense political rivalries within the Army, notably with Major Gen. Daniel Sickles, who tried to discredit Meade's role in the victory at Gettysburg.

III Corps badge

III Corps (Union Army)

There were four formations in the Union Army designated as III Corps (or Third Army Corps) during the American Civil War.

There were four formations in the Union Army designated as III Corps (or Third Army Corps) during the American Civil War.

III Corps badge
Daniel Sickles and staff after the Battle of Gettysburg
Maj. Gen. David B. Birney
Brig. Gen. Gershom Mott

In the meantime, General Hooker had been promoted to the command of the Center Grand Division, composed of the III and V Corps; General George Stoneman had been assigned to the command of the III Corps; General Birney to that of the 1st Division; General Daniel E. Sickles to the 2nd Division; and a third division comprising nine month regiments under General Amiel W. Whipple had been added.

The Old Bailey in London (in 1808) was the venue for more than 100,000 criminal trials between 1674 and 1834, including all death penalty cases.

Insanity defense

Affirmative defense by excuse in a criminal case, arguing that the defendant is not responsible for their actions due to an episodic or persistent psychiatric disease at the time of the criminal act.

Affirmative defense by excuse in a criminal case, arguing that the defendant is not responsible for their actions due to an episodic or persistent psychiatric disease at the time of the criminal act.

The Old Bailey in London (in 1808) was the venue for more than 100,000 criminal trials between 1674 and 1834, including all death penalty cases.

The defense was first successfully used by U.S. Congressman Daniel Sickles of New York in 1859 after he had killed his wife's lover, Philip Barton Key II.

The insignia of the Excelsior Brigade

Excelsior Brigade

Military unit in the Union Army during the American Civil War.

Military unit in the Union Army during the American Civil War.

The insignia of the Excelsior Brigade
Daniel E. Sickles raised and organized much of what became the Excelsior Brigade

Mainly composed of infantry regiments raised in the state of New York primarily by former U.S. Representative Daniel Sickles, the brigade served in several of the Army of the Potomac's most important battles in the Eastern Theater, including Chancellorsville and Gettysburg.

The Battle of Gettysburg took place in the lands surrounding Gettysburg, Pennsylvania.

Gettysburg Battlefield

Area of the July 1–3, 1863, military engagements of the Battle of Gettysburg within and around the borough of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania.

Area of the July 1–3, 1863, military engagements of the Battle of Gettysburg within and around the borough of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania.

The Battle of Gettysburg took place in the lands surrounding Gettysburg, Pennsylvania.
The Pennsylvania Memorial is the battlefield's largest and 1 of over 12 state monuments.
Gettysburg Battlefield lithograph map showing Union and Confederate positions.
(John B. Bachelder)
Southwest view of the Sherfy farm (right background) from the Pennsylvania Monument observation deck, 1 of 6 on the battlefield: 3 on towers (Warfield Ridge), Oak Ridge, Culp's Hill), 1 on Little Round Top, & 1 on the closed Cyclorama Building.
The Lincoln Address Memorial (top left) in the Gettysburg National Cemetery. The 2 small flanking markers for the 3rd NY Artillery monument (foreground) indicate the breadth of the unit's position.
The Virginia Monument is the battlefield's largest equestrian monument.
Statue of General Wells by J. Otto Schweizer.

The federal Gettysburg National Park Commission was established on March 3, 1893; after which Congressman Daniel Sickles initiated a May 31, 1894, resolution “to acquire by purchase (or by condemnation) … such lands, or interests in lands, upon or in the vicinity of said battle field.

Northern Virginia, Maryland and Pennsylvania, 1861–1865

Battle of Gettysburg

Fought July 1–3, 1863, in and around the town of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, by Union and Confederate forces during the American Civil War.

Fought July 1–3, 1863, in and around the town of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, by Union and Confederate forces during the American Civil War.

Northern Virginia, Maryland and Pennsylvania, 1861–1865
The Gettysburg Campaign, 1863
The Battlefield of Gettysburg, 1863
This 1863 oval-shaped map depicts the Gettysburg Battlefield during July 1–3, 1863, showing troop and artillery positions and movements, relief hachures, drainage, roads, railroads, and houses with the names of residents at the time of the Battle of Gettysburg.
This November 1862 Harper's Magazine illustration shows Confiderate Army troops escorting captured African American civilians south into slavery. En route to Gettysburg, the Army of Northern Virginia kidnapped approximately 40 black civilians and sent them south into slavery.
Overview map of the first day of the Battle of Gettysburg
Marker commemorating the first shot fired at the Battle of Gettysburg at 7:30 am on July 1, 1863 by Lt. Marcellus Jones
Robert E. Lee's plan for July 2, 1863, the second day of the Battle of Gettysburg
Overview map of the second day of the Battle of Gettysburg, July 2, 1863
Union Army breastworks on Culp's Hill, 1863
Overview map of the third day of the Battle of Gettysburg, July 3, 1863
The high water mark on Cemetery Ridge with the 72nd Pennsylvania Infantry Monument commemorating the 72nd Pennsylvania Infantry Regiment at right and the Copse of Trees to the left, August 2005
"The Harvest of Death": Union dead on the battlefield at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, photographed July 5 or July 6, 1863, by Timothy H. O'Sullivan
John L. Burns, veteran of the War of 1812, civilian who fought at the Battle of Gettysburg with Union troops, standing with bayoneted musket. Mathew Brady's National Photographic Portrait Galleries, photographer. From the Liljenquist Family Collection of Civil War Photographs, Prints and Photographs Division, Library of Congress
Gettysburg Campaign (July 5 – July 14, 1863)
On November 19, 1863, U.S. President Abraham Lincoln delivered the Gettysburg Address, considered one of the best-known speeches in American history. A crowd of citizens and soldiers surround Lincoln (with a red arrow pointing to his location in photo)
{{center|Maj. Gen.
{{center|Gen.
{{center|Maj. Gen.
Gettysburg National Cemetery, July 2003
{{center|Maj. Gen.
{{center|Maj. Gen.
{{center|Maj. Gen.
{{center|Maj. Gen.
{{center|Maj. Gen.
{{center|Maj. Gen.
{{center|Maj. Gen.
{{center|Lt. Gen.
{{center|Lt.. Gen.
{{center|Lt. Gen.
{{center|Maj. Gen.
The 1936 Battle of Gettysburg half dollar
Gettysburg Centennial Commemorative issue of 1963

III Corps, commanded by Maj. Gen. Daniel Sickles, with divisions commanded by Maj. Gen. David B. Birney and Maj. Gen. Andrew A. Humphreys.

Key c. 1825

Francis Scott Key

American lawyer, author, and amateur poet from Frederick, Maryland, who is best known for writing the lyrics for the American national anthem "The Star-Spangled Banner".

American lawyer, author, and amateur poet from Frederick, Maryland, who is best known for writing the lyrics for the American national anthem "The Star-Spangled Banner".

Key c. 1825
Mary Tayloe Lloyd
Coat of Arms of Francis Scott Key
Fort McHenry looking towards the position of the British ships (with the Francis Scott Key Bridge in the distance on the upper left)
Key law office on Court Street in Frederick, Maryland
The Howard family vault at Saint Paul's Cemetery, Baltimore, Maryland
Francis Scott Key Monument as it stood in Golden Gate Park, San Francisco, until it was toppled in June 2020. The empty plinth is now surrounded by 350 black steel sculptures that honor 350 Africans kidnapped from Angola and transported across the Atlantic on slave ships.
Defaced Francis Scott Key Monument in Baltimore, 2017
Maryland Historical Society plaque marking the birthplace of Francis Scott Key

In1859, Key's son Philip Barton Key II, who also served as United States Attorney for the District of Columbia, was shot and killed by Daniel Sicklesa U.S.Representative from New York who would serve as a general in the American Civil Warafter he discovered that Philip Barton Key was having an affair with his wife.

Photograph by Mathew Brady, c. 1860-1865

Edwin Stanton

American lawyer and politician who served as Secretary of War under the Lincoln Administration during most of the American Civil War.

American lawyer and politician who served as Secretary of War under the Lincoln Administration during most of the American Civil War.

Photograph by Mathew Brady, c. 1860-1865
Stanton's birthplace in Steubenville, Ohio
Stanton's home in Cadiz, Ohio
Stanton's home on Third Street in Steubenville
A lithograph of the Wheeling Suspension Bridge
An engraving of Cyrus H. McCormick
Stanton's home in Washington, D.C.
A Harper's Weekly depiction of Sickles shooting Key
A depiction of the scene in the courtroom during Daniel Sickles' trial
Simon Cameron, Lincoln's Secretary of War before Stanton
Stanton as Secretary of War
Photograph of Edwin Stanton
Secretary of War Edwin Stanton, 1862. From the Liljenquist Family Collection of Civil War Photographs, Prints and Photographs Division, Library of Congress
Abraham Lincoln lay on his deathbed at the Petersen House in Washington, surrounded by family, friends and government officials.
Maj. Gen. William Tecumseh Sherman
"The Situation", a Harper's Weekly cartoon gives a humorous breakdown of "the situation". Stanton aims a cannon labeled "Congress" on the side at President Andrew Johnson and Lorenzo Thomas to show how he was using Congress to defeat the president and his unsuccessful replacement. He also holds a ramrod marked "Tenure of Office Bill" and cannonballs on the floor are marked "Justice". Ulysses S. Grant and an unidentified man stand to Stanton's left.
The 1st Stanton postage stamp, issue of 1871
Stanton depicted on a $1 1891 Treasury Note.

Daniel Sickles was a member of the United States House of Representatives from New York.