Daniel Webster

WebsterDan'l WebsterAmerican politician of the same nameDanielSeventh of March SpeechUS Secretary of State, Daniel WebsterWebster, DanielWebsterite
Daniel Webster (January 18, 1782 – October 24, 1852) was an American statesman who represented New Hampshire and Massachusetts in the United States Congress and served as the United States Secretary of State under Presidents William Henry Harrison, John Tyler, and Millard Fillmore.wikipedia
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Whig Party (United States)

WhigWhig PartyWhigs
Throughout his career, he was a member of the Federalist Party, the National Republican Party, and the Whig Party.
Other influential party leaders include Henry Clay, Daniel Webster, William Seward, John J. Crittenden, and Truman Smith.

New Hampshire

NHState of New HampshireNew Hampshire, U.S.
Daniel Webster (January 18, 1782 – October 24, 1852) was an American statesman who represented New Hampshire and Massachusetts in the United States Congress and served as the United States Secretary of State under Presidents William Henry Harrison, John Tyler, and Millard Fillmore.
Among prominent individuals from New Hampshire are founding father Nicholas Gilman, Senator Daniel Webster, Revolutionary War hero John Stark, editor Horace Greeley, founder of the Christian Science religion Mary Baker Eddy, poet Robert Frost, astronaut Alan Shepard, rock musician Ronnie James Dio, author Dan Brown, actor Adam Sandler, inventor Dean Kamen, comedians Sarah Silverman and Seth Meyers, restaurateurs Richard and Maurice McDonald, and President of the United States Franklin Pierce.

1836 United States presidential election

18361836 presidential election1836 election
Webster joined with other Jackson opponents in forming the Whig Party, and unsuccessfully ran in the 1836 presidential election.
Two other Whigs, Daniel Webster and Willie Person Mangum, carried Massachusetts and South Carolina respectively on single-state tickets.

Millard Fillmore

FillmorePresident FillmorePresident Millard Fillmore
Daniel Webster (January 18, 1782 – October 24, 1852) was an American statesman who represented New Hampshire and Massachusetts in the United States Congress and served as the United States Secretary of State under Presidents William Henry Harrison, John Tyler, and Millard Fillmore.
Fillmore came to the notice of the influential Massachusetts senator Daniel Webster, who took the new congressman under his wing.

Webster–Ashburton Treaty

Webster-Ashburton TreatyMaine border disputenorth-eastern boundary dispute
As secretary of state, Webster negotiated the Webster–Ashburton Treaty, which settled border disputes with Britain.

John C. Calhoun

John CalhounJohn Caldwell CalhounCalhoun
He strongly objected to the theory of nullification espoused by John C. Calhoun, and his Second Reply to Hayne speech is widely regarded as one of the greatest speeches ever delivered in Congress.
Calhoun was one of the "Great Triumvirate" or the "Immortal Trio" of Congressional leaders, along with his Congressional colleagues Daniel Webster and Henry Clay.

John Tyler

TylerPresident TylerJohn Tyler, Jr.
Daniel Webster (January 18, 1782 – October 24, 1852) was an American statesman who represented New Hampshire and Massachusetts in the United States Congress and served as the United States Secretary of State under Presidents William Henry Harrison, John Tyler, and Millard Fillmore.
Instead, Whigs in various regions put forth their own preferred tickets, reflecting the party's tenuous coalition: the Massachusetts Whigs nominated Daniel Webster and Francis Granger, the Anti-Masons of the Northern and border states backed William Henry Harrison and Granger, and the states' rights advocates of the middle and lower South nominated Hugh Lawson White and John Tyler.

Franklin, New Hampshire

FranklinFranklin, NHFranklin (city)
Daniel Webster was born on January 18, 1782, in Salisbury, New Hampshire, at a location within the present-day city of Franklin.
Daniel Webster was born in a section of Franklin that was then part of Salisbury.

New England

Southern New EnglandNorthern New EnglandNew England region
Like his father, and like many other New England farmers, Webster was firmly devoted to the Federalist Party and favored a strong central government.
Leading statesmen hailed from the region, including Daniel Webster.

Fryeburg Academy

Freyeburg Academy
In order to help support his brother Ezekiel's study at Dartmouth, Webster temporarily resigned from the law office to work as a schoolteacher at Fryeburg Academy in Maine.
One of the first headmasters was Daniel Webster, who taught at the school for a year.

Dartmouth College

DartmouthDarmouth Dartmouth
After studying the classics and other subjects for several months under a clergyman, Webster was admitted to Dartmouth College in 1797.
Daniel Webster, an alumnus of the class of 1801, presented the College's case to the Supreme Court, which found the amendment of Dartmouth's charter to be an illegal impairment of a contract by the state and reversed New Hampshire's takeover of the college.

Gibbons v. Ogden

Gibbons v OgdenGibbons vs. Ogden1824 landmark United States Supreme Court ruling
He became a leading attorney before the Supreme Court of the United States, winning cases such as Dartmouth College v. Woodward, McCulloch v. Maryland, and Gibbons v. Ogden.
Exiled Irish patriot Thomas Addis Emmet and Thomas J. Oakley argued for Ogden, while U.S. Attorney General William Wirt and Daniel Webster argued for Gibbons.

Nullification Crisis

nullificationNullification ConventionNullification Crisis of 1832
Webster supported Jackson's defiant response to the Nullification Crisis, but broke with the president due to disagreements over the Second Bank of the United States.
Daniel Webster of Massachusetts led the New England opposition to this tariff.

Second Bank of the United States

Bank of the United Statesnational bankUnited States Bank
Webster supported Jackson's defiant response to the Nullification Crisis, but broke with the president due to disagreements over the Second Bank of the United States.
The U.S. Supreme Court had affirmed the constitutionality of the bank under McCulloch v. Maryland, the 1819 case which Daniel Webster had argued successfully on its behalf a decade earlier, the U.S. Treasury recognized the useful services it provided, and the American currency was healthy and stable.

Conscription in the United States

drafteddraftconscription
Webster continued to criticize the war and attacked effort to impose conscription, wartime taxes, and a new trade embargo.
This proposal was fiercely criticized on the House floor by antiwar Congressman Daniel Webster of New Hampshire.

1852 United States presidential election

18521852 presidential election1852 election
Webster sought the Whig nomination in the 1852 presidential election, but a split between supporters of Fillmore and Webster led to the nomination of General Winfield Scott.
A deadlock occurred because most New England delegates supported Daniel Webster.

1828 United States presidential election

18281828 presidential election1828 election
After Andrew Jackson defeated Adams in the 1828 presidential election, Webster became a leading opponent of Jackson's domestic policies.
President Adams and his allies, including Secretary of State Clay and Senator Daniel Webster of Massachusetts, became known as the National Republicans.

National Republican Party

Anti-JacksonianNational RepublicanNational Republicans
Throughout his career, he was a member of the Federalist Party, the National Republican Party, and the Whig Party.
Adams politicians, including most ex Federalists (such as Daniel Webster and Adams himself), would gradually evolve into the National Republican Party; and those politicians that supported Jackson would later help form the modern Democratic Party.

Dartmouth College v. Woodward

Dartmouth College caseTrustees of Dartmouth College v. Woodward1819 ''Dartmouth'' case
He became a leading attorney before the Supreme Court of the United States, winning cases such as Dartmouth College v. Woodward, McCulloch v. Maryland, and Gibbons v. Ogden.
The trustees retained Dartmouth alumnus Daniel Webster, a New Hampshire native who would later become a U.S. Senator for Massachusetts and Secretary of State under President Millard Fillmore.

McCulloch v. Maryland

McCulloch v MarylandbanksM'Culloch v. Maryland
He became a leading attorney before the Supreme Court of the United States, winning cases such as Dartmouth College v. Woodward, McCulloch v. Maryland, and Gibbons v. Ogden.
The Bank was represented by Daniel Webster.

Ebenezer Webster

Ebenezer
He was the son of Abigail (née Eastman) and Ebenezer Webster, a farmer and local official who served in the French and Indian War and the American Revolutionary War.
He was the father of Daniel Webster, a noted lawyer and orator who served in the United States Congress, as United States Secretary of State, and in other offices.

John Quincy Adams

AdamsJohn QuincyJohn Q. Adams
Webster returned to the House in 1823 and became a key supporter of President John Quincy Adams.
Adams also met with Federalists such as Daniel Webster, promising that he would not deny governmental positions to members of their party.

1840 United States presidential election

18401840 presidential election1840 election
He supported Harrison in the 1840 presidential election and was appointed secretary of state after Harrison took office.
The delegates unanimously voted to nominate William Henry Harrison for president (who the party had supported for president the previous election along with Francis Granger for Vice President) and Daniel Webster for Vice President.

Federalist Party

FederalistFederalistsF
Throughout his career, he was a member of the Federalist Party, the National Republican Party, and the Whig Party. Like his father, and like many other New England farmers, Webster was firmly devoted to the Federalist Party and favored a strong central government.
However, a few younger leaders did appear, notably Daniel Webster.

William Henry Harrison

William H. HarrisonHarrisonWilliam Harrison
Daniel Webster (January 18, 1782 – October 24, 1852) was an American statesman who represented New Hampshire and Massachusetts in the United States Congress and served as the United States Secretary of State under Presidents William Henry Harrison, John Tyler, and Millard Fillmore.
Daniel Webster ran in Massachusetts, and Willie P. Mangum in South Carolina.