A report on Dara Shikoh

Miniature portrait of Dara Shikoh
18th-century portrait of Dara Shikoh
Dara's brothers (left to right) Shah Shuja, Aurangzeb and Murad Baksh in their younger years, ca 1637
Young Dara Shikoh (Left) and Mian Mir (Right)
The marriage of Dara Shikoh and Nadira Begum, 1875–90
Wedding procession of Dara Shikoh, with Shah Shuja and Aurangzeb behind him. Royal Collection Trust, London.
Dara Shikoh with his army
Humayun's Tomb, where the remains of Dara Shikoh were interred in an unidentified grave.
A page from the Majma-ul-Bahrain, Victoria Memorial, Calcutta.
Dara Shikoh (with Mian Mir and Mullah Shah Badakhshi), ca. 1635
A painting from the Persian translation of Yoga Vasistha manuscript, 1602
A Prince in Iranian Costume by Muhammad Khan. Dara Shikoh Album, Agra, 1633–34.
Shah Jahan Receiving Dara Shikoh

The eldest son and heir-apparent of the Mughal emperor Shah Jahan.

- Dara Shikoh
Miniature portrait of Dara Shikoh

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Princess Roshanara with her attendants

Roshanara Begum

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Mughal princess and the third daughter of Emperor Shah Jahan and his wife, Mumtaz Mahal.

Mughal princess and the third daughter of Emperor Shah Jahan and his wife, Mumtaz Mahal.

Princess Roshanara with her attendants
Tomb of Roshanara Begum, Delhi
Tomb of Roshanara in her baradhari in Phulbangash, north Delhi
Front and left side view of tomb of Roshanara Begum
Interior decoration
A view of tomb of Roshanara Begum
A view of Roshanara Garden through tomb of Roshanara Begum

Of Roshanara's four brothers, the eldest, Dara Shikoh, was Shah Jahan's favourite son and heir apparent to the Peacock Throne.

Majma-ul-Bahrain in the Victoria memorial, Calcutta.

Majma-ul-Bahrain

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Majma-ul-Bahrain in the Victoria memorial, Calcutta.
Shahzada Dara Shukoh seated with his spiritual master, Mian Mir, c. 1635.

Majma-ul-Bahrain (, "The Confluence of the Two Seas" or "The Mingling of the Two Oceans") is a book on comparative religion authored by Mughal Shahzada Dara Shukoh as a short treatise in Persian, c. 1655.

Dara Shikoh and Sipihr Shikoh

Sipihr Shikoh

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Dara Shikoh and Sipihr Shikoh

Sipihr Shikoh (13 October 1644 – 2 or 3 July 1708) also known as Sipihr Shukoh, was a Mughal prince as the fourth son of Crown Prince Dara Shikoh and his consort Nadira Banu Begum.

Jahangir receives Prince Khurram at Ajmer on his return from the Mewar campaign

Ajmer

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One of the major and oldest cities in the Indian state of Rajasthan and the centre of the eponymous Ajmer District.

One of the major and oldest cities in the Indian state of Rajasthan and the centre of the eponymous Ajmer District.

Jahangir receives Prince Khurram at Ajmer on his return from the Mewar campaign
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View of Ajmer from Taragarh Fort
Dargah Sharif Ajmer
A Hindu Style Pillar in Adhai Din Ka Jhopara Monument.
Swarna Nagari in Soniji Ki Nasiyan
Akbari Fort and Museum
Nareli Jain Temple is a recent addition to Ajmer
Baradari on Lake Anasagar
Tomb of Khwaja Husain Ajmeri

Jahanara Begum and Dara Shikoh, children of Shah Jahan, were both born in the city in 1614 and 1615 respectively.

Jahanzeb Banu Begum

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Mughal princess and the chief consort of Muhammad Azam Shah, the heir-apparent to Emperor Aurangzeb, who briefly became Mughal emperor in 1707.

Mughal princess and the chief consort of Muhammad Azam Shah, the heir-apparent to Emperor Aurangzeb, who briefly became Mughal emperor in 1707.

Jahanzeb's mausoleum, near Aurangabad in 1860s

Jahanzeb was the daughter of Crown Prince Dara Shikoh, the eldest son and heir-apparent of Emperor Shah Jahan.

Portrait of fourth Mughal Emperor Jahangir

Jahangir

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The fourth Mughal Emperor, who ruled from 1605 until his death in 1627.

The fourth Mughal Emperor, who ruled from 1605 until his death in 1627.

Portrait of fourth Mughal Emperor Jahangir
Potrait of Empress Mariam-uz-Zamani, giving birth to Prince Salim in Fatehpur Sikri.
Emperor Jahangir weighing his son Prince Khurram (the future Shah Jahan) on a weighing scale by artist Manohar (1615).
Jahangir with falcon on horseback
The Tomb of Jahangir in Shahdara, Lahore
A Mughal miniature dated from the early 1620s depicting the Mughal emperor Jahangir preferring an audience with Sufi saint to his contemporaries, the Ottoman Sultan Ahmed I and the King of England James I (d. 1625); the picture is inscribed in Persian: "Though outwardly shahs stand before him, he fixes his gazes on dervishes."
Portrait of Mughal Emperor Jahangir's making a Dua
Jahangir's Jade hookah, National Museum, New Delhi
Jahangir and Anarkali

Italian writer and traveller, Niccolao Manucci, who worked under Jahangir's grandson, Dara Shikoh, began his discussion of Jahangir by saying: "It is a truth tested by experience that sons dissipate what their fathers gained in the sweat of their brow."

Gauhar Ara Begum

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Mughal princess and the fourteenth and youngest child of the Mughal emperor Shah Jahan and his wife Mumtaz Mahal.

Mughal princess and the fourteenth and youngest child of the Mughal emperor Shah Jahan and his wife Mumtaz Mahal.

When Sipihr Shikoh, son of her eldest brother Dara married Aurangzeb's daughter Zubdat-un-Nissa in 1673, Gauhar Ara and her maternal cousin Hamida Banu Begum arranged the wedding ceremony.

Shahzada of the Mughals, Dara Shukoh, seated with three Sufi masters, c. 1650.

Sirr-i-Akbar

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Shahzada of the Mughals, Dara Shukoh, seated with three Sufi masters, c. 1650.

The Sirr-i-Akbar (, “The Greatest Mystery” or “The Greatest Secret”) is a version of the Upanishads authored by the Mughal-Shahzada Dara Shukoh, translated from Sanskrit into Persian, c. 1657.

Udaipuri Mahal

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Concubine of the Mughal emperor Aurangzeb.

Concubine of the Mughal emperor Aurangzeb.

Described as 'the darling of Aurangzeb's old age', Udaipuri Mahal had been a slave girl in the harem of Prince Dara Shikoh, and before entering his harem, she had been a dancing girl.

Genealogy of the Mughal Dynasty. Only principal offspring of each emperor are provided in the chart.

Mughal emperors

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The Mughal emperors were the supreme head of state of the Mughal Empire on the Indian subcontinent, mainly corresponding to the modern countries of India, Pakistan, Afghanistan and Bangladesh.

The Mughal emperors were the supreme head of state of the Mughal Empire on the Indian subcontinent, mainly corresponding to the modern countries of India, Pakistan, Afghanistan and Bangladesh.

Genealogy of the Mughal Dynasty. Only principal offspring of each emperor are provided in the chart.
Group portrait of Mughal rulers, from Babur to Aurangzeb, with the Mughal ancestor Timur seated in the middle. On the left: Shah Jahan, Akbar and Babur, with Abu Sa'id of Samarkand and Timur's son, Miran Shah. On the right: Aurangzeb, Jahangir and Humayun, and two of Timur's other offspring Umar Shaykh and Muhammad Sultan. Created c. 1707–12
Shah Jahan, accompanied by his three sons: Dara Shikoh, Shah Shuja and Aurangzeb, and their maternal grandfather Asaf Khan IV
Akbar Shah II and his four sons

Shah Jahan's eldest son, the liberal Dara Shikoh, became regent in 1658, as a result of his father's illness.