Dardanelles

HellespontDardanelles StraitÇanakkale BoğazıDardanelles StraitsStrait of ÇanakkaleHellespontosBlack Sea straitsDar''dan''ellesDardanelle StraitDardanelles straight
The Dardanelles (Çanakkale Boğazı, Δαρδανέλλια), also known from Classical Antiquity as the Hellespont, is a narrow, natural strait and internationally significant waterway in northwestern Turkey that forms part of the continental boundary between Europe and Asia, and separates Asian Turkey from European Turkey.wikipedia
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Anatolia

Asia MinorAsiatic TurkeyAnatolian Plateau
, is a narrow, natural strait and internationally significant waterway in northwestern Turkey that forms part of the continental boundary between Europe and Asia, and separates Asian Turkey from European Turkey.
The Sea of Marmara forms a connection between the Black and Aegean seas through the Bosphorus and Dardanelles straits and separates Anatolia from Thrace on the Balkan peninsula of Europe.

Aegean Sea

AegeanAegean coastAgean sea
One of the world's narrowest straits used for international navigation, the Dardanelles connects the Sea of Marmara with the Aegean and Mediterranean Seas, while also allowing passage to the Black Sea by extension via the Bosphorus.
In the north, the Aegean is connected to the Marmara Sea and the Black Sea by the straits of the Dardanelles and Bosphorus.

Sea of Marmara

Marmara SeaPropontisMarmara
One of the world's narrowest straits used for international navigation, the Dardanelles connects the Sea of Marmara with the Aegean and Mediterranean Seas, while also allowing passage to the Black Sea by extension via the Bosphorus.
The Bosphorus strait connects it to the Black Sea and the Dardanelles strait to the Aegean Sea.

Çanakkale

ChanakKale-i SultaniyeCanakkale
The Dardanelles is 61 km long, and 1.2 to 6 km wide, averaging 55 m deep with a maximum depth of 103 m at its narrowest point abreast the city of Çanakkale. The strait is 61 km long, and 1.2 to 6 km wide, averaging 55 m deep with a maximum depth of 103 m at its narrowest point at Nara Burnu, abreast Çanakkale.
Çanakkale (pronounced ) is a city and seaport in Turkey, in Çanakkale Province, on the southern coast of the Dardanelles at their narrowest point.

Bosporus

BosphorusBosphorus StraitBosphorous
One of the world's narrowest straits used for international navigation, the Dardanelles connects the Sea of Marmara with the Aegean and Mediterranean Seas, while also allowing passage to the Black Sea by extension via the Bosphorus. Together with the Bosphorus, the Dardanelles forms the Turkish Straits.
It is the world's narrowest strait used for international navigation, the Bosporus connects the Black Sea with the Sea of Marmara, and, by extension via the Dardanelles, the Aegean and Mediterranean seas.

Black Sea

BlackEuxinePontus Euxinus
One of the world's narrowest straits used for international navigation, the Dardanelles connects the Sea of Marmara with the Aegean and Mediterranean Seas, while also allowing passage to the Black Sea by extension via the Bosphorus.
It has a positive water balance; that is, a net outflow of water 300 km3 per year through the Bosphorus and the Dardanelles into the Aegean Sea.

Gallipoli

Gallipoli PeninsulaThracian ChersoneseChersonese
Most of the northern shores of the strait along the Gallipoli Peninsula (Gelibolu) are sparsely settled, while the southern shores along the Troad Peninsula (Biga) are inhabited by the city of Çanakkale's urban population of 110,000.
The Gallipoli peninsula (Gelibolu Yarımadası;, Chersónisos tis Kallípolis) is located in the southern part of East Thrace, the European part of Turkey, with the Aegean Sea to the west and the Dardanelles strait to the east.

Turkish Straits

StraitsBlack Sea StraitsStraits Question
Together with the Bosphorus, the Dardanelles forms the Turkish Straits.
They consist of the Dardanelles and the Bosphorus.

Troad

ancient TroadTroasTaruisa
Most of the northern shores of the strait along the Gallipoli Peninsula (Gelibolu) are sparsely settled, while the southern shores along the Troad Peninsula (Biga) are inhabited by the city of Çanakkale's urban population of 110,000.
Bounded by the Dardanelles to the northwest, by the Aegean Sea to the west and separated from the rest of Anatolia by the massif that forms Mount Ida, the Troad is drained by two main rivers, the Scamander (Karamenderes) and the Simois, which join at the area containing the ruins of Troy.

Dardanus (city)

DardanusDardaniaDardanian
These castles together were called the Dardanelles, probably named after Dardanus, an ancient city on the Asian shore of the strait which in turn was said to take its name from Dardanus, the mythical son of Zeus and Electra.
At the time of the geographer Strabo, the city of Dardanus stood one mile south of the headland of Dardanis, the point at which the Hellespont, which today is called "the Dardanelles" after the city, begins to narrow.

Mediterranean Sea

MediterraneanMediterranean coastWestern Mediterranean
One of the world's narrowest straits used for international navigation, the Dardanelles connects the Sea of Marmara with the Aegean and Mediterranean Seas, while also allowing passage to the Black Sea by extension via the Bosphorus.
The Sea of Marmara (Dardanelles) is often considered a part of the Mediterranean Sea, whereas the Black Sea is generally not.

International waters

high seasinternational waterwaymare liberum
One of the world's narrowest straits used for international navigation, the Dardanelles connects the Sea of Marmara with the Aegean and Mediterranean Seas, while also allowing passage to the Black Sea by extension via the Bosphorus.

East Thrace

Eastern ThraceEuropean TurkeyTurkish Thrace
, is a narrow, natural strait and internationally significant waterway in northwestern Turkey that forms part of the continental boundary between Europe and Asia, and separates Asian Turkey from European Turkey.
The two continents are separated by the Dardanelles, the Bosphorus (collectively known as the Turkish Straits) and the Sea of Marmara, a route of about 361 km.

Troy

TrojanTrojansIlium
The ancient city of Troy was located near the western entrance of the strait, and the strait's Asiatic shore was the focus of the Trojan War.
Troy (, Troía, Ἴλιον, Ílion or Ἴλιος, Ílios; Troia and Ilium; Hittite: 𒌷𒃾𒇻𒊭 Wilusa or 𒋫𒊒𒄿𒊭 Truwisa; Truva or Troya) was a city in the far northwest of the region known in late Classical antiquity as Asia Minor, now known as Anatolia in modern Turkey, just south of the southwest mouth of the Dardanelles strait and northwest of Mount Ida.

Abydos (Hellespont)

AbydosAbydusAbydos, Hellespont
Herodotus says that, circa 482 BC, Xerxes I (the son of Darius) had two pontoon bridges built across the width of the Hellespont at Abydos, in order that his huge army could cross from Persia into Greece.
It was located at the Nara Burnu promontory on the Asian coast of the Hellespont, opposite the ancient city of Sestos, and near the city of Çanakkale in Turkey.

Trojan War

Fall of TroySiege of TroyTroy
The ancient city of Troy was located near the western entrance of the strait, and the strait's Asiatic shore was the focus of the Trojan War.
The ancient Greeks believed that Troy was located near the Dardanelles and that the Trojan War was a historical event of the 13th or 12th century BC, but by the mid-19th century AD, both the war and the city were widely seen as non-historical.

Nara Burnu

Nagara PointNaraNagara
The strait is 61 km long, and 1.2 to 6 km wide, averaging 55 m deep with a maximum depth of 103 m at its narrowest point at Nara Burnu, abreast Çanakkale.
Nara Burnu (Turkish "Cape Nara"), formerly Nağara Burnu, in English Nagara Point, and in older sources Point Pesquies, is a headland on the Anatolian side of the Dardanelles Straits, north of Çanakkale.

Xerxes' Pontoon Bridges

a bridgebridge of shipsbridged
The Histories of Herodotus vii.33–37 and vii.54–58 give details of building and crossing of Xerxes' Pontoon Bridges.
Xerxes' Pontoon Bridges were constructed in 480 BC during the second Persian invasion of Greece upon the order of Xerxes I of Persia for the purpose of Xerxes’ army to traverse the Hellespont (the present day Dardanelles) from Asia into Thrace, then also controlled by Persia (in the European part of modern Turkey).

Golden Fleece

ChrysomallosChrysomallusfleece
It was so called from Helle, the daughter of Athamas, who was drowned here in the mythology of the Golden Fleece.
Nepheles' children escaped on the yellow ram over the sea, but Helle fell off and drowned in the strait now named after her, the Hellespont.

Xerxes I

XerxesXerxes I of PersiaXerxes the Great
The Persian army of Xerxes I of Persia and later the Macedonian army of Alexander the Great crossed the Dardanelles in opposite directions to invade each other's lands, in 480 BC and 334 BC respectively.
From 483 BC, Xerxes prepared his expedition: The Xerxes Canal was dug through the isthmus of the peninsula of Mount Athos, provisions were stored in the stations on the road through Thrace, and two pontoon bridges later known as Xerxes' Pontoon Bridges were built across the Hellespont.

Hero and Leander

LeanderHeroa figure of the classical Greek mythology
Likewise, the strait was the scene of the legend of Hero and Leander, wherein the lovesick Leander swam the strait nightly in order to tryst with his beloved, the priestess Hero, and was drowned in a storm.
like "hero" in English), a priestess of Aphrodite (Venus in Roman mythology) who dwelt in a tower in Sestos on the European side of the Hellespont (today's Dardanelles), and Leander (, Léandros), a young man from Abydos on the opposite side of the strait.

Allies of World War I

AlliesAlliedAllied Powers
Control over it has been an objective of a number of hostilities in modern history, notably the attack of the Allied Powers on the Dardanelles during the 1915 Battle of Gallipoli in the course of World War I.
Serbia also potentially gave Russia the ability to achieve their long-held objective of capturing Constantinople and the Dardanelles.

Harpalus (engineer)

engineer HarpalusHarpalusHarpalus the engineer
Harpalus the engineer eventually helped the invading armies to cross by lashing the ships together with their bows facing the current and, so it is said, two additional anchors.
Harpalus or Harpalos is a name reported by modern historical books (tertiary sources) as the engineer who built the pontoon bridge over the Hellespont (from Abydos to Sestos) for Xerxes in 480 BC.

Pontoon bridge

floating bridgepontoonpontoon bridges
Herodotus says that, circa 482 BC, Xerxes I (the son of Darius) had two pontoon bridges built across the width of the Hellespont at Abydos, in order that his huge army could cross from Persia into Greece.
Other spectacular pontoon bridges were Xerxes' Pontoon Bridges across the Hellespont by Xerxes I in 480 BC to transport his huge army into Europe:

Alexander the Great

AlexanderAlexander III of MacedonAlexander of Macedon
The Persian army of Xerxes I of Persia and later the Macedonian army of Alexander the Great crossed the Dardanelles in opposite directions to invade each other's lands, in 480 BC and 334 BC respectively.
Taking over the invasion project of Philip II, Alexander's army crossed the Hellespont in 334 BC with approximately 48,100 soldiers, 6,100 cavalry and a fleet of 120 ships with crews numbering 38,000, drawn from Macedon and various Greek city-states, mercenaries, and feudally raised soldiers from Thrace, Paionia, and Illyria.