Dardanelles Operation (1807)

Dardanelles Operationblocking the Dardanelles to Russian ships19 February 1807BritishDardanellesdetailsforce the Dardanellesforcing of the Dardanelleslost 600 men under fire of the shore batteriessuccessful defense
The Dardanelles Operation was the Royal Navy's unsuccessful attempt to impose British demands on the Ottoman Empire as part of the Anglo-Turkish War (1807-1809).wikipedia
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Horace François Bastien Sébastiani de La Porta

Horace SébastianiHorace SebastianiSébastiani
In 1806, the French envoy Sebastiani had been dispatched to Constantinople with orders to bring about Turkey's re-entry into the Napoleonic Wars.
In 1807, Sébastiani organized the defense of Constantinople during the Dardanelles Operation.

Anglo-Turkish War (1807–09)

Anglo-Turkish WarAnglo-Turkish War (1807-1809)Anglo-Turkish War (1807–1809)
The Dardanelles Operation was the Royal Navy's unsuccessful attempt to impose British demands on the Ottoman Empire as part of the Anglo-Turkish War (1807-1809).
During the Dardanelles Operation in September 1806, Britain pressured Sultan Selim III to expel Sebastiani, declare war on France, cede the Danubian Principalities to Russia, and surrender the Ottoman fleet, together with the forts on the Dardanelles, to the Royal Navy.

HMS Canopus (1798)

FranklinHMS ''CanopusCanopus
The ships immediately available for the task were HMS Canopus, HMS Standard, HMS Thunderer, HMS Glatton, and the two bomb ships HMS Lucifer and HMS Meteor, under the command of Vice-Admiral Cuthbert Collingwood, commander-in-chief of the British Mediterranean Fleet, sailed for the Dardanelles and made preparations for the upcoming assault.
She saw action with Duckworth's fleet at the Battle of San Domingo, and remained with him during the attempt to force the Dardanelles, and the operations in support of the Alexandria expedition in 1807.

Sir John Duckworth, 1st Baronet

John Thomas DuckworthJohn DuckworthDuckworth
Admiral Duckworth, who commanded the British, was under orders to bombard Constantinople and seize the Turkish battle fleet.
Serving with most of the great names of the Royal Navy during the later 18th and early 19th centuries, he fought almost all of Britain's enemies on the seas at one time or another, including a Dardanelles operation that would be remembered a century later during the First World War.

HMS Standard (1782)

HMS ''StandardStandard
The ships immediately available for the task were HMS Canopus, HMS Standard, HMS Thunderer, HMS Glatton, and the two bomb ships HMS Lucifer and HMS Meteor, under the command of Vice-Admiral Cuthbert Collingwood, commander-in-chief of the British Mediterranean Fleet, sailed for the Dardanelles and made preparations for the upcoming assault.
While in the Mediterranean she served during Vice Admiral Sir John Duckworth's unsuccessful 1807 Dardanelles Operation.

HMS Ajax (1798)

HMS ''AjaxAjaxAjax'' 74
Picking up Windsor Castle 98 guns and Repulse 74 guns from Gibraltar and Pompée 74 and Ajax 74 from Malta as replacements for the Russian fleet under Seniavin, which was still in the Adriatic, Duckworth proceeded to Tenedos.
Ajax participated in the Egyptian operation of 1801, the Battle of Cape Finisterre in 1805 and the Battle of Trafalgar, before she was lost to a disastrous fire in 1807 during the Dardanelles Operation.

Russo-Turkish War (1806–1812)

Russo-Turkish WarRusso-Turkish War (1806-1812)Russo-Turkish War (1806–12)
Despite the British ultimatum, on December 27 Selim declared war on Russia.
The Sultan reacted by blocking the Dardanelles to Russian ships and declared war on Russia.

Dardanelles Gun

Great Turkish Bombard
One of the batteries deployed by the Turks against the British Fleet was armed with a medieval 18.6 ton cast bronze piece with 63 cm diameter stones used for projectiles, known as the Dardanelles Gun.
The Dardanelles Gun or Great Turkish Bombard (Şahi topu or simply Şahi) is a 15th-century siege cannon, specifically a super-sized bombard, which saw action in the 1807 Dardanelles Operation.

Dmitry Senyavin

SenyavinAdmiral SeniavinDmitriy Senyavin
In addition, four Russian ships-of-the-line under Admiral Dmitry Senyavin were sent to support the British, but did not join Duckworth until after the exit from Dardanelles was made.
Contrary to his expectations, Sir John Thomas Duckworth, a British admiral who had just lost 600 men under fire of the shore batteries, refused to join his own fleet with Senyavin's and embarked upon an ill-fated expedition to Alexandria.

HMS Thunderer (1783)

HMS ''ThundererThundererH.M.S. ''Thunderer
The ships immediately available for the task were HMS Canopus, HMS Standard, HMS Thunderer, HMS Glatton, and the two bomb ships HMS Lucifer and HMS Meteor, under the command of Vice-Admiral Cuthbert Collingwood, commander-in-chief of the British Mediterranean Fleet, sailed for the Dardanelles and made preparations for the upcoming assault.
In 1807, Thunderer served in the Dardanelles Operation as part of a squadron under Admiral Sir John Duckworth and was badly damaged when the squadron withdrew from the area.

Edward Nicolls

Nicolls
Duckworth then ordered marines under Edward Nicolls to land and seize the shore batteries, and as the Turkish gunners tried to flee from an island they called Brota, the Royal Marines captured two guns.
It was during this period, too, that he was honourably mentioned in despatches for his part in the Dardanelles Operation, during which he captured a Turkish flag.

Thomas Harvey (Royal Navy officer)

Thomas HarveySir Thomas Harvey
The son of a senior Royal Navy officer and from a family with a long military tradition, Harvey distinguished himself under his father at the Glorious First of June and as a post-captain in his own right at Admiral John Thomas Duckworth's attempt to force the Dardanelles in 1807 and commanded numerous ships and stations in the post-war period.

HMS Repulse (1803)

HMS ''RepulseRepulse
Picking up Windsor Castle 98 guns and Repulse 74 guns from Gibraltar and Pompée 74 and Ajax 74 from Malta as replacements for the Russian fleet under Seniavin, which was still in the Adriatic, Duckworth proceeded to Tenedos.
In 1807 the ship served in the Mediterranean squadron under Vice-Admiral John Thomas Duckworth and Vice-Admiral Harry Riddick during the Dardanelles Operation and the Alexandria expedition of 1807.

HMS Endymion (1797)

HMS ''EndymionEndymionHMS ''Emdymion
In 1807 she took part in the Dardanelles Operation, where she was detached to Constantinople with the British ambassador for negotiations with the Ottoman Empire.

HMS Active (1799)

HMS ''ActiveActive
An initial assignment was her participation in Thomas Louis's squadron in Admiral Duckworth's Dardanelles Operation.

Battle of the Dardanelles (1807)

Battle of the DardanellesDardanelles Battle of the Dardanelles
Long after France and Russia had made peace and Senyavin had defeated the Turkish fleet at Dardanelles on 10–11 May 1807, the Ottomans would remain at war with Russia, draining a significant portion of the Russian army, which also became involved in operations against Sweden in the Finnish War, and later in the resumption of hostilities against France in 1812.

Thomas Bladen Capel

Thomas CapelCapelBladen Thomas
Capel returned to Constantinople later that year when he took part in further the forcing of the Dardanelles under Sir John Duckworth.

HMS Windsor Castle (1790)

HMS ''Windsor CastleWindsor Castle
While in the Mediterranean she served during Vice Admiral Sir John Duckworth's unsuccessful 1807 Dardanelles Operation.

HMS Pompee (1793)

HMS ''PompeePompeeHMS ''Pompée
In 1807 the ship, under the command of Captain Richard Dacres served in the Mediterranean squadron under Rear-Admiral Sir Sydney Smith, as part of the Vice-Admiral Duckworth's Dardanelles Operation and later the Alexandria expedition of 1807.

Thomas Louis

Sir Thomas LouisRear Admiral LouisRear-Admiral Sir Thomas Louis
Three months later Louis led a division of Duckworth's force in a major attempt to force passage of the channel in what later became known as the Dardanelles Operation.

Charles Marsh Schomberg

Charles Schomberg Commodore '''Charles Marsh SchombergCaptain Schomberg
In February 1807 Schomberg took part in the failed Dardanelles Operation under John Duckworth, but on his return to Malta Madras was put out of commission, and he returned to England, after an absence of more than ten years.

Arthur Kaye Legge

Arthur LeggeLeggeSir Arthur Kaye Legge
By 1807, Revenge was stationed with the Mediterranean Fleet and participated in the Dardanelles Operation under John Thomas Duckworth.

John Talbot (Royal Navy officer)

John TalbotSir John TalbotThe Hon. Sir John Talbot
For this success, Talbot was moved to the ship of the line and then in which he participated in the Dardanelles Operation under John Thomas Duckworth.

Dardanelles

HellespontDardanelles StraitÇanakkale Boğazı
During the Napoleonic Wars, Russia—supported by Great Britain in the Dardanelles Operation— blockaded the straits in 1807.

Richard Dacres (Royal Navy officer)

Richard DacresSir Richard Dacres Vice-Admiral '''Richard Dacres
In this role Dacres went on to see service in the amphibious operations at Calabria, leading to the Battle of Maida, and later Admiral John Thomas Duckworth's failed Dardanelles Operation and the Alexandria expedition in February 1807.