Dartmouth workshop

Dartmouth ConferenceDartmouth proposalDartmouth Summer Research Project on Artificial Intelligencea workshopDartmouth Summer Research Conference on AIDartmouth Summer Research Conference on Artificial IntelligenceDartmouth Summer Research Projectsummer AI conferenceworkshop
The Dartmouth Summer Research Project on Artificial Intelligence was a 1956 summer workshop widely considered to be the founding event of artificial intelligence as a field.wikipedia
50 Related Articles

Artificial intelligence

AIA.I.artificially intelligent
The Dartmouth Summer Research Project on Artificial Intelligence was a 1956 summer workshop widely considered to be the founding event of artificial intelligence as a field.
The field of AI research was born at a workshop at Dartmouth College in 1956, where the term "Artificial Intelligence" was coined by John McCarthy to distinguish the field from cybernetics and escape the influence of the cyberneticist Norbert Wiener.

Dartmouth College

DartmouthDarmouth Dartmouth
In 1955, John McCarthy, then a young Assistant Professor of Mathematics at Dartmouth College, decided to organize a group to clarify and develop ideas about thinking machines.
Faculty members have been at the forefront of such major academic developments as the Dartmouth Workshop, the Dartmouth Time Sharing System, Dartmouth BASIC, and Dartmouth ALGOL 30.

John McCarthy (computer scientist)

John McCarthyMcCarthyMcCarthy, John
In 1955, John McCarthy, then a young Assistant Professor of Mathematics at Dartmouth College, decided to organize a group to clarify and develop ideas about thinking machines.
McCarthy coined the term "artificial intelligence" in 1955, and organized the famous Dartmouth conference in Summer 1956.

Nathaniel Rochester (computer scientist)

Nathaniel RochesterNathan RochesterNat Rochester
On September 2, 1955, the project was formally proposed by McCarthy, Marvin Minsky, Nathaniel Rochester and Claude Shannon.
The meeting, now known as the Dartmouth Conference, is widely considered the "birth of artificial intelligence."

Oliver Selfridge

Oliver
According to Stottler Henke Associates, besides the proposal's authors, attendees at the conference included Ray Solomonoff, Oliver Selfridge, Trenchard More, Arthur Samuel, Herbert A. Simon, and Allen Newell.
He then became a graduate student of Norbert Wiener's at MIT, but did not write up his doctoral research and never earned a Ph.D. Marvin Minsky considered Selfridge to be one of his mentors, and, Selfridge was one of the 11 attendees, with Marvin Minsky, of the Dartmouth workshop that is considered to be the founding event of artificial intelligence as a field.

Trenchard More

According to Stottler Henke Associates, besides the proposal's authors, attendees at the conference included Ray Solomonoff, Oliver Selfridge, Trenchard More, Arthur Samuel, Herbert A. Simon, and Allen Newell.
He participated in the 1956 Dartmouth Summer Research Project on Artificial Intelligence.

Ray Solomonoff

SolomonoffSolomonoff, Ray
According to Stottler Henke Associates, besides the proposal's authors, attendees at the conference included Ray Solomonoff, Oliver Selfridge, Trenchard More, Arthur Samuel, Herbert A. Simon, and Allen Newell.
In 1956 Minsky and McCarthy and others organized the Dartmouth Summer Research Conference on Artificial Intelligence, where Ray was one of the original 10 invitees—he, McCarthy, and Minsky were the only ones to stay all summer.

Allen Newell

NewellNewell, AllenAllen Newell Award
According to Stottler Henke Associates, besides the proposal's authors, attendees at the conference included Ray Solomonoff, Oliver Selfridge, Trenchard More, Arthur Samuel, Herbert A. Simon, and Allen Newell.
They presented the program at the Dartmouth conference of 1956, an informal gathering of researchers who were interested in simulating intelligence with machines.

History of artificial intelligence

21st CenturyDartmouth Conferencehistory of AI
The field of AI research was founded at a workshop held on the campus of Dartmouth College during the summer of 1956.

AI@50

AI@50, formally known as the "Dartmouth Artificial Intelligence Conference: The Next Fifty Years" (July 13–15, 2006), was a conference organized by James Moor, commemorating the 50th anniversary of the Dartmouth workshop which effectively inaugurated the history of artificial intelligence.

Brainstorming

brainstormbrain-stormingbrainstormed
The project lasted approximately six to eight weeks, and was essentially an extended brainstorming session.

Norbert Wiener

WienerWiener, NorbertN. Wiener
He chose the name partly for its neutrality; avoiding a focus on narrow automata theory, and avoiding cybernetics which was heavily focused on analog feedback, as well as him potentially having to accept the assertive Norbert Wiener as guru or having to argue with him.

Rockefeller Foundation

Rockefeller FellowshipRockefellerThe Rockefeller Foundation
In early 1955, McCarthy approached the Rockefeller Foundation to request funding for a summer seminar at Dartmouth for about 10 participants.

Claude Shannon

Claude E. ShannonShannonClaude Elwood Shannon
On September 2, 1955, the project was formally proposed by McCarthy, Marvin Minsky, Nathaniel Rochester and Claude Shannon. In June, he and Claude Shannon, a founder of information theory then at Bell Labs, met with Robert Morison, Director of Biological and Medical Research to discuss the idea and possible funding, though Morison was unsure whether money would be made available for such a visionary project.

Information theory

information-theoreticinformation theoristinformation
In June, he and Claude Shannon, a founder of information theory then at Bell Labs, met with Robert Morison, Director of Biological and Medical Research to discuss the idea and possible funding, though Morison was unsure whether money would be made available for such a visionary project.

Bell Labs

Bell LaboratoriesBell Telephone LaboratoriesAT&T Bell Laboratories
In June, he and Claude Shannon, a founder of information theory then at Bell Labs, met with Robert Morison, Director of Biological and Medical Research to discuss the idea and possible funding, though Morison was unsure whether money would be made available for such a visionary project.

Marvin Minsky

MinskyMarvin L. Minskyartificial intelligence
On September 2, 1955, the project was formally proposed by McCarthy, Marvin Minsky, Nathaniel Rochester and Claude Shannon.

Computer

computerscomputer systemdigital computer
The proposal goes on to discuss computers, natural language processing, neural networks, theory of computation, abstraction and creativity (these areas within the field of artificial intelligence are considered still relevant to the work of the field).

Natural language processing

NLPnatural languagenatural-language processing
The proposal goes on to discuss computers, natural language processing, neural networks, theory of computation, abstraction and creativity (these areas within the field of artificial intelligence are considered still relevant to the work of the field).

Neural network

neural networksnetworksnetwork
The proposal goes on to discuss computers, natural language processing, neural networks, theory of computation, abstraction and creativity (these areas within the field of artificial intelligence are considered still relevant to the work of the field).

Theory of computation

computational theoristcomputational theorycomputation theory
The proposal goes on to discuss computers, natural language processing, neural networks, theory of computation, abstraction and creativity (these areas within the field of artificial intelligence are considered still relevant to the work of the field).

Abstraction

abstractabstract thinkingabstractions
The proposal goes on to discuss computers, natural language processing, neural networks, theory of computation, abstraction and creativity (these areas within the field of artificial intelligence are considered still relevant to the work of the field).

Creativity

creativecreative processcreative thinking
The proposal goes on to discuss computers, natural language processing, neural networks, theory of computation, abstraction and creativity (these areas within the field of artificial intelligence are considered still relevant to the work of the field).

Stottler Henke Associates

According to Stottler Henke Associates, besides the proposal's authors, attendees at the conference included Ray Solomonoff, Oliver Selfridge, Trenchard More, Arthur Samuel, Herbert A. Simon, and Allen Newell.