Daughters of the American Revolution

DAR Constitution Hall, Washington, DC
The Founders of the Daughters of the American Revolution sculpture honors the four founders of the DAR.
Julia Green Scott in 1913, DAR President General
This Daughters of the American Revolution tablet erected in 1926 in Old Allentown Cemetery in Allentown, Pennsylvania honors Allentown patriots from the American Revolution, many of whom are buried in the cemetery.
Daughters of the American Revolution monument to the Battle of Fort Washington, erected in 1910. The approach deck of the George Washington Bridge, New York City was built above it.
Caroline Scott Harrison, First DAR President General
Southern Woman Named DAR President General
Silver Arrow, the symbol of the Dillon administration in the form of a pin.

Lineage-based membership service organization for women who are directly descended from a person involved in the United States' efforts towards independence.

- Daughters of the American Revolution

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Sons of the American Revolution

American congressionally chartered organization, founded in 1889 and headquartered in Louisville, Kentucky.

Logo used by the SAR
Logo used by the SAR
Philadelphia Continental Chapter of the SAR at a ceremony commemorating the birth of General and President George Washington at the Tomb of the Unknown Revolutionary War Soldier in Washington Square, Philadelphia
Theodore Roosevelt, a member of the organization, signed its Congressional Charter in 1906
Sons of the American Revolution grave marker, Old Ship Burying Ground, Hingham, Massachusetts
Horace Porter, U.S. Ambassador to France, served as President-General of the Sons of the American Revolution from 1892 to 1897.
Indiana Society SAR Color Guard appearing with the recreated 19th US Infantry at an outdoor Fourth of July concert with the Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra.

In addition to organizing the SAR, McDowell worked with six women to organize the National Society Daughters of the American Revolution on July 29, 1890.

Genealogy

Study of families, family history, and the tracing of their lineages.

The family tree of Louis III, Duke of Württemberg (ruled 1568–1593)
The family tree of "the Landas", a 17th-century family
12 generations patrilineage of a Hindu Lingayat male from central Karnataka spanning over 275 years, depicted in descending order
A Medieval genealogy traced from Adam and Eve
Variations of VNTR allele lengths in six individuals
Gramps is an example of genealogy software.
A family history page from an antebellum era family Bible
The Family History Library, operated by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, is the world's largest library dedicated to genealogical research.
Lineage of a family, c. 1809

Establishing descent from these was, and is, important to lineage societies, such as the Daughters of the American Revolution and The General Society of Mayflower Descendants.

Colonial Dames of America

American organization composed of women who are descended from an ancestor who lived in British America from 1607 to 1775, and was of service to the colonies by either holding public office, being in the military, or serving the Colonies in some other "eligible" way.

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National Headquarters at Mount Vernon Hotel Museum in New York City

The organization was founded in 1890, shortly before the founding of two similar societies, The National Society of the Colonial Dames of America and the Daughters of the American Revolution.

Caroline Harrison

Music teacher and the first wife of President Benjamin Harrison.

Benjamin Harrison c1850
Official White House portrait
Dog house and resident Dash

Interested in history and preservation, in 1890 she helped found the National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR) and served as its first President General.

Marian Anderson

American contralto.

Marian Anderson in 1940, by Carl Van Vechten
Anderson in 1920
Anderson in her 1939 concert at the Lincoln Memorial
Anderson at the Lincoln Memorial
Mitchell Jamieson's 1943 mural An Incident in Contemporary American Life, at the United States Department of the Interior Building, depicts the scene of Anderson's concert at the Lincoln Memorial
Marian Anderson greeting members of the audience at the ceremony held in the auditorium of the U.S. Department of the Interior, 1943
Anderson at the Department of the Interior in 1943, commemorating her 1939 concert
Anderson christens Liberty ship SS Booker T. Washington, 1942
Painting by Betsy Graves Reyneau
Anderson entertains a group of overseas veterans and WACs on the stage of the San Antonio Municipal Auditorium, 1945.
Marian Anderson gravestone in Eden Cemetery
Sculpture of Anderson, Converse College, South Carolina

In 1939 during the era of racial segregation, the Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR) refused to allow Anderson to sing to an integrated audience in Constitution Hall in Washington, D.C. The incident placed Anderson in the spotlight of the international community on a level unusual for a classical musician.

Mary Smith Lockwood

Mary S. Lockwood, 1907
The Founders of the Daughters of the American Revolution honors Lockwood and the other co-founders of the DAR.

Mary Smith Lockwood (1831–1922) was one of the founders of the Daughters of the American Revolution.

DAR Constitution Hall

DAR Constitution Hall in 2008

DAR Constitution Hall is a concert hall located at 1776 D Street NW, near the White House in Washington, D.C. It was built in 1929 by the Daughters of the American Revolution to house its annual convention when membership delegations outgrew Memorial Continental Hall.

Ellen Hardin Walworth

American author, lawyer, and activist who was a passionate advocate for the importance of studying history and historic preservation.

Portail of the death of Walworth's father, John J. Hardin, at the Battle of Buena Vista.
Reubena Hyde "Ruby" Walworth
The Founders of the Daughters of the American Revolution honors Walworth and the other co-founders of the DAR.

Walworth was one of the founders of the Daughters of the American Revolution and was the organization's first secretary general.

Lincoln Memorial

U.S. national memorial built to honor the 16th president of the United States, Abraham Lincoln.

Aerial view of the Lincoln Memorial, 2010
Future site of the Memorial, c.1912
President Warren G. Harding speaking at the dedication, 1922
Chief Justice Taft, President Harding and Robert Todd Lincoln at the dedication of the Lincoln Memorial, 30 May 1922
Detail of the Memorial's friezes
President Barack Obama, First Lady Michelle Obama, and former Presidents Jimmy Carter and Bill Clinton walk past President Lincoln's statue to participate in the 2013 50th anniversary ceremony of the historic March on Washington and Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.'s "I Have a Dream" speech
The sculptor's possible use of sign language is speculated, as the statue's left hand forms an "A" while the right hand portrays an "L"
The March on Washington in 1963 brought 250,000 people to the National Mall and is famous for Martin Luther King Jr.'s "I Have a Dream" speech.
The location on the steps where King delivered the speech is commemorated with this inscription.

In 1939, the Daughters of the American Revolution refused to allow the African-American contralto Marian Anderson to perform before an integrated audience at the organization's Constitution Hall.

Tammy Duckworth

American politician and retired Army National Guard lieutenant colonel serving as the junior United States senator from Illinois since 2017.

Duckworth in 2017
Captain Duckworth in 2000
Duckworth with Senators Barack Obama and Daniel Akaka in 2005 at a Veterans Affairs hearing
Duckworth being sworn in as Assistant Secretary of Public and Intergovernmental Affairs for the United States Department of Veterans Affairs, by Judge John J. Farley with her husband Bryan Bowlsbey beside her
Duckworth as a U.S. representative during the 113th congress
Senate Diversity Initiative in support of diversity in the Senate and its staff, June 21, 2017
Stop Kavanaugh press conference on September 6, 2018
Duckworth narrates the Salute to Fallen Asian Pacific Islander Heroes in Arlington, Virginia, June 2, 2005.

In 2011 the Daughters of the American Revolution erected a statue with Duckworth's likeness and that of Molly Pitcher in Mount Vernon, Illinois.