David J. Saposs

David Saposs
David Joseph Saposs (February 22, 1886 – November 13, 1968) was an American economist, historian, and civil servant.wikipedia
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National Labor Relations Board

NLRBChairman of the National Labor Relations BoardNational Labor Board
He is best known for being the chief economist of the National Labor Relations Board from 1935 to 1940.

Selig Perlman

While in the doctoral program at Wisconsin, Saposs was a student of the nationally known labor economist John R. Commons and a close friend of fellow student Selig Perlman (who later became a nationally known labor economist in his own right).
His roommate was David J. Saposs, later to become a noted historian, and a close friend was Edwin E. Witte.

Brookwood Labor College

Brookwood School
In 1922, Saposs was appointed an instructor at Brookwood Labor College, but left after two years to do post-graduate work in economics and labor history at Columbia University.

American University School of International Service

School of International ServiceAmerican University’sCenter for Peacebuilding and Development
In 1959, he was appointed Professor of American and International Labor in the School of International Service at American University in Washington, D.C.

Kiev

KyivKiev, UkraineKyiv, Ukraine
David Saposnik was born on February 22, 1886, in the city of Kiev in the Russian Empire.

Russian Empire

RussiaImperial RussiaRussian
David Saposnik was born on February 22, 1886, in the city of Kiev in the Russian Empire.

Jews

JewishJewJewish people
The Jewish family settled in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

Milwaukee

Milwaukee, WisconsinMilwaukee, WICity of Milwaukee
The Jewish family settled in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

Wisconsin

WIState of WisconsinGeography of Wisconsin
The Jewish family settled in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

Brewery

breweriesbrewing companybrewmaster
David quit school in the fifth grade and worked in beer breweries in his teens to help support his family.

Shop steward

shop stewardschapter leaderdelegate
In 1906, at the age of 20, he was elected shop steward for the local [[International Union of United Brewery, Flour, Cereal, Soft Drink and Distillery Workers|brewery workers' union]].

International Union of United Brewery, Flour, Cereal, Soft Drink and Distillery Workers

United Brewery WorkersBrewery WorkersBrewery Workers Union
In 1906, at the age of 20, he was elected shop steward for the local [[International Union of United Brewery, Flour, Cereal, Soft Drink and Distillery Workers|brewery workers' union]].

University of Wisconsin–Madison

University of WisconsinUniversity of Wisconsin-MadisonWisconsin
Although he lacked a high school diploma, Saposs was admitted in 1907 to the University of Wisconsin (UW).

Doctor of Philosophy

Ph.D.PhDPh.D
He enrolled full-time beginning in 1913, and graduated with a Ph.D. in economics in 1915.

Economics

economiceconomisteconomic theory
He enrolled full-time beginning in 1913, and graduated with a Ph.D. in economics in 1915.

John R. Commons

John CommonsJR CommonsCommons
While in the doctoral program at Wisconsin, Saposs was a student of the nationally known labor economist John R. Commons and a close friend of fellow student Selig Perlman (who later became a nationally known labor economist in his own right).

Trade union

uniontrade unionistlabor union
He was an accident prevention investigator for the New York Department of Labor, an investigator into the role immigrants played in American labor unions for the Carnegie Corporation, investigated the Steel strike of 1919 on behalf of the Inter-Church World Movement Commission, and was Educational Director for the Amalgamated Clothing Workers Union.

Carnegie Corporation of New York

Carnegie CorporationCarnegie FoundationCarnegie Fellowship
He was an accident prevention investigator for the New York Department of Labor, an investigator into the role immigrants played in American labor unions for the Carnegie Corporation, investigated the Steel strike of 1919 on behalf of the Inter-Church World Movement Commission, and was Educational Director for the Amalgamated Clothing Workers Union.

Steel strike of 1919

Great Steel StrikeGreat Steel Strike of 19191919
He was an accident prevention investigator for the New York Department of Labor, an investigator into the role immigrants played in American labor unions for the Carnegie Corporation, investigated the Steel strike of 1919 on behalf of the Inter-Church World Movement Commission, and was Educational Director for the Amalgamated Clothing Workers Union.

Amalgamated Clothing Workers of America

Amalgamated Clothing WorkersAmalgamated Clothing and Textile Workers UnionAmalgamated Clothing Workers Union
He was an accident prevention investigator for the New York Department of Labor, an investigator into the role immigrants played in American labor unions for the Carnegie Corporation, investigated the Steel strike of 1919 on behalf of the Inter-Church World Movement Commission, and was Educational Director for the Amalgamated Clothing Workers Union.

Columbia University

ColumbiaColumbia CollegeUniversity of Columbia
In 1922, Saposs was appointed an instructor at Brookwood Labor College, but left after two years to do post-graduate work in economics and labor history at Columbia University.

The Century Foundation

Century FoundationTwentieth Century FundThe Twentieth Century Fund
In 1924, Saposs became research director for the Twentieth Century Fund's newly founded labor unit.

Supreme Court of the United States

United States Supreme CourtU.S. Supreme CourtSupreme Court
The research conducted under Saposs' leadership proved critical to winning over the Supreme Court of the United States, which held in National Labor Relations Board v. Jones & Laughlin Steel Corporation, 301 U.S. 1 (1938) that the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA) was constitutional.

NLRB v. Jones & Laughlin Steel Corp.

National Labor Relations Board v. Jones & Laughlin Steel CorporationNLRB v. Jones & Laughlin Steel CorpNLRB v. Jones & Laughlin Steel Corporation
The research conducted under Saposs' leadership proved critical to winning over the Supreme Court of the United States, which held in National Labor Relations Board v. Jones & Laughlin Steel Corporation, 301 U.S. 1 (1938) that the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA) was constitutional.

National Labor Relations Act of 1935

National Labor Relations ActWagner ActNational Labor Relations Act 1935
The research conducted under Saposs' leadership proved critical to winning over the Supreme Court of the United States, which held in National Labor Relations Board v. Jones & Laughlin Steel Corporation, 301 U.S. 1 (1938) that the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA) was constitutional.