David Lloyd George

Lloyd GeorgeRt Hon. David Lloyd GeorgeBritish Prime Minister David Lloyd GeorgeDavid Lloyd George, 1st Earl Lloyd-George of Dwyfor1st Earl Lloyd-George of DwyforDavidDavid Lloyd George OM MPDavid Lloyd George, 1st Earl Lloyd George of DwyforDavid-Lloyd-GeorgeDetails
David Lloyd George, 1st Earl Lloyd-George of Dwyfor, (17 January 1863 – 26 March 1945) was a British statesman and Liberal Party politician.wikipedia
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Lloyd George ministry

coalition governmentCoalitionCoalition Liberal
His most important role came as the highly energetic Prime Minister of the Wartime Coalition Government (1916–22), during and immediately after the First World War.
Liberal David Lloyd George formed a coalition government in the United Kingdom in December 1916, and was appointed Prime Minister of the United Kingdom by King George V.

Liberal Party (UK)

LiberalLiberal PartyLiberals
David Lloyd George, 1st Earl Lloyd-George of Dwyfor, (17 January 1863 – 26 March 1945) was a British statesman and Liberal Party politician. By then he was politically active, having campaigned for the Liberal Party in the 1885 election, attracted by Joseph Chamberlain's "unauthorised programme" of reforms.
Although Asquith was the party's leader, its dominant figure was David Lloyd George.

Paris Peace Conference, 1919

Paris Peace Conference1919 Paris Peace ConferenceParis Peace Conference of 1919
He was a major player at the Paris Peace Conference of 1919 that reordered Europe after the defeat of the Central Powers.
And the "Big Four" were the Prime Minister of France, Georges Clemenceau; the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, David Lloyd George; the President of the United States, Woodrow Wilson; and the Prime Minister of Italy, Vittorio Emanuele Orlando.

Historical rankings of Prime Ministers of the United Kingdom

2016 surveyBritish prime ministersgenerally rank him in the upper half
He was voted the third greatest British prime minister of the 20th century in a poll of 139 academics organised by MORI, and in 2002 he was named among the 100 Greatest Britons following a UK-wide vote.
2) Lloyd George (Lib)

Margaret Lloyd George

Margaret OwenMargaretMrs Lloyd George
He married Margaret Owen, the daughter of a well-to-do local farming family, on 24 January 1888.
Dame Margaret Lloyd George (née Owen; 4 November 1864 – 20 January 1941) was the wife of British statesman David Lloyd George from 1888 until her death in 1941.

Chancellor of the Exchequer

ChancellorChancellors of the ExchequerSpokesperson for the Treasury
As Chancellor of the Exchequer (1908–1915) during H. H. Asquith's tenure as Prime Minister, Lloyd George was a key figure in the introduction of many reforms which laid the foundations of the modern welfare state.
According to George Osborne, the robe (dating from Gladstone's time in office, and worn by the likes of Lloyd George and Churchill) 'went missing' during Gordon Brown's time as chancellor.

Caernarfon (UK Parliament constituency)

CaernarfonCarnarvonCaernarvon Boroughs
It was this case, which was hailed as a great victory throughout Wales, and his writings in Udgorn Rhyddid that led to his adoption as the Liberal candidate for Carnarvon Boroughs on 27 December 1888.
Its most famous member was David Lloyd George, who was MP for 55 years.

People's Budget

budget1909 budget1909–10 budget
This strongly influenced Lloyd George's politics later in life; the People's Budget drew heavily on Georgist tax reform ideas.
It was championed by the Chancellor of the Exchequer, David Lloyd George, and his young ally Winston Churchill, who was then President of the Board of Trade and a fellow Liberal; called the "Terrible Twins" by certain Conservative contemporaries.

Conservative Party (UK)

ConservativeConservative PartyConservatives
The election resulted firstly in a stalemate with neither the Liberals nor the Conservatives having a majority, the balance of power being held by the Irish Parliamentary Party.
In late 1916 Liberal David Lloyd George became prime minister but the Liberals soon split and the Conservatives dominated the government, especially after their landslide in the 1918 election. The Liberal party never recovered, but Labour gained strength after 1920.

Criccieth

Criccieth Urban DistrictCricieth
As backbench members of the House of Commons were not paid at that time, he supported himself and his growing family by continuing to practise as a solicitor, opening an office in London under the name of 'Lloyd George and Co.' and continuing in partnership with William George in Criccieth.
Famous people associated with the town include the British prime minister, David Lloyd George, who grew up in the nearby village of Llanystumdwy, and poet William George.

Newport, Wales

NewportNewport, MonmouthshireNewport, South Wales
He abandoned this idea after being criticised in Welsh newspapers for bringing about the defeat of the Liberal Party in the 1895 election and, at a meeting in Newport on 16 January 1896 of the South Wales Liberal Federation, led by D. A. Thomas, he was shouted down.
It was at a meeting in Newport, attended by future Prime Minister David Lloyd George, that the Cymru Fydd movement received its death blow in 1896 when politician Robert Bird stated “You will find, from Swansea to Newport, a cosmopolitan population who will not submit to the domination of Welsh ideas!”.

Arthur Balfour

BalfourLord BalfourA.J. Balfour
Arthur Balfour denounced the budget as "vindictive, inequitable, based on no principles, and injurious to the productive capacity of the country."
As Foreign Secretary under David Lloyd George, he issued the Balfour Declaration in November 1917 on behalf of the cabinet.

The Guardian

GuardianThe Manchester GuardianManchester Guardian
He wrote extensively for Liberal papers such as the Manchester Guardian.
Scott supported the movement for women's suffrage, but was critical of any tactics by the Suffragettes that involved direct action: "The really ludicrous position is that Mr Lloyd George is fighting to enfranchise seven million women and the militants are smashing unoffending people's windows and breaking up benevolent societies' meetings in a desperate effort to prevent him."

Agadir Crisis

Second Moroccan CrisisAgadircrisis over Morocco
Lloyd George was considered an opponent of war until the Agadir Crisis of 1911, during which he gave a stirring and patriotic speech at Mansion House on 21 July 1911.
David Lloyd George made a dramatic "Mansion House" speech that denounced the German move as an intolerable humiliation.

Sir William Robertson, 1st Baronet

William RobertsonRobertsonSir William Robertson
These suggestions began a period of poor relations with the Chief of the Imperial General Staff, General Robertson, who was "brusque to the point of rudeness" and "barely concealed his contempt for Lloyd George's military opinions", to which he was in the habit of retorting "I've 'eard different".
While CIGS, Robertson had increasingly poor relations with David Lloyd George, Secretary of State for War and then Prime Minister, and threatened resignation at Lloyd George's attempt to subordinate the British forces to the French Commander-in-Chief, Robert Nivelle.

38th (Welsh) Infantry Division

38th (Welsh) Division38th Infantry (Reserve) Division38th Division
Lloyd George persuaded Kitchener, the Secretary of State for War, to raise a Welsh Division, and, despite Kitchener's threat of resignation, to recognise nonconformist chaplains in the Army.
In 1914, the division was raised as the 43rd Division of Herbert Kitchener's New Army, and was originally intended to form part of a 50,000-strong Welsh Army Corps that had been championed by David Lloyd George; the assignment of Welsh recruits to other formations meant that this concept was never realised.

Asquith coalition ministry

Asquith Coalitioncoalition governmentCoalition
In the first coalition ministry, formed in May 1915, Lloyd George was made Minister of Munitions, heading a new department.
Asquith and most of the Liberals then moved into opposition, while the Conservatives formed a new coalition with a minority of Liberals, under the leadership of Liberal David Lloyd George, the next day.

National Insurance Act 1911

National Insurance ActNational InsuranceNational Insurance Act of 1911
Lloyd George also succeeded in putting through Parliament his National Insurance Act 1911, making provision for sickness and invalidism, and a system of unemployment insurance.
David Lloyd George, the Liberal Chancellor of the Exchequer, was the prime moving force behind its design, negotiations with doctors and other interest groups, and final passage.

Herbert Lewis

John Herbert LewisLewis, HerbertSir Herbert Lewis
When that was not forthcoming, he and three other Welsh Liberals (D. A. Thomas, Herbert Lewis and Frank Edwards) refused the whip on 14 April 1894, but accepted Lord Rosebery's assurance and rejoined the official Liberals on 29 May.
In 1894, he resigned the Liberal Whip in the so-called 'Welsh Revolt', joining David Alfred Thomas, David Lloyd George and Frank Edwards.

Joseph Chamberlain

ChamberlainJoseph The Right Honourable '''Joseph Chamberlain
By then he was politically active, having campaigned for the Liberal Party in the 1885 election, attracted by Joseph Chamberlain's "unauthorised programme" of reforms.
Chamberlain's campaign attracted large crowds and enthralled the young James Ramsay MacDonald and David Lloyd George, but disconcerted leading Liberals like Goschen who called it the "Unauthorised Programme".

Merchant Shipping Act 1906

1906merchant shipping
In that position he introduced legislation on many topics, from merchant shipping and the Port of London to companies and railway regulation.
Introduced in 1906 by David Lloyd George, then President of the Board of Trade, the Merchant Shipping Act established regulations covering the standards of food and accommodation on British registered ships.

Alfred Milner, 1st Viscount Milner

Lord MilnerAlfred MilnerSir Alfred Milner
In spring 1916, Alfred Milner hoped Lloyd George could be persuaded to bring down the coalition government by resigning, but this did not happen. After December 1916, Lloyd George relied on the support of Conservatives and of the press baron Lord Northcliffe (who owned both The Times and the Daily Mail). Besides the Prime Minister, the five-member War Cabinet contained three Conservatives (Lord President of the Council and Leader of the House of Lords Lord Curzon, Chancellor of the Exchequer and Leader of the House of Commons Bonar Law, and Minister without Portfolio Lord Milner) and Arthur Henderson, unofficially representing Labour.
From December 1916 to November 1918, he was one of the most important members of David Lloyd George's War Cabinet.

Llanystumdwy

Llanystymdwy
He took up farming but died in June 1864 of pneumonia, aged 44. His widow, Elizabeth George (1828–96), sold the farm and moved with her children to her native Llanystumdwy in Caernarfonshire, where she lived in a cottage known as Highgate with her brother Richard Lloyd (1834–1917), who was a shoemaker, a minister (in the Scottish Baptists and then the Church of Christ), and a strong Liberal.
The village is where David Lloyd George, the former British Prime Minister, and the last Liberal Party leader to be prime minister, lived until he was 16, and where he picked up his political nous and hatred of the land-owning aristocracy from his lay preacher uncle.

War cabinet

British War CabinetWar Cabinet OfficeAustralian War Cabinet
After December 1916, Lloyd George relied on the support of Conservatives and of the press baron Lord Northcliffe (who owned both The Times and the Daily Mail). Besides the Prime Minister, the five-member War Cabinet contained three Conservatives (Lord President of the Council and Leader of the House of Lords Lord Curzon, Chancellor of the Exchequer and Leader of the House of Commons Bonar Law, and Minister without Portfolio Lord Milner) and Arthur Henderson, unofficially representing Labour.
In December 1916 it was proposed that the Prime Minister H. H. Asquith should delegate decision-making to a small, three-man committee chaired by the Secretary of State for War, David Lloyd George.

Prime Minister of the United Kingdom

Prime MinisterBritish Prime MinisterUK Prime Minister
He was the final Liberal to serve as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom.
A prime minister need not be a party leader; David Lloyd George was not a party leader during his service as prime Minister during World War I, and neither was Ramsay MacDonald from 1931 to 1935.