Dayton, Tennessee

The Rhea County courthouse is home of the famous "Monkey Trial".
Downtown Dayton, 1925

City and county seat in Rhea County, Tennessee, United States.

- Dayton, Tennessee

111 related topics

Relevance

John T. Scopes

Scopes in 1925
c. 1925

John Thomas Scopes (August 3, 1900 – October 21, 1970) was a teacher in Dayton, Tennessee, who was charged on May 5, 1925 with violating Tennessee's Butler Act, which prohibited the teaching of human evolution in Tennessee schools.

Butler Act

1925 Tennessee law prohibiting public school teachers from denying the Biblical account of mankind's origin.

The law was challenged later that year in a famous trial in Dayton, Tennessee called the Scopes Trial which included a raucous confrontation between prosecution attorney and fundamentalist religious leader, William Jennings Bryan, and noted defense attorney and religious agnostic, Clarence Darrow.

Scopes Trial

American legal case from July 10 to July 21, 1925 in which a high school teacher, John T. Scopes, was accused of violating Tennessee's Butler Act, which had made it unlawful to teach human evolution in any state-funded school.

John Scopes
Clarence Darrow in 1925, during the trial
H. L. Mencken in 1928
William Jennings Bryan in 1925
Darrow (left) and Bryan (right) during the trial
The Rhea County Courthouse is a National Historic Landmark.
Cartoonist Rollin Kirby depicts fundamentalist education in Tennessee taken to an extreme
Spencer Tracy (left) as Darrow surrogate Henry Drummond, and Fredric March (right) as Bryan surrogate Matthew Harrison Brady in the trailer for the film Inherit the Wind; Harry Morgan (in the background) plays the judge.

The trial was deliberately staged in order to attract publicity to the small town of Dayton, Tennessee, where it was held.

Rhea County, Tennessee

County located in the U.S. state of Tennessee.

The cooling towers of Watts Bar Nuclear Generating Station, with the Tennessee River in the foreground
View of Dayton from Cedar Glen Lane

Its county seat is Dayton.

Clarence Darrow

American lawyer who became famous in the early 20th century for his involvement in the Leopold and Loeb murder trial and the Scopes "Monkey" Trial.

Darrow in 1922
Clarence Darrow in 1902
Darrow in 1913
Clarence Darrow c. 1925
Henry Drummond (left), a fictionalized version of Clarence Darrow, as portrayed by Spencer Tracy in Inherit the Wind.

A statue of Darrow stands outside the Rhea County Courthouse in Dayton, Tennessee, site of the 1925 Scopes Trial. The statue was erected on July 14, 2017, and stands just a few feet away from a statue of Darrow's Scopes Trial opponent, William Jennings Bryan, erected in 2005.

Jake Gaither

American football coach and college athletics administrator.

Coach Jake Gaither (standing, middle, white shirt with whistle) in the locker room with his Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University (FAMU) football team: Tallahassee, Florida, 1953

Gaither was born in 1903 in Dayton, Tennessee.

Tennessee

State in the Southeastern region of the United States.

Detail of Tanasi (spelled "Tennessee") on Henry Timberlake's [[:File:Draught of the Cherokee Country.jpg|Draught of the Cherokee Country]]
Reconstruction of Fort Loudoun, the first British settlement in Tennessee
The Southwest Territory in 1790
Surveyor Daniel Smith's "Map of the Tennassee State" (1796)
The Hermitage, plantation home of President Andrew Jackson in Nashville
The Battle of Franklin, November 30, 1864
Memphis became known as the "Cotton Capital of the World" in the years following the Civil War
Workers at the Norris Dam construction camp site in 1933
Calutron operators at the Y-12 Plant in Oak Ridge during the Manhattan Project
The 1982 World's Fair in Knoxville
The Ocoee River was home to the 1996 Summer Olympics whitewater slalom events, the only Olympic sporting event ever held in the state.
Mount Le Conte in the Great Smoky Mountains is the tallest mountain in eastern North America, measured from base to summit
Fall Creek Falls, the tallest waterfall in the eastern United States, is located on the Cumberland Plateau
Reelfoot Lake in West Tennessee was formed by the 1811–1812 New Madrid earthquakes
Cedar glades are an extremely rare ecosystem that is found in regions of Middle Tennessee where limestone bedrock is close to the surface
Köppen climate types of Tennessee, using 1991-2020 climate normals.
A geomap showing the counties of Tennessee colored by the relative range of that county's median income.
Chart showing poverty in Tennessee, by age and gender (red = female)
A Nissan Leaf, one of six models manufactured at the Nissan Smyrna Assembly Plant, the largest automotive assembly plant in North America
Established in 1942, Oak Ridge National Laboratory is the largest national laboratory in the Department of Energy system
Norris Dam, a hydroelectric dam operated by the Tennessee Valley Authority.
The resort city of Gatlinburg borders the Great Smoky Mountains National Park, which is the most visited national park in the United States.
The Grand Ole Opry, which was recorded in Nashville's Ryman Auditorium from 1943 to 1974, is the longest-running radio broadcast in US history.
Vanderbilt University in Nashville is consistently ranked as one of the top research institutions in the nation
Offices of The Tennessean in Nashville
Interstate 40 traverses Tennessee from east to west, and serves the state's three largest cities.
Memphis International Airport, the hub of FedEx Corporation, is the busiest cargo airport in the world
Tennessee State Capitol in Nashville
Al Gore served as a United States Senator from Tennessee (1985-1993) and as Vice President of the United States (1993-2001)
Howard Baker served as Senate Minority and Majority Leader from 1977 to 1985, and was known as "The Great Conciliator"
Tennessee Volunteers football

In 1925, John T. Scopes, a high school teacher in Dayton, was tried and convicted for teaching evolution in violation of the state's recently passed Butler Act.

William Jennings Bryan

American lawyer, orator and politician.

Bryan's birthplace in Salem, Illinois
Attorney Mary Baird Bryan, the wife of William Jennings Bryan
A young Bryan
"UNITED SNAKES OF AMERICA" "IN BRYAN WE TRUST" political satire token of 1896, known as "Bryan Money"
Bryan campaigning for president, October 1896
1896 electoral vote results
The United States and its colonial possessions after the Spanish–American War
Conservatives in 1900 ridiculed Bryan's eclectic platform.
1900 electoral vote results
William J Bryan in 1906 as Moses with new 10 commandments; Puck 19 sept 1906 by Joseph Keppler. Tablet reads: l-Thou shalt have no other leaders before me. II—Thou shalt not make unto thyself any high Protective Tariff. Ill—Eight hours, and no more, shalt thou labor and do all thy work. IV—Thou shalt not graft. V—Thou shalt not elect thy Senators save by Popular Vote. VI—Thou shalt not grant rebates unto thy neighbor. VII—Thou shalt not make combinations in restraint of trade. VIII—Thou shalt not covet thy neighbor's income, but shall make him pay a tax upon it. IX—There shall be no more government by injunction. X—Remember Election Day to vote it early. P.S.— When in doubt, ask Me.
Bryan speaking at the 1908 Democratic National Convention
Presidential Campaign button for Bryan
1908 electoral vote results
Bryan attending the 1912 Democratic National Convention
Bryan served as Secretary of State under President Woodrow Wilson
Cartoon of Secretary of State Bryan reading war news in 1914
Villa Serena, Bryan's home built in 1913 at Miami, Florida
Charles W. and William J. Bryan
At the Scopes Trial, William Jennings Bryan (seated, left) being questioned by Clarence Darrow (standing, right).
Statue of Bryan on the lawn of the Rhea County courthouse in Dayton, Tennessee

The defendant, John T. Scopes, had violated the Butler Act while serving as a substitute biology teacher in Dayton, Tennessee.

Russ Hodges

American sportscaster who did play-by-play for several baseball teams, most notably the New York/San Francisco Giants.

Russ Hodges in 1955

Born in Dayton, Tennessee, Hodges began his broadcasting career in 1934.

Bryan College

Harvard University, an Ivy League university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, routinely ranks as the best, or one of the best, private universities in the world.

Bryan College is a private Christian college in Dayton, Tennessee.