De Havilland Canada DHC-5 Buffalo

CC-115 BuffaloDHC-5 Buffalode Havilland Canada DHC-5D BuffaloBuffaloC-115 BuffaloC-8de Havilland Canada BuffaloDe Havilland Canada C-8 BuffaloDe Havilland Canada CC-115 BuffaloAC-2 Buffalo
The de Havilland Canada DHC-5 Buffalo is a short takeoff and landing (STOL) utility transport turboprop aircraft developed from the earlier piston-powered DHC-4 Caribou.wikipedia
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Fairchild C-123 Provider

C-123C-123 ProviderFairchild C-123K Provider
No further US orders followed, however, as at the start of 1967 (See the Johnson-McConnell agreement of 1966), inter-service politics led to large fixed-wing transports being transferred to the United States Air Force, who considered themselves adequately equipped with the Fairchild Aircraft C-123 Provider.
The C-123 was nearly ignored by the USAF for service in Vietnam, but a political rivalry with the U.S. Army and the Army's use of the CV-2 Caribou and later pre-production order for the de Havilland Canada C-8 Buffalo, led to a decision to deploy C-123s there.

Turboprop

turboprop engineturbo-propturboprops
The de Havilland Canada DHC-5 Buffalo is a short takeoff and landing (STOL) utility transport turboprop aircraft developed from the earlier piston-powered DHC-4 Caribou. De Havilland Canada based its design to meet the requirement on an enlarged version of its DHC-4 Caribou, already in large-scale service with the United States Army, to be powered by General Electric T64 turboprops rather than the Pratt & Whitney R-2000 piston engines of the Caribou.

Johnson-McConnell agreement of 1966

No further US orders followed, however, as at the start of 1967 (See the Johnson-McConnell agreement of 1966), inter-service politics led to large fixed-wing transports being transferred to the United States Air Force, who considered themselves adequately equipped with the Fairchild Aircraft C-123 Provider.
By the end of 1965, there were 88 Caribou aircraft in Vietnam, and the Army was considering a proposal to procure 120 CV-7 Buffalo aircraft – something the Air Force viewed as a costly duplication of the C-123.

Buffalo 461

a Canadian peacekeeping aircraftaircraftBuffalo 115461
On 9 August 1974, Canadian Forces CC-115 Buffalo 115461 was shot down by a Syrian surface-to-air missile, killing all nine CF personnel on board.
Buffalo 461 was a Canadian military de Havilland Canada DHC-5 Buffalo assigned to the second United Nations Emergency Force force in Syria in support of United Nations Security Council Resolution 340.

Viking Air

VikingViking Air DHC-6-400 Twin Otter
On February 24, 2006, Viking Air of Victoria, British Columbia, a manufacturer of replacement parts for all out-of-production de Havilland Canada aircraft, purchased the type certificates from Bombardier Aerospace for all versions of the DHC-1 through DHC-7 series aircraft, giving Viking exclusive rights to manufacture and sell new aircraft of those types.
On February 24, 2006, Viking purchased the type certificates from Bombardier for all the discontinued de Havilland Canada designs: the DHC-1 Chipmunk, DHC-2 Beaver, DHC-3 Otter, DHC-4 Caribou, DHC-5 Buffalo, DHC-6 Twin Otter and DHC-7 Dash 7.

General Electric T64

T64CT64T-64
De Havilland Canada based its design to meet the requirement on an enlarged version of its DHC-4 Caribou, already in large-scale service with the United States Army, to be powered by General Electric T64 turboprops rather than the Pratt & Whitney R-2000 piston engines of the Caribou.
de Havilland Canada DHC-5 Buffalo

Coandă effect

Coandă-effect system
Instead of the standard engines, this aircraft was powered by four prototype Avco Lycoming YF102 high-bypass turbofan engines (originally from the Northrop YA-9 program) mounted above the wing to take advantage of the Coandă effect.
Several aircraft, notably the Boeing YC-14 (the first modern type to exploit the effect), NASA's Quiet Short-Haul Research Aircraft, and the National Aerospace Laboratory of Japan's Asuka research aircraft have been built to take advantage of this effect, by mounting turbofans on the top of the wings to provide high-speed air even at low flying speeds, but to date only one aircraft has gone into production using this system to a major degree, the Antonov An-72 "Coaler." The Shin Meiwa US-1A flying boat utilizes a similar system, only it directs the propwash from its four turboprop engines over the top of the wing to generate low-speed lift.

Royal Canadian Air Force

RCAFAir ForceAir Command
The aircraft was proposed as a replacement for the Royal Canadian Air Force fleet of existing DHC-5As but was not one of the three aircraft in the final assessment, in 2016, which selected the EADS CASA C-295.
DHC CC-115 Buffalo

Farnborough Airshow

FarnboroughFarnborough Air ShowFarnborough International Air Show
After loss of the demonstration aircraft (SN 103 C-GCTC) at the 1984 Farnborough Airshow, the project was abandoned.
In 1984, to demonstrate its short landing, a de Havilland Canada Buffalo made a steep descent but hit the runway and disintegrated without a tragic outcome.

De Havilland Canada

de Havilland Aircraft of Canadade Havillandde Havilland Aircraft Company of Canada
De Havilland Canada based its design to meet the requirement on an enlarged version of its DHC-4 Caribou, already in large-scale service with the United States Army, to be powered by General Electric T64 turboprops rather than the Pratt & Whitney R-2000 piston engines of the Caribou.

Search and rescue

SARsearch-and-rescueCombat Search and Rescue
The remaining operational Buffalos operate in the Search and Rescue role for No. 442 Squadron at CFB Comox.
442 Transport and Rescue Squadron, CFB Comox, CH-149 Cormorant & CC-115 Buffalo

De Havilland Canada DHC-4 Caribou

DHC-4 CaribouCaribouC-7 Caribou
The de Havilland Canada DHC-5 Buffalo is a short takeoff and landing (STOL) utility transport turboprop aircraft developed from the earlier piston-powered DHC-4 Caribou. De Havilland Canada based its design to meet the requirement on an enlarged version of its DHC-4 Caribou, already in large-scale service with the United States Army, to be powered by General Electric T64 turboprops rather than the Pratt & Whitney R-2000 piston engines of the Caribou.

Lycoming ALF 502

Avco Lycoming YF102LF 507ALF 502
Instead of the standard engines, this aircraft was powered by four prototype Avco Lycoming YF102 high-bypass turbofan engines (originally from the Northrop YA-9 program) mounted above the wing to take advantage of the Coandă effect.
These engines were later reused in the C-8A Quiet Short-Haul Research Aircraft (QSRA).

CFB Comox

19 Wing ComoxRCAF Station ComoxCanadian Forces Base Comox
The remaining operational Buffalos operate in the Search and Rescue role for No. 442 Squadron at CFB Comox.
Sea Island's 121 Composite Unit moved to Comox and was reorganized as 442 Transport and Rescue Squadron, flying the Grumman HU-16 Albatross fixed-wing and Piasecki H-21 helicopter, later re-equipping with the CH-113 Labrador and CC-115 Buffalo.

CFB Trenton

8 Wing TrentonTrentonTrenton, Ontario
The Buffalo was replaced by the CC-130 Hercules aircraft at search-and-rescue bases in CFB Greenwood and CFB Trenton.
Canada upgraded its transport and search and rescue fleets during the 1960s when the RCAF purchased the CC-137 Husky, CC-130 Hercules, CH-113 Labrador and CC-115 Buffalo aircraft.

EADS CASA C-295

CASA C-295C-295CASA C-295M
The aircraft was proposed as a replacement for the Royal Canadian Air Force fleet of existing DHC-5As but was not one of the three aircraft in the final assessment, in 2016, which selected the EADS CASA C-295.
The C-295 was selected in 2016 as the replacement for the Royal Canadian Air Force's DHC-5 Buffalo in the Search & Rescue role.

Northrop YA-9

YA-9YA-9AA-9
Instead of the standard engines, this aircraft was powered by four prototype Avco Lycoming YF102 high-bypass turbofan engines (originally from the Northrop YA-9 program) mounted above the wing to take advantage of the Coandă effect.
When retired, the YA-9s' custom-built engines were removed and were later mated to a C-8 Buffalo airframe as part of the NASA-Boeing joint Quiet Short-haul Research Aircraft (QSRA) study into a quiet short-haul commercial aircraft.

Cameroon Air Force

Armée de l'Air du Cameroun (Cameroon Air Force)
* Cameroon Air Force
Following that four turboprop de Havilland Canada DHC-5 Buffalos were ordered in 1981.

Mauritania Islamic Air Force

Islamic Air Force of Mauritania
* Mauritanian Air Force
During the same time two Cessna 337s and two DHC-5 Buffalo STOL transports were supplied in 1977 and 1978 with one DHC-5 crashing almost immediately and the other being returned to De Havilland Canada in 1979.

429 Transport Squadron

429 SquadronNo. 429 Squadron429 (Bison) Squadron
These were initially operated at CFB St Hubert, QC by No. 429 Squadron in a tactical aviation role as part of Mobile Command.
De Havilland Canada CC-115 Buffalo Transport aircraft

Ethiopian Airlines

EthiopianEthiopian Airlines CargoEthiopian Cargo
*Ethiopian Airlines
The DHC-5 Buffalo entered Ethiopian's fleet in the early 1980s.

CFB Greenwood

14 Wing GreenwoodCanadian Forces Base GreenwoodGreenwood
The Buffalo was replaced by the CC-130 Hercules aircraft at search-and-rescue bases in CFB Greenwood and CFB Trenton.
In 1991 the base was closed and the majority of military personnel were transferred to CFB Greenwood, with Summerside's only operational unit, 413 Squadron (successor to No. 103 RU) moving its CH-113 Labrador and CC-115 Buffalo aircraft on June 10, 1991; the Buffalo were replaced by the CC-130 Hercules shortly after 413 transferred.

426 Transport Training Squadron

426 Squadron426 Squadron Transport Training SquadronNo. 426 Squadron
No. 426 Squadron also flew the aircraft for training.

Kenya Air Force

Air forceKenyaKenyan Air Force
* Kenya Air Force (retired)