De aquaeductu

official reportDe aqaeductu urbis RomaeDe Aquis Urbis RomaeOn the Water Supply of the City of Rome
De aquaeductu (On aqueducts) is a two-book official report given to the emperor Nerva or Trajan on the state of the aqueducts of Rome, and was written by Julius Sextus Frontinus at the end of the 1st century AD.wikipedia
47 Related Articles

Roman engineering

Roman engineersengineeringengineers
It is the earliest official report of an investigation made by a distinguished citizen on Roman engineering works to have survived.
De aquaeductu is the definitive two volume treatise on 1st century aqueducts of Rome, written by Frontinus.

Frontinus

Sextus Julius FrontinusJulius FrontinusSex. Julius Frontinus
De aquaeductu (On aqueducts) is a two-book official report given to the emperor Nerva or Trajan on the state of the aqueducts of Rome, and was written by Julius Sextus Frontinus at the end of the 1st century AD.
However, he is best known to the post-Classical world as an author of technical treatises, especially De aquaeductu, dealing with the aqueducts of Rome.

Poggio Bracciolini

Gian Francesco Poggio BraccioliniPoggioBracciolini, Poggio
With the recovery of Frontinus' manuscript from the library at Monte Cassino in 1425, effected by the tireless humanist Poggio Bracciolini, details of the construction and maintenance of the Roman aqueduct system became available once more, just as Renaissance Rome began to revive and require a dependable source of pure water.
His most celebrated finds are De rerum natura, the only surviving work by Lucretius, De architectura by Vitruvius, lost orations by Cicero such as Pro Sexto Roscio, Quintilian's Institutio Oratoria, Statius' Silvae, and Silius Italicus's Punica, as well as works by several minor authors such as Frontinus' De aquaeductu, Ammianus Marcellinus, Nonius Marcellus, Probus, Flavius Caper, and Eutyches.

Roman aqueduct

aqueductaqueductsRoman aqueducts
De aquaeductu (On aqueducts) is a two-book official report given to the emperor Nerva or Trajan on the state of the aqueducts of Rome, and was written by Julius Sextus Frontinus at the end of the 1st century AD. He was well aware of the seminal work De Architectura by Vitruvius, which mentions aqueduct construction and maintenance of the channels, published in the previous century. He provides the history, sizes and discharge rates of all of the nine aqueducts of Rome at the time at which he was writing at the turn of the 1st century AD: the Aqua Marcia, Aqua Appia, Aqua Alsietina, Aqua Tepula, Anio Vetus, Anio Novus, Aqua Virgo, Aqua Claudia and Aqua Augusta.
The general Frontinus gives more detail in his official report on the problems, uses and abuses of Imperial Rome's public water supply.

Nerva

Marcus Cocceius NervaEmperor NervaAugustus
De aquaeductu (On aqueducts) is a two-book official report given to the emperor Nerva or Trajan on the state of the aqueducts of Rome, and was written by Julius Sextus Frontinus at the end of the 1st century AD.
The latter program was headed by the former consul Sextus Julius Frontinus, who helped to put an end to abuses and later published a significant work on Rome's water supply, De Aquis Urbis Romae.

Vitruvius

Marcus Vitruvius PollioVitruvianVitruv
He was well aware of the seminal work De Architectura by Vitruvius, which mentions aqueduct construction and maintenance of the channels, published in the previous century.
Frontinus refers to "Vitruvius the architect" in his late 1st-century work De aquaeductu.

Aqua Claudia

Claudian AqueductaqueductAqueduct of Claudius
He provides the history, sizes and discharge rates of all of the nine aqueducts of Rome at the time at which he was writing at the turn of the 1st century AD: the Aqua Marcia, Aqua Appia, Aqua Alsietina, Aqua Tepula, Anio Vetus, Anio Novus, Aqua Virgo, Aqua Claudia and Aqua Augusta.
It is described in some detail by Frontinus in his work published in the later 1st century, De aquaeductu.

De architectura

Ten Books on ArchitectureOn Architecturebooks of architecture
He was well aware of the seminal work De Architectura by Vitruvius, which mentions aqueduct construction and maintenance of the channels, published in the previous century.
Frontinus wrote De aquaeductu, the definitive treatise on 1st-century Roman aqueducts, and discovered a discrepancy between the intake and supply of water caused by illegal pipes inserted into the channels to divert the water.

Aqua Anio Novus

Anio Novus
He provides the history, sizes and discharge rates of all of the nine aqueducts of Rome at the time at which he was writing at the turn of the 1st century AD: the Aqua Marcia, Aqua Appia, Aqua Alsietina, Aqua Tepula, Anio Vetus, Anio Novus, Aqua Virgo, Aqua Claudia and Aqua Augusta. Silting of the channels was another common problem, especially those aqueducts that drew water directly from rivers, such as Anio Novus, and numerous settling tanks (each one being known as a castellum) were built along their lengths.
It is described in some detail by Frontinus in his work published in the later first century, De aquaeductu.

Ancient Roman architecture

RomanRoman architecturearchitecture
The general Frontinus gives more detail in his official report on the problems, uses and abuses of Imperial Rome's public water supply.

Trajan

Emperor TrajanMarcus Ulpius TraianusTraianus
De aquaeductu (On aqueducts) is a two-book official report given to the emperor Nerva or Trajan on the state of the aqueducts of Rome, and was written by Julius Sextus Frontinus at the end of the 1st century AD.

Monte Cassino

MontecassinoAbbey of MontecassinoAbbey of Monte Cassino
With the recovery of Frontinus' manuscript from the library at Monte Cassino in 1425, effected by the tireless humanist Poggio Bracciolini, details of the construction and maintenance of the Roman aqueduct system became available once more, just as Renaissance Rome began to revive and require a dependable source of pure water.

Aqua Marcia

Acqua Antica MarciaAqua Martia
He provides the history, sizes and discharge rates of all of the nine aqueducts of Rome at the time at which he was writing at the turn of the 1st century AD: the Aqua Marcia, Aqua Appia, Aqua Alsietina, Aqua Tepula, Anio Vetus, Anio Novus, Aqua Virgo, Aqua Claudia and Aqua Augusta.

Aqua Appia

He provides the history, sizes and discharge rates of all of the nine aqueducts of Rome at the time at which he was writing at the turn of the 1st century AD: the Aqua Marcia, Aqua Appia, Aqua Alsietina, Aqua Tepula, Anio Vetus, Anio Novus, Aqua Virgo, Aqua Claudia and Aqua Augusta.

Aqua Alsietina

He provides the history, sizes and discharge rates of all of the nine aqueducts of Rome at the time at which he was writing at the turn of the 1st century AD: the Aqua Marcia, Aqua Appia, Aqua Alsietina, Aqua Tepula, Anio Vetus, Anio Novus, Aqua Virgo, Aqua Claudia and Aqua Augusta.

Aqua Tepula

He provides the history, sizes and discharge rates of all of the nine aqueducts of Rome at the time at which he was writing at the turn of the 1st century AD: the Aqua Marcia, Aqua Appia, Aqua Alsietina, Aqua Tepula, Anio Vetus, Anio Novus, Aqua Virgo, Aqua Claudia and Aqua Augusta.

Aniene

AnioAnio VetusAnio River
He provides the history, sizes and discharge rates of all of the nine aqueducts of Rome at the time at which he was writing at the turn of the 1st century AD: the Aqua Marcia, Aqua Appia, Aqua Alsietina, Aqua Tepula, Anio Vetus, Anio Novus, Aqua Virgo, Aqua Claudia and Aqua Augusta.

Aqua Virgo

He provides the history, sizes and discharge rates of all of the nine aqueducts of Rome at the time at which he was writing at the turn of the 1st century AD: the Aqua Marcia, Aqua Appia, Aqua Alsietina, Aqua Tepula, Anio Vetus, Anio Novus, Aqua Virgo, Aqua Claudia and Aqua Augusta.

Aqua Augusta (Rome)

Aqua AugustaAnother short Augustan aqueduct
He provides the history, sizes and discharge rates of all of the nine aqueducts of Rome at the time at which he was writing at the turn of the 1st century AD: the Aqua Marcia, Aqua Appia, Aqua Alsietina, Aqua Tepula, Anio Vetus, Anio Novus, Aqua Virgo, Aqua Claudia and Aqua Augusta.

Roman lead pipe inscription

inscriptionslead pipe inscriptionLead pipe stamp
Roman lead pipe inscriptions bearing the name of the owner were meant to prevent such water theft.

Water theft

Roman lead pipe inscriptions bearing the name of the owner were meant to prevent such water theft.

Cloaca Maxima

Cloacacloaca maximcloaca-like
Waste water would end up primarily in the main sewers, which led into the Cloaca Maxima and finally the river Tiber.

Tiber

Tiber RiverRiver TiberTevere
Waste water would end up primarily in the main sewers, which led into the Cloaca Maxima and finally the river Tiber.

Roman Campagna

Campagna RomanaCampagnaCampagna di Roma
They were mainly those aqueducts approaching Rome from the east over the plains of the Roman Campagna.

Castellum

castellaRoman fortletfortlet
Silting of the channels was another common problem, especially those aqueducts that drew water directly from rivers, such as Anio Novus, and numerous settling tanks (each one being known as a castellum) were built along their lengths.