Deaf culture

deaf communitydeafdeaf communitiesculturally DeafcultureDeaf Gaindeaf peopleDeaf PrideDeaf identitycommunity of signing deaf people
Deaf culture is the set of social beliefs, behaviors, art, literary traditions, history, values, and shared institutions of communities that are influenced by deafness and which use sign languages as the main means of communication.wikipedia
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Hearing loss

deafdeafnesshearing impairment
Deaf culture is the set of social beliefs, behaviors, art, literary traditions, history, values, and shared institutions of communities that are influenced by deafness and which use sign languages as the main means of communication.
Those who use sign language and are members of Deaf culture see themselves as having a difference rather than an illness.

American Sign Language

ASLsign languageAmerican Sign Language (ASL)
As educator and American Sign Language interpreter Anna Mindess writes, "it is not the extent of hearing loss that defines a member of the deaf community but the individual's own sense of identity and resultant actions." Advocates in deaf education believe that an improved recognition of American Sign Language (ASL) as an official language would improve education, as well as economic status.
American Sign Language (ASL) is a natural language that serves as the predominant sign language of Deaf communities in the United States and most of Anglophone Canada.

Sign language

sign languagesdeaf sign languagesigning
Deaf culture is the set of social beliefs, behaviors, art, literary traditions, history, values, and shared institutions of communities that are influenced by deafness and which use sign languages as the main means of communication.
Wherever communities of deaf people exist, sign languages have developed as handy means of communication and they form the core of local deaf cultures.

Minority group

minorityminoritiesethnic minorities
Deaf people, in the sense of a community or culture, can then be seen as a minority group, and therefore some who are a part of this community may feel misunderstood by those who don't know sign language.
The deaf community is often regarded as a linguistic and cultural minority rather than a group with disabilities, and some deaf people do not see themselves as having a disability at all.

Carl Croneberg

Carl G. Croneberg
Carl G. Croneberg coined the term of "Deaf Culture" and he was the first to discuss analogies between Deaf and hearing cultures in his appendices C/D of the 1965 Dictionary of American Sign Language.
Croneberg coined the term Deaf culture and was the first to discuss the differences between Black ASL and white ASL.

Cochlear implant

cochlear implantsBionic Earcochlea implant
Much of the strongest objection to cochlear implants has come from the Deaf community.

Gallaudet University

Gallaudet CollegeGallaudetColumbia Institution for the Deaf
Referred to often as the "Big Three," these include California State University at Northridge (CSUN), National Technical Institute for the Deaf (part of Rochester Institute of Technology), and Gallaudet University. Deaf culture revolves around such institutions as residential schools for deaf students, universities for deaf students (including Gallaudet University and the National Technical Institute for the Deaf), deaf clubs, deaf athletic leagues, communal homes (such as The Home for Aged and Infirm Deaf-Mutes, founded by Jane Middleton, in New York City), deaf social organizations (such as the Deaf Professional Happy Hour), deaf religious groups, deaf theaters, and an array of conferences and festivals, such as the Deaf Way II Conference and Festival and the World Federation of the Deaf conferences.
Student strikes at Gallaudet University starting March 6, 1988, revolutionized the perception and education of Deaf culture.

Chuck Baird

Charles C. Baird
Deaf artists such as Betty G. Miller and Chuck Baird have produced visual artwork that conveys a Deaf worldview.
Chuck Baird (February 22, 1947 – February 10, 2012) was an American Deaf artist who was one of the more notable founders of the De'VIA art movement, an aesthetic of Deaf Culture in which visual art conveys a Deaf world view.

Laurent Clerc

American Deaf Community recounts the story of Laurent Clerc, a deaf educator, coming to the United States from France in 1817 to help found the first permanent school for deaf children in the country now named American School for the Deaf in Hartford, Connecticut.
Louis Laurent Marie Clerc (26 December 1785 – 18 July 1869) was a French teacher called "The Apostle of the Deaf in America" and was regarded as the most renowned deaf person in American Deaf History.

Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities

CRPDUN Convention on the Rights of Persons with DisabilitiesUNCRPD
Deaf culture is recognized under Article 30, Paragraph 4 of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, which states that "Persons with disabilities shall be entitled, on an equal basis with others, to recognition and support of their specific cultural and linguistic identity, including sign languages and deaf culture."

De'VIA

Some Deaf artists belong to an art movement called De'VIA, which stands for Deaf View Image Art.
Deaf View/Image Art, abbreviated as De’VIA, is a genre of visual art that intentionally represents the Deaf experience and Deaf culture.

Victorian College for the Deaf

In Australia, there is the Victorian College for the Deaf.
Education is provided using a bilingual philosophy of teaching through Auslan, the language of the Australian Deaf community, and English as the second language.

Ben Bahan

Some prominent performers in the United States include Clayton Valli, Ben Bahan, Ella Mae Lentz, Manny Hernandez, C. J. Jones, Debbie Rennie, Patrick Graybill, Peter Cook, and many others.
He is an influential figure in American Sign Language literature as a storyteller and writer of deaf culture.

Rochester Institute of Technology

RITCollege of Imaging Arts and SciencesRochester Athenaeum and Mechanics Institute
Referred to often as the "Big Three," these include California State University at Northridge (CSUN), National Technical Institute for the Deaf (part of Rochester Institute of Technology), and Gallaudet University.
The RIT/NTID Deaf Studies Archive preserves and illustrates the history, art, culture, technology, and language of the Deaf community.

Deaf education

education of the deafschool for the deafdeaf educator
Advocates in deaf education believe that an improved recognition of American Sign Language (ASL) as an official language would improve education, as well as economic status.
Deaf education also includes the study of special education, Deaf studies, education, sign language and Deaf culture (not all programs include the latter two).

British Sign Language

BSLsign languagebfi
Many British television channels broadcast programmes with in-vision signing, using BSL, as well as specially made programmes aimed mainly at deaf people such as the BBC's See Hear and Channel 4's VEE-TV.

National Black Deaf Advocates

The National Black Deaf Advocates was established in 1982 "to promote the leadership development, economic and educational opportunities, social equality, and to safeguard the general health and welfare of Black deaf and hard-of-hearing people."
The story of Black Deaf Advocates goes back to 1980, when the idea was brought up to a small group of locals in Washington, DC, meeting with the board of Deaf Pride.

Signing Exact English

Signed Exact EnglishSEESign Supported English
Some deaf people find SEE to be difficult to efficiently perceive and produce.

National Theatre of the Deaf

National Theater of the DeafNational Theater for the DeafNational Theatre for the Deaf
NTD productions combine American Sign Language with spoken language to fulfill the theatre's mission statement of linking deaf and hearing communities and educating the public about Deaf art.

Sign name

name sign
In Deaf culture and sign language, a sign name (or a name sign) is a special sign that is used to uniquely identify a person, just like a name.

List of Deaf films

This is a list of films that reflect the criteria of the Deaf cinema movement: written, produced or directed by deaf people with leading deaf actors All these works have a tendency to nurture and develop the culture's self image and to reflect correctly the core of the Deaf culture and language.

Audism

Audism can also occur between groups of deaf people, with some who choose not to use a sign language and not to identify with Deaf culture considering themselves to be superior to those who do, or members of the Deaf community asserting superiority over deaf people who use listening and spoken language to communicate.

National Technical Institute for the Deaf

NTIDN.T.I.D.National Technical Institute for the Deaf (NTID)
Deaf culture revolves around such institutions as residential schools for deaf students, universities for deaf students (including Gallaudet University and the National Technical Institute for the Deaf), deaf clubs, deaf athletic leagues, communal homes (such as The Home for Aged and Infirm Deaf-Mutes, founded by Jane Middleton, in New York City), deaf social organizations (such as the Deaf Professional Happy Hour), deaf religious groups, deaf theaters, and an array of conferences and festivals, such as the Deaf Way II Conference and Festival and the World Federation of the Deaf conferences.
The history of NTID and the art, culture, technology, and language of the Deaf community are preserved in the RIT/NTID Deaf Studies Archive, which is housed on campus in the RIT Archive Collections in Wallace Library.

Paddy Ladd

Ladd, P
Dr. Paddy Ladd is a Deaf scholar, author, activist and researcher of Deaf culture.

Second International Congress on Education of the Deaf

Milan Conferenceconference was held in MilanDebate has raged for hundreds of years
Another well-known event is the 1880 Second International Congress on Education of the Deaf in Milan, Italy, where hearing educators voted to embrace oral education and remove sign language from the classroom.