Debris disk

debris disksdisk of dustdust diskdebris discdebrisDebris discsdusty diskring of dustcircumstellar diskcircumstellar dust
A debris disk (American English), or debris disc (Commonwealth English), is a circumstellar disk of dust and debris in orbit around a star.wikipedia
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Fomalhaut

TW Piscis AustriniFomalhaut AAlpha Piscis Austrini
Sometimes these disks contain prominent rings, as seen in the image of Fomalhaut on the right. The first four debris disks discovered with IRAS are known as the "fabulous four": Vega, Beta Pictoris, Fomalhaut, and Epsilon Eridani.
It is classified as a Vega-like star that emits excess infrared radiation, indicating it is surrounded by a circumstellar disk.

Vega

Alpha Lyrae2828Botercadent
In 1984 a debris disk was detected around the star Vega using the IRAS satellite. The first four debris disks discovered with IRAS are known as the "fabulous four": Vega, Beta Pictoris, Fomalhaut, and Epsilon Eridani.
This dust is likely to be the result of collisions between objects in an orbiting debris disk, which is analogous to the Kuiper belt in the Solar System.

Beta Pictoris

β Picβ Pictoristhat more famous system
The first four debris disks discovered with IRAS are known as the "fabulous four": Vega, Beta Pictoris, Fomalhaut, and Epsilon Eridani.
Detailed observations reveal a large disk of dust and gas orbiting the star, which was the first debris disk to be imaged around another star.

Beta Pictoris b

bbeta Pic bβ Pictoris b
That explanation was confirmed with the 2008 discovery of the exoplanet Beta Pictoris b.
Beta Pictoris b (abbreviated as β Pic b) is an exoplanet orbiting the young debris disk A-type main sequence star Beta Pictoris located approximately 63 light-years (19.4 parsecs, or nearly 5.986214 km) away from Earth in the constellation of Pictor.

Epsilon Eridani

ε Eridaniε EriEpsilon Erdani
The first four debris disks discovered with IRAS are known as the "fabulous four": Vega, Beta Pictoris, Fomalhaut, and Epsilon Eridani.
The orbital structure could be maintained by a hypothetical second planet, which if confirmed would be Epsilon Eridani c. Epsilon Eridani hosts an extensive outer debris disk of remnant planetesimals left over from the system's formation.

HR 8799

HR8799three planets
Other exoplanet-hosting stars, including the first discovered by direct imaging (HR 8799), are known to also host debris disks.
It is part of a system that also contains a debris disk and at least four massive planets.

Circumstellar disc

circumstellar diskcircumstellar diskscircumstellar
A debris disk (American English), or debris disc (Commonwealth English), is a circumstellar disk of dust and debris in orbit around a star.

Planetesimal

planetesimalsasteroid impactsplanetessimal
Out of this material are formed planetesimals, which can continue accreting other planetesimals and disk material to form planets.
Planetesimals are solid objects thought to exist in protoplanetary disks and in debris disks.

Exozodiacal dust

This dust is sometimes called exozodiacal dust by analogy to zodiacal dust in the Solar System.
Exozodiacal dust clouds are often components of debris disks that are detected around main-sequence stars through their excess infrared emission.

Protoplanetary disk

protoplanetary discprotoplanetary disksprotoplanetary discs
Younger debris disks can constitute a phase in the formation of a planetary system following the protoplanetary disk phase, when terrestrial planets may finish growing.
These systems are usually referred to as "debris disks".

Tau Ceti

Tau Ceti eτ CetTau Ceti f
Because of its debris disk, any planet orbiting Tau Ceti would face far more impact events than Earth.

IRAS

Infrared Astronomical SatelliteInfrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS)Infrared Astronomy Satellite
In 1984 a debris disk was detected around the star Vega using the IRAS satellite.
In 2014, using new image processing techniques on the Hubble data, researchers discovered planetary disks around these stars.

AU Microscopii

AU Mic
Like β Pictoris, AU Microscopii has a circumstellar disk of dust known as a debris disk.

HD 69830

285 G. Pup
In 2005, the Spitzer Space Telescope discovered a narrow ring of warm debris orbiting the star.

Eta Corvi

η Crvη Corvi
Two debris disks have been detected orbiting this star, one at ~150 AU, and a warmer one within a few astronomical units (AU).

Kuiper belt

Kuiper belt objectKuiper belt objectsKuiper cliff
Most known debris disks have radii of 10–100 astronomical units (AU); they resemble the Kuiper belt in the Solar System, but with much more dust.
Most known debris discs around other stars are fairly young, but the two images on the right, taken by the Hubble Space Telescope in January 2006, are old enough (roughly 300 million years) to have settled into stable configurations.

HD 207129

A debris disk has been imaged around this star in visible light using the ACS instrument on the Hubble Space Telescope; it has also been imaged in the infrared (70 μm) using the MIPS instrument on the Spitzer Space Telescope.

HD 98800

HD 98800B
In 2007, a debris disk was discovered orbiting HD 98800 B consisting of two rings which indicates there may be an extrasolar planet orbiting within a distance of 1.5 to 2 astronomical units.

HD 139664

g Lupg Lupi
A debris disk has been imaged around this star using the coronagraphic mode of the ACS instrument on the Hubble Space Telescope.

HD 92945

A debris disk has been observed around the star by coronagraphic imaging, using the ACS and NICMOS instruments on the Hubble Space Telescope.

Zeta Leporis

ζ Lepζ Leporis
This debris disk is constrained to a diameter of 12.2 AU.

HD 107146

In 2003, astronomers recognized the excess infrared and submillimeter emission indicative of circumstellar dust, the first time such a debris disk phenomenon was noted around a star of similar spectral types to the Sun, though having a much younger age.

HD 12039

This debris disk may have been created by the breakup of a single, 100 km diameter planetesimal through a collision.

51 Ophiuchi

51 Ophc Oph
51 Ophiuchi has a disk of dust and gas that appears to be a young debris disk and is probably a planetary system in the late stages of formation.

HD 53143

Based upon an excess of infrared emission, a circumstellar debris disk has been found in this sysyem.