Decimal Day

decimalisationdecimalizationdecimal currencydecimaliseddecimalDecimalisation of UK currency1971 decimalization19s 6das the UKBritain adopting decimal currency
Decimal Day in the United Kingdom and in Ireland was on 15 February 1971, the day on which each country decimalised its respective £sd currency of pounds, shillings, and pence.wikipedia
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Shilling (British coin)

shillingsshillings
Decimal Day in the United Kingdom and in Ireland was on 15 February 1971, the day on which each country decimalised its respective £sd currency of pounds, shillings, and pence.
Following decimalisation on 15 February 1971 the coin had a value of five new pence.

Pound sterling

£GBPpounds
Decimal Day in the United Kingdom and in Ireland was on 15 February 1971, the day on which each country decimalised its respective £sd currency of pounds, shillings, and pence.
Since decimalisation on Decimal Day in 1971, the pound has been divided into 100 pence (denoted on coinage, until 1981, as "new pence").

£sd

£shillings and pence per poundd
Decimal Day in the United Kingdom and in Ireland was on 15 February 1971, the day on which each country decimalised its respective £sd currency of pounds, shillings, and pence.
The UK abandoned the old penny on Decimal Day, 15 February 1971, when one pound sterling became divided into 100 new pence.

Penny

pencedpennies
Decimal Day in the United Kingdom and in Ireland was on 15 February 1971, the day on which each country decimalised its respective £sd currency of pounds, shillings, and pence.
Following decimalization, the British and Irish coins were marked "new penny" until 1982 and 1985, respectively.

Decimalisation

decimal currencydecimaliseddecimalization
Decimal Day in the United Kingdom and in Ireland was on 15 February 1971, the day on which each country decimalised its respective £sd currency of pounds, shillings, and pence.
(See £sd and Decimal Day.)

Threepence (British coin)

threepence3dthreepenny
This would have changed the threepence into 2 1⁄2 new pence, the sixpence into fivepence and the half crown into a two shilling, five pence piece. Within two weeks of Decimal Day, the old penny (1d) and old threepenny (3d) coins had left circulation, and old sixpences were becoming rare.
Before Decimal Day in 1971 there were two hundred and forty pence in one pound sterling.

Irish pound

IR££IEP
In Ireland, the Irish pound had a similar £sd currency structure and similar changes took place.
The changeover occurred on Decimal Day, 15 February 1971.

Mill (currency)

millmillsmil
The Royal Commission on Decimal Coinage (1918–1920), chaired by Lord Emmott, reported in 1920 that the only feasible scheme was to divide the pound into 1,000 mills (the pound and mill system, first proposed in 1824) but that this would be too inconvenient.
In the United Kingdom it was proposed during the decades of discussion on the decimalisation of the pound as a 1⁄1000 division of the pound sterling.

Half crown (British coin)

half a crownhalf crownhalf-crown
This would have changed the threepence into 2 1⁄2 new pence, the sixpence into fivepence and the half crown into a two shilling, five pence piece. The old halfpenny was withdrawn from circulation on 31 July 1969, and the half-crown (2s 6d) followed on 31 December to ease the transition.
The half crown was demonetised (ahead of other pre-decimal coins) on 1 January 1970, the year before the United Kingdom adopted decimal currency on Decimal Day.

Double florin

A double florin or four-shilling piece was a further step in that direction, but failed to gain acceptance, and was struck only from 1887 to 1890. All pre-decimal coins (except for certain non-circulating coins such as crowns, sovereigns, and double florins which were explicitly excluded from demonetisation) are now no longer legal tender.
As with the sixpence, Shilling, and Florin the coin was not demonetized as part of the 1971 decimalization.

Ten pence (British coin)

ten pence10pBritish ten pence coin
The 5p and 10p coins were introduced in April 1968 and were the same size, composition, and value as the shilling and two shillings coins in circulation with them.
Its obverse has featured the profile of Queen Elizabeth II since the coin's introduction in 1968, to replace the florin coin in preparation for decimalisation in 1971.

Five pence (British coin)

five pence5p18mm coin
The 5p and 10p coins were introduced in April 1968 and were the same size, composition, and value as the shilling and two shillings coins in circulation with them.
Its obverse has featured the profile of Queen Elizabeth II since the coin’s introduction on 23 April 1968, replacing the shilling in preparation for decimalisation in 1971.

Alfred Emmott, 1st Baron Emmott

Alfred EmmottThe Lord EmmottBaron Emmott
The Royal Commission on Decimal Coinage (1918–1920), chaired by Lord Emmott, reported in 1920 that the only feasible scheme was to divide the pound into 1,000 mills (the pound and mill system, first proposed in 1824) but that this would be too inconvenient.
Emmott was also Director of the War Trade Department between 1915 and 1919, chaired the Royal Commission on Decimal Coinage between 1918 and 1920 and was President of the Royal Statistical Society between 1922 and 1924.

Shilling

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The 5p and 10p coins were introduced in April 1968 and were the same size, composition, and value as the shilling and two shillings coins in circulation with them.
The common currency created in 1707 by Article 16 of the Articles of Union continued in use until decimalisation in 1971.

Halfpenny (British pre-decimal coin)

halfpennyha'pennyhalfpennies
The old halfpenny was withdrawn from circulation on 31 July 1969, and the half-crown (2s 6d) followed on 31 December to ease the transition.
In the run-up to decimalisation it ceased to be legal tender from 31 July 1969.

Halfpenny (British decimal coin)

halfpennyhalf pennyBritish coin of the same denomination
Criticisms included the small size of the new halfpenny coin and the fact that some traders had taken advantage of the transition to raise prices (overall price adjustments slightly favoured the consumer). The new halfpenny, penny, and twopence coins were introduced on 15 February 1971.
The British decimal halfpenny (1⁄2p) coin was introduced in February 1971, at the time of decimalisation, and was worth one two-hundredth of a pound sterling.

Penny (British decimal coin)

penceppenny
The new halfpenny, penny, and twopence coins were introduced on 15 February 1971.
Its obverse has featured the profile of Queen Elizabeth II since the coin's introduction on 15 February 1971, the day British currency was decimalised.

Penny (British pre-decimal coin)

dpennypence
Within two weeks of Decimal Day, the old penny (1d) and old threepenny (3d) coins had left circulation, and old sixpences were becoming rare.
Before Decimal Day in 1971 twelve pence made a shilling, and twenty shillings made a pound, hence 240 pence in one pound.

Sixpence (British coin)

sixpence6dsixpences
This would have changed the threepence into 2 1⁄2 new pence, the sixpence into fivepence and the half crown into a two shilling, five pence piece. Within two weeks of Decimal Day, the old penny (1d) and old threepenny (3d) coins had left circulation, and old sixpences were becoming rare.
Following decimalisation in 1971 it had a value of 2 1⁄2 new pence.

Florin (British coin)

florintwo bobtwo shillings
The 5p and 10p coins were introduced in April 1968 and were the same size, composition, and value as the shilling and two shillings coins in circulation with them. After this defeat, little practical progress towards decimalisation was made for over a century, with the exception of the two-shilling silver florin (worth 1⁄10 of a pound) first issued in 1849.
Valued at one tenth of a pound (24 old pence), it was the last coin circulating immediately prior to decimalisation to be demonetised, in 1993, having for a quarter of a century circulated alongside the ten pence piece, identical in specifications and value.

Two pence (British decimal coin)

two pence2ptuppence
The new halfpenny, penny, and twopence coins were introduced on 15 February 1971.
Its obverse has featured the profile of Queen Elizabeth II since the coin's introduction on 15 February 1971, the year British currency was decimalised.

Crown (British coin)

crowncrownscrown coin
All pre-decimal coins (except for certain non-circulating coins such as crowns, sovereigns, and double florins which were explicitly excluded from demonetisation) are now no longer legal tender.
In that format it has continued to be minted, even following decimalisation of the British currency in 1971.

Guinea (coin)

guineasguineagns
Amounts denominated in guineas (21s or £1.05) are reserved for specialist transactions, such as the sale of horses and some auctions.
In each case a guinea meant an amount of one pound and one shilling (21 shillings), or one pound and five pence (£1.05) in decimalised currency.

History of the halfpenny

halfpennyhalfpennies
A further three members recommended that the pound should be replaced by the Royal, consisting of 100 halfpennies (i.e. there would be 4.8 Royals to the former pound).
The new two pence coin, introduced when decimalisation of British coinage took effect in 1971, is essentially the same size as the halfpenny coin as it had most recently existed.

Bill Fiske, Baron Fiske

Bill FiskeWilliam Geoffrey FiskeLord Fiske
Former Greater London Council leader Bill Fiske was named as the Chairman of the Decimal Currency Board.
The date for the switch, which became known as 'Decimal Day' or 'D day', was set for Monday 15 February 1971 but the new decimal coins (some of which were the same value as existing pre-decimal coinage) were introduced gradually.