Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples

United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous PeoplesUN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous PeoplesUnited Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous PeopleDeclaration of the Rights of Indigenous PeoplesUNDRIPa United Nations resolution calling for the self-determination of peoplesindigenous peoples human rightsindigenous rightsrights of indigenous peoplesUN on the Rights of Indigenous People
The United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP or DOTROIP ) delineates and defines the individual and collective rights of Indigenous peoples, including their ownership rights to cultural and ceremonial expression, identity, language, employment, health, education and other issues.wikipedia
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Indigenous peoples

indigenousindigenous peopleaboriginal
According to a UN press release it does "represent the dynamic development of international legal norms and it reflects the commitment of the UN's member states to move in certain directions"; the UN describes it as setting "an important standard for the treatment of indigenous peoples that will undoubtedly be a significant tool toward eliminating human rights violations against the planet's 370 million indigenous people, and assisting them in combating discrimination and marginalisation."
The United Nations has issued a Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP) to guide member-state national policies to the collective rights of indigenous peoples, such as culture, identity, language and access to employment, health, education and natural resources.

Indigenous and Tribal Peoples Convention, 1989

ILO Convention 169Convention 169Indigenous and Tribal Peoples Convention
During this the International Labour Organization adopted the Indigenous and Tribal Peoples Convention, 1989.
It is the major binding international convention concerning indigenous peoples and tribal peoples, and a forerunner of the Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.

Indigenous rights

Aboriginal rightsrights of indigenous peoplesrights
The United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP or DOTROIP ) delineates and defines the individual and collective rights of Indigenous peoples, including their ownership rights to cultural and ceremonial expression, identity, language, employment, health, education and other issues.
In September 2007, after a process of preparations, discussions and negotiations stretching back to 1982, the General Assembly adopted the Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.

Vienna Declaration and Programme of Action

Vienna Declaration
The Declaration went through numerous drafts from 1994-2006, and a version had already been recommended by the Vienna Declaration and Programme of Action in 1993.
In Part II, para 29, the VDPA recommends that the Commission on Human Rights consider the renewal and updating of the mandate of the Working Group on Indigenous Populations upon complement of the drafting of the Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.

Ken Coates (historian)

Ken CoatesCoates, Ken
Canada Research Chair and faculty member at the University of Saskatchewan Ken Coates argues that UNDRIP resonates powerfully with Indigenous peoples, while national governments have not yet fully understood its impact.
Coates, in a 2013 series co-authored with Terry Mitchell, entitled The Rise of the Fourth World, argued that the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, adopted by the United Nations General Assembly in 2007 and endorsed by Canada in 2010, resonates powerfully with Indigenous peoples, while national governments have not yet fully understood its impact.

Working Group on Indigenous Populations

United Nations Working Group on Indigenous PeoplesUnited Nations Working Group on Indigenous PopulationsWorking Group on Indigenous Peoples
The idea originated in 1982 when the UN Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC) set up its Working Group on Indigenous Populations (WGIP), established as a result of a study by Special Rapporteur José Ricardo Martínez Cobo on the problem of discrimination faced by indigenous peoples.

Evo Morales

Evo Morales AymaMoralesJuan Evo Morales Ayma
Evo Morales, President of Bolivia, stated, "We are the first country to turn this declaration into a law and that is important, brothers and sisters. We recognize and salute the work of our representatives. But if we were to remember the indigenous fight clearly, many of us who are sensitive would end up crying in remembering the discrimination, the scorn."
The plan brought condemnation from environmentalists and indigenous communities living in the TIPNIS, who claimed that it would encourage deforestation and illegal settlement and that it violated the constitution and United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.

Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies

Australian Institute of Aboriginal StudiesAIATSISAustralian Institute for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies
The Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies formally acknowledges and upholds the principles of the Declaration in both their Collection Access and Use Policy and their Guidelines for Ethical Research in Australian Indigenous Studies.
AIATSIS also acknowledges the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples and in particular Article 31's recognition of the right of Indigenous people to "maintain, control, protect and develop their cultural heritage, traditional knowledge and traditional cultural expressions."

Jody Wilson-Raybould

Wilson-Raybould1
In July 2016, Kwakwaka’wakw Justice Minister Jody Wilson-Raybould gave a speech that stated that "adopting the UNDRIP as being Canadian law are unworkable", due to its incompatibility with the Indian Act, the current governing statute.
As Regional Chief, Wilson-Raybould concentrated on the need for nation building, good governance, and empowering indigenous peoples to take the practical steps necessary to implement the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples and to realize the promise of the recognition of aboriginal and treaty rights in section 35 of the Constitution Act, 1982.

Survival International

Stephen Corry, director of the international indigenous rights organization Survival International, said, "The declaration has been debated for nearly a quarter century. Years which have seen many tribal peoples, such as the Akuntsu and Kanoê in Brazil, decimated and others, such as the Innu in Canada, brought to the edge. Governments that oppose it are shamefully fighting against the human rights of their most vulnerable peoples. Claims they make to support human rights in other areas will be seen as hypocritical."

Scott Fraser (politician)

Scott FraserFraserScott Kenneth Fraser
The legislation was originally put forth by Minister of Indigenous Relations and Reconciliation Scott Fraser (politician), under John Horgan’s New Democratic Party government.
On aboriginal issues, Fraser supported Premier Campbell's declaration that aboriginal peoples constitute a nation, and encouraged the Premier to recognize the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.

United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues

UN Permanent Forum on Indigenous IssuesPermanent Forum on Indigenous IssuesInternational Decade of the World's Indigenous Peoples
Speaking at the UN Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues, Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada minister Carolyn Bennett announced, "We are now a full supporter of the declaration, without qualification. We intend nothing less than to adopt and implement the declaration in accordance with the Canadian Constitution."

National Indigenous Peoples Day

National Aboriginal Day
The federal government pledged on 21 June 2017 to rename its National Aboriginal Day to be consistent with the terminology used by the Declaration.
Assembly of First Nations National Chief Perry Bellegarde supported the proposed change, called it an "important step," citing the terminology used in the landmark United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples."

Multiculturalism

multiculturaldiversitycosmopolitan
The goal of the Declaration is to encourage countries to work alongside indigenous peoples to solve global issues, like development, multicultural democracy and decentralization.
The United Nations General Assembly (UNGA) adopted the United Nations' Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP) in 2007.

Decentralization

decentralizeddecentralisationdecentralised
The goal of the Declaration is to encourage countries to work alongside indigenous peoples to solve global issues, like development, multicultural democracy and decentralization.

International law

public international lawinternationallaw of nations
As a General Assembly Declaration, UNDRIP is not a legally binding instrument under international law.

Human rights

human righthuman rights violationshuman rights abuses
According to a UN press release it does "represent the dynamic development of international legal norms and it reflects the commitment of the UN's member states to move in certain directions"; the UN describes it as setting "an important standard for the treatment of indigenous peoples that will undoubtedly be a significant tool toward eliminating human rights violations against the planet's 370 million indigenous people, and assisting them in combating discrimination and marginalisation."

Discrimination

discriminatoryanti-discriminationdiscriminate
According to a UN press release it does "represent the dynamic development of international legal norms and it reflects the commitment of the UN's member states to move in certain directions"; the UN describes it as setting "an important standard for the treatment of indigenous peoples that will undoubtedly be a significant tool toward eliminating human rights violations against the planet's 370 million indigenous people, and assisting them in combating discrimination and marginalisation."

Social exclusion

marginalizedmarginalizationsocial inclusion
According to a UN press release it does "represent the dynamic development of international legal norms and it reflects the commitment of the UN's member states to move in certain directions"; the UN describes it as setting "an important standard for the treatment of indigenous peoples that will undoubtedly be a significant tool toward eliminating human rights violations against the planet's 370 million indigenous people, and assisting them in combating discrimination and marginalisation."

University of Saskatchewan

SaskatchewanSt. Andrew's CollegeRegina
Canada Research Chair and faculty member at the University of Saskatchewan Ken Coates argues that UNDRIP resonates powerfully with Indigenous peoples, while national governments have not yet fully understood its impact.

Iroquois

Iroquois ConfederacyHaudenosauneeSix Nations
The groundwork toward this declaration began in 1923 and 1925 with the works of Haudenosaunee Chief Deskaheh and Māori T.W. Ratana, who attempted to bring issues of Canada and New Zealand's failure to uphold treaties to the League of Nations, United Nations' precursor.

Deskaheh

Levi General
The groundwork toward this declaration began in 1923 and 1925 with the works of Haudenosaunee Chief Deskaheh and Māori T.W. Ratana, who attempted to bring issues of Canada and New Zealand's failure to uphold treaties to the League of Nations, United Nations' precursor.

Māori people

MāoriMaoriNew Zealand Māori
The groundwork toward this declaration began in 1923 and 1925 with the works of Haudenosaunee Chief Deskaheh and Māori T.W. Ratana, who attempted to bring issues of Canada and New Zealand's failure to uphold treaties to the League of Nations, United Nations' precursor.

T. W. Ratana

Tahupotiki Wiremu RatanaTahupōtiki Wiremu RātanaTahupotiki Wiremu Rātana
The groundwork toward this declaration began in 1923 and 1925 with the works of Haudenosaunee Chief Deskaheh and Māori T.W. Ratana, who attempted to bring issues of Canada and New Zealand's failure to uphold treaties to the League of Nations, United Nations' precursor.

League of Nations

The League of NationsCouncil of the League of NationsLeague
The groundwork toward this declaration began in 1923 and 1925 with the works of Haudenosaunee Chief Deskaheh and Māori T.W. Ratana, who attempted to bring issues of Canada and New Zealand's failure to uphold treaties to the League of Nations, United Nations' precursor.