Deinterlacing

deinterlacedeinterlacedDe-interlacingAdaptive De-Interlacingconvertde-interlacede-interlacesdeinterlacerdeinterlacersdeninterlacing
Deinterlacing is the process of converting interlaced video into a non-interlaced or progressive form.wikipedia
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Interlaced video

interlacedinterlaceinterlacing
Deinterlacing is the process of converting interlaced video into a non-interlaced or progressive form. An interlaced video frame consists of two fields taken in sequence: the first containing all the odd lines of the image, and the second all the even lines.
To display interlaced video on progressive scan displays, playback applies deinterlacing to the video signal (which adds input lag).

Video

analog videovideo albumvideo recording
Both video and photographic film capture a series of frames (still images) in rapid succession; however, television systems read the captured image by serially scanning the image sensor by lines (rows).
A procedure known as deinterlacing can optimize the display of an interlaced video signal from an analog, DVD or satellite source on a progressive scan device such as an LCD television, digital video projector or plasma panel.

Field (video)

fieldfieldsvideo field
An interlaced video frame consists of two fields taken in sequence: the first containing all the odd lines of the image, and the second all the even lines.
Converting fields to a still frame image requires a process called deinterlacing, in which the missing lines are duplicated or interpolated to recreate the information that would have been contained in the discarded field.

Progressive scan

progressiveprogressive videoprogressive-scan
Deinterlacing is the process of converting interlaced video into a non-interlaced or progressive form.
For an in-depth explanation of the fundamentals and advantages/disadvantages of converting interlaced video to a progressive format, see deinterlacing.

Line doubler

line doublingde-interlacingdisplaying each line of pixels twice
* Line doubling or "bobbing" takes the lines of each interlaced field (consisting of only even or odd lines) and doubles them, filling the entire frame.
A line doubler is a device used to deinterlace video signals prior to display.

Telecine

3:2 pulldowninverse telecinejudder
Converting film to interlaced video typically uses a process called telecine whereby each frame is converted to multiple fields.
Algorithms that perform 2:3 pulldown removal also usually perform the task of deinterlacing.

1080p

Full HDFHD1080p30
The European Broadcasting Union has argued against the use of interlaced video in production and broadcasting, recommending 720p 50 fps (frames per second) as current production format and working with the industry to introduce 1080p50 as a future-proof production standard which offers higher vertical resolution, better quality at lower bitrates, and easier conversion to other formats such as 720p50 and 1080i50.
EBU has been endorsing 1080p50 as a future-proof production format because it improves resolution and requires no deinterlacing, allows broadcasting of standard 1080i25 and 720p50 signal alongside 1080p50 even in the current infrastructure and is compatible with DCI distribution formats.

Faroudja

DCDiDCDi by FaroudjaFaroudja Labs
Yves Faroudja, the founder of Faroudja Labs and Emmy Award winner for his achievements in deinterlacing technology, has stated that "interlace to progressive does not work" and advised against using interlaced signal.
Its technologies for deinterlacing and inverse telecine have received great acclaim within the consumer electronics industry and have been widely used in many electronic devices, such as TV sets, set top boxes and video processors.

Video scaler

upscaledupscalingStretch-o-Vision
Deinterlacing is only partly responsible for such lag; scaling also involves complex algorithms that take milliseconds to run.

Filter (video)

video filtersvideo filterfilter
However, it can be successfully used to apply video filters which expect a noninterlaced frame, such as those exploiting information from neighbouring pixels (e.g., sharpening).

Analog television

analoganalogueanalogue television
Interlaced video signals are commonly found in analog television, digital television (HDTV) when in the 1080i format, some DVD titles, and a smaller number of Blu-ray discs.

High-definition television

HDTVhigh definitionHD
Interlaced video signals are commonly found in analog television, digital television (HDTV) when in the 1080i format, some DVD titles, and a smaller number of Blu-ray discs.

1080i

1080i501080i601080i25
Interlaced video signals are commonly found in analog television, digital television (HDTV) when in the 1080i format, some DVD titles, and a smaller number of Blu-ray discs.

DVD

DVD-ROMDVDsDVD-9
Interlaced video signals are commonly found in analog television, digital television (HDTV) when in the 1080i format, some DVD titles, and a smaller number of Blu-ray discs.

Frame rate

frames per secondfpsframe/s
The European Broadcasting Union has argued against the use of interlaced video in production and broadcasting, recommending 720p 50 fps (frames per second) as current production format and working with the industry to introduce 1080p50 as a future-proof production standard which offers higher vertical resolution, better quality at lower bitrates, and easier conversion to other formats such as 720p50 and 1080i50. Analog television employed this technique because it allowed for less transmission bandwidth while keeping a high frame rate for smoother and more life-like motion.

Film

motion picturemoviefilms
Both video and photographic film capture a series of frames (still images) in rapid succession; however, television systems read the captured image by serially scanning the image sensor by lines (rows).

Film frame

frameframesvideo frame
Both video and photographic film capture a series of frames (still images) in rapid succession; however, television systems read the captured image by serially scanning the image sensor by lines (rows).

Image sensor

image sensorssensorsensors
Both video and photographic film capture a series of frames (still images) in rapid succession; however, television systems read the captured image by serially scanning the image sensor by lines (rows).

PAL

colour television25pPAL-N
For instance, PAL and SECAM systems have a rate of 25 frames/sec or 50 fields/sec, while the NTSC system delivers 29.97 frames/sec or 59.94 fields/sec.

SECAM

SÉCAMCIS-SECAMSECAM L
For instance, PAL and SECAM systems have a rate of 25 frames/sec or 50 fields/sec, while the NTSC system delivers 29.97 frames/sec or 59.94 fields/sec.

NTSC

analogNTSC-M30p
For instance, PAL and SECAM systems have a rate of 25 frames/sec or 50 fields/sec, while the NTSC system delivers 29.97 frames/sec or 59.94 fields/sec.

Flicker (screen)

flickerflickeringscreen flicker
Since the interlaced signal contains the two fields of a video frame shot at two different times, it enhances motion perception to the viewer and reduces flicker by taking advantage of the persistence of vision effect.

Persistence of vision

flickeringmerge the separate picturesmoving image
Since the interlaced signal contains the two fields of a video frame shot at two different times, it enhances motion perception to the viewer and reduces flicker by taking advantage of the persistence of vision effect.

Cathode-ray tube

cathode ray tubeCRTcathode ray tubes
However, interlaced signal requires a display that is natively capable of showing the individual fields in a sequential order, and only traditional CRT-based TV sets are capable of displaying interlaced signal, due to the electronic scanning and lack of apparent fixed resolution.