Deity

deitiesgodsgodGodheaddivine beingpagan godθεόςhigher powergod or godsgoddess
A deity or god is a supernatural being considered divine or sacred.wikipedia
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Supernatural

supernaturalismsupernatural powersspiritual
A deity or god is a supernatural being considered divine or sacred.
Examples include immaterial beings such as angels, gods and spirits, and claimed human abilities like magic, telekinesis, precognition and extrasensory perception.

Sacred

holyholinesssanctity
A deity or god is a supernatural being considered divine or sacred.
Something that is sacred is dedicated or set apart for the service or worship of a deity or considered worthy of spiritual respect or devotion; or inspiring awe or reverence among believers.

Divinity

divinegodhooddivinities
A deity or god is a supernatural being considered divine or sacred. This root yields the ancient Indian word Deva meaning "to gleam, a shining one", from *div- "to shine", as well as Greek dios "divine" and Zeus; and Latin deus "god" (Old Latin deivos).
In religion, divinity or Godhead is the state of things that are believed to come from a supernatural power or deity, such as God, the supreme being, creator deity, or spirits, and are therefore regarded as sacred and holy.

Goddess

goddessessacred femininefemale deity
In the English language, a male deity is referred to as a god, while a female deity is referred to as a goddess.
A goddess is a female deity.

Monotheism

monotheisticmonotheistmonotheists
Monotheistic religions accept only one deity (predominantly referred to as God), polytheistic religions accept multiple deities.
A narrower definition of monotheism is the belief in the existence of only one god that created the world, is all-powerful and intervenes in the world.

God (male deity)

goddeitygods
In the English language, a male deity is referred to as a god, while a female deity is referred to as a goddess.
A god is a male deity, in contrast with a goddess, a female deity.

Polytheism

polytheisticpolytheistspolytheist
Monotheistic religions accept only one deity (predominantly referred to as God), polytheistic religions accept multiple deities.
Polytheism (from Greek πολυθεϊσμός, polytheismos) is the worship of or belief in multiple deities, which are usually assembled into a pantheon of gods and goddesses, along with their own religions and rituals.

Religion

religiousreligionsreligious beliefs
Monotheistic religions accept only one deity (predominantly referred to as God), polytheistic religions accept multiple deities.
Religious practices may include rituals, sermons, commemoration or veneration (of deities), sacrifices, festivals, feasts, trances, initiations, funerary services, matrimonial services, meditation, prayer, music, art, dance, public service, or other aspects of human culture.

Creator deity

Creatorcreator godthe Creator
Henotheistic religions accept one supreme deity without denying other deities, considering them as aspects of the same divine principle; and nontheistic religions deny any supreme eternal creator deity but accept a pantheon of deities which live, die and may be reborn like any other being.
A creator deity or creator god (often called the Creator) is a deity or god responsible for the creation of the Earth, world, and universe in human religion and mythology.

Henotheism

henotheistichenotheistshenotheistically
Henotheistic religions accept one supreme deity without denying other deities, considering them as aspects of the same divine principle; and nontheistic religions deny any supreme eternal creator deity but accept a pantheon of deities which live, die and may be reborn like any other being.
Henotheism is the worship of a single god while not denying the existence or possible existence of other deities.

Pantheon (religion)

pantheonpantheonsgods
Henotheistic religions accept one supreme deity without denying other deities, considering them as aspects of the same divine principle; and nontheistic religions deny any supreme eternal creator deity but accept a pantheon of deities which live, die and may be reborn like any other being.
A pantheon (from Greek πάνθεον pantheon, literally "(a temple) of all gods", "of or common to all gods" from πᾶν pan- "all" and θεός theos "god") is the particular set of all gods of any polytheistic religion, mythology, or tradition.

Omnipresence

omnipresentubiquitousubiquitously
Although most monotheistic religions traditionally envision their God as omnipotent, omnipresent, omniscient, omnibenevolent, and eternal, none of these qualities are essential to the definition of a "deity" and various cultures conceptualized their deities differently.
The term omnipresence is most often used in a religious context as an attribute of a deity or supreme being, while the term ubiquity is generally used to describe something "existing or being everywhere at the same time, constantly encountered, widespread, common."

Omnipotence

omnipotentall-powerfulalmighty
Although most monotheistic religions traditionally envision their God as omnipotent, omnipresent, omniscient, omnibenevolent, and eternal, none of these qualities are essential to the definition of a "deity" and various cultures conceptualized their deities differently.
Monotheistic religions generally attribute omnipotence to only the deity of their faith.

Tutelary deity

tutelary deitiespatron deitytutelary
Deities were envisioned as a form of existence (Saṃsāra) after rebirth, for human beings who gain merit through an ethical life, where they become guardian deities and live blissfully in heaven, but are also subject to death when their merit is lost.
A tutelary ( or ) (also tutelar) is a deity or spirit who is a guardian, patron, or protector of a particular place, geographic feature, person, lineage, nation, culture, or occupation.

Heaven

celestialParadiseheavenly kingdom
Deities were envisioned as a form of existence (Saṃsāra) after rebirth, for human beings who gain merit through an ethical life, where they become guardian deities and live blissfully in heaven, but are also subject to death when their merit is lost.
Heaven, or the heavens, is a common religious, cosmological, or transcendent place where beings such as gods, angels, spirits, saints, or venerated ancestors are said to originate, be enthroned, or live.

God

Supreme BeingLordnature of God
Monotheistic religions accept only one deity (predominantly referred to as God), polytheistic religions accept multiple deities. Henotheistic religions accept one supreme deity without denying other deities, considering them as aspects of the same divine principle; and nontheistic religions deny any supreme eternal creator deity but accept a pantheon of deities which live, die and may be reborn like any other being. Although most monotheistic religions traditionally envision their God as omnipotent, omnipresent, omniscient, omnibenevolent, and eternal, none of these qualities are essential to the definition of a "deity" and various cultures conceptualized their deities differently. In most polytheistic religions, the different gods and goddesses are representations of forces of nature or ancestral principles, and can be viewed either as autonomous or as aspects or emanations of a creator God or transcendental absolute principle (monistic theologies), which manifests immanently in nature.
In the ancient Egyptian era of Atenism, possibly the earliest recorded monotheistic religion, this deity was called Aten, premised on being the one "true" Supreme Being and creator of the universe.

Ancient Greece

Greekancient Greekancient Greeks
Historically, many ancient cultures – including the ancient Mesopotamians, Egyptians, Greeks, Romans, and Norsemen– personified natural phenomena, variously as either deliberate causes or effects.
Science and religion were not separate and getting closer to the truth meant getting closer to the gods.

Deva (Hinduism)

DevasDevagods
This root yields the ancient Indian word Deva meaning "to gleam, a shining one", from *div- "to shine", as well as Greek dios "divine" and Zeus; and Latin deus "god" (Old Latin deivos).
Deva (Sanskrit: देव, ) means "heavenly, divine, anything of excellence", and is also one of the terms for a deity in Hinduism.

Deus

DeoDii
The English language word "deity" derives from Old French deité, the Latin deitatem or "divine nature", coined by Augustine of Hippo from deus ("god").
Deus is the Latin word for "god" or "deity".

Devi

Hindu goddessgoddessDevī
Deva is masculine, and the related feminine equivalent is devi.
Devi – the feminine form, and Deva – the masculine form, mean "heavenly, divine, anything of excellence", and are also gender specific terms for a deity in Hinduism.

Libation

libationsdrinkoffer it to the gods
An alternate etymology for the term "god" comes from the Proto-Germanic Gaut, which traces it to the PIE root *ghu-to- ("poured"), derived from the root *gheu- ("to pour, pour a libation").
A libation is a ritual pouring of a liquid, or grains such as rice, as an offering to a deity or spirit, or in memory of the dead.

Gender of God

God and gendergender of God and deitiesgender of the monotheistic God
The gender of the monotheistic God shifted to masculine under the influence of Christianity.
The gender of God can be viewed as a literal or as an allegorical aspect of a deity.

Transcendence (religion)

transcendenttranscendencetranscendental
In most polytheistic religions, the different gods and goddesses are representations of forces of nature or ancestral principles, and can be viewed either as autonomous or as aspects or emanations of a creator God or transcendental absolute principle (monistic theologies), which manifests immanently in nature.
In religion, transcendence is the aspect of a deity's nature and power that is wholly independent of the material universe, beyond all known physical laws.

Theism

theistictheisttheists
Theism is the belief in the existence of one or more deities.
Theism is broadly defined as the belief in the existence of the Supreme Being or deities.

Proto-Indo-European mythology

Proto-Indo-European religionIndo-EuropeanProto-Indo-European
In contrast, all ancient Indo-European cultures and mythologies recognized both masculine and feminine deities.
Nonetheless, scholars of comparative mythology have attempted to reconstruct aspects of Proto-Indo-European mythology based on the existence of similarities among the deities, religious practices, and myths of various Indo-European peoples.