Delhi Sultanate

Sultanate of DelhiSultan of DelhiDelhiDelhi SultanSultans of DelhiDelhi SultansSultanateSultan of the Delhi SultanateIslamic SultanateSultanate India
The Delhi Sultanate (, undefined) was an Islamic empire based in Delhi that stretched over large parts of the Indian subcontinent for 320 years (1206–1526).wikipedia
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Delhi

Delhi, IndiaNational Capital Territory of DelhiNational Capital Territory
The Delhi Sultanate (, undefined) was an Islamic empire based in Delhi that stretched over large parts of the Indian subcontinent for 320 years (1206–1526).
Under the Delhi Sultanate, it was an Imperial city.

Sayyid dynasty

SayyidSultanate of DelhiDelhi Sultanate of South Asia
Five dynasties ruled over the Delhi Sultanate sequentially: the Mamluk dynasty (1206–90), the Khalji dynasty (1290–1320), the Tughlaq dynasty (1320–1414), the Sayyid dynasty (1414–51), and the Lodi dynasty (1451–1526).
The Sayyid dynasty was the fourth dynasty of the Delhi Sultanate, with four rulers ruling from 1414 to 1451.

Lodi dynasty

Lodhi dynastyLodiLodhi
Five dynasties ruled over the Delhi Sultanate sequentially: the Mamluk dynasty (1206–90), the Khalji dynasty (1290–1320), the Tughlaq dynasty (1320–1414), the Sayyid dynasty (1414–51), and the Lodi dynasty (1451–1526).
The Lodi dynasty was an Afghan dynasty that ruled the Delhi Sultanate from 1451 to 1526.

Khalji dynasty

KhaljiKhaljisKhilji dynasty
Five dynasties ruled over the Delhi Sultanate sequentially: the Mamluk dynasty (1206–90), the Khalji dynasty (1290–1320), the Tughlaq dynasty (1320–1414), the Sayyid dynasty (1414–51), and the Lodi dynasty (1451–1526).
It was founded by Jalal ud din Firuz Khalji and became the second dynasty to rule the Delhi Sultanate of India.

Tughlaq dynasty

TughlaqTughluq dynastyTughluq
Five dynasties ruled over the Delhi Sultanate sequentially: the Mamluk dynasty (1206–90), the Khalji dynasty (1290–1320), the Tughlaq dynasty (1320–1414), the Sayyid dynasty (1414–51), and the Lodi dynasty (1451–1526).
The Tughlaq dynasty (Ṭughlāq or Arabic script: طغلاق ) also referred to as Tughluq or Tughluk dynasty, was a Muslim dynasty of Turko-Indian origin which ruled over the Delhi sultanate in medieval India.

Mamluk dynasty (Delhi)

MamlukMamluk dynastySlave dynasty
Five dynasties ruled over the Delhi Sultanate sequentially: the Mamluk dynasty (1206–90), the Khalji dynasty (1290–1320), the Tughlaq dynasty (1320–1414), the Sayyid dynasty (1414–51), and the Lodi dynasty (1451–1526).
The Mamluk Dynasty ruled from 1206 to 1290; it was the first of five unrelated dynasties to rule as the Delhi Sultanate till 1526.

Qutb al-Din Aibak

Qutb-ud-din AybakQutb-ud-din AibakQutb ud din Aibak
Qutb al-Din Aibak, a former Turkic Mamluk slave of Muhammad Ghori was the first sultan of Delhi, and his Mamluk dynasty conquered large areas of northern India.
He was in-charge of the Ghurid territories in northern India, and after Mu'izz ad-Din's death, he became the ruler of an independent kingdom that evolved into the Delhi Sultanate ruled by the Mamluk dynasty.

History of Islam

Islamic historyMuslim historyhistory
The sultanate is noted for being one of the few powers to repel an attack by the Mongols (from the Chagatai Khanate), causing the decline of Buddhism in East India and Bengal, and enthroning one of the few female rulers in Islamic history, Razia Sultana, who reigned from 1236 to 1240.
By the early 13th century, the Delhi Sultanate conquered much of the northern Indian subcontinent, while Turkic dynasties like the Sultanate of Rum and Artuqids conquered much of Anatolia from the Byzantine Empire throughout the 11th and 12th centuries.

Bengal

Bengal regionBengal, IndiaBengali
The sultanate is noted for being one of the few powers to repel an attack by the Mongols (from the Chagatai Khanate), causing the decline of Buddhism in East India and Bengal, and enthroning one of the few female rulers in Islamic history, Razia Sultana, who reigned from 1236 to 1240.
Following the formation of the Delhi Sultanate in the 13th century, Islam spread across the Bengal region.

Decline of Buddhism in the Indian subcontinent

decline of Buddhism in IndiaBuddhism declineddecline
The sultanate is noted for being one of the few powers to repel an attack by the Mongols (from the Chagatai Khanate), causing the decline of Buddhism in East India and Bengal, and enthroning one of the few female rulers in Islamic history, Razia Sultana, who reigned from 1236 to 1240.
and demolitions of Nalanda, Vikramasila and Odantapuri by Muhammad bin Bakhtiyar Khalji, a general of the Delhi Sultanate are thought to have severely weakened the practice of Buddhism in East India.

Razia Sultana

Razia SultanRaziaRaziyyat-ud-din Sultana
The sultanate is noted for being one of the few powers to repel an attack by the Mongols (from the Chagatai Khanate), causing the decline of Buddhism in East India and Bengal, and enthroning one of the few female rulers in Islamic history, Razia Sultana, who reigned from 1236 to 1240.
undefined 1205 – 14 October 1240) was the empress regnant of the Delhi Sultanate from 10 October 1236 to 14 October 1240.

Indo-Islamic architecture

Indo-IslamicIndianIndo-Islamic architectural
The time of their rule included the earliest forms of Indo-Islamic architecture, greater use of mechanical technology, increased growth rates in India's population and economy, and the emergence of the Hindi-Urdu language.
Succeeding the Ghurids was the Delhi Sultanate, a series of Central Asian dynasties that consolidated much of North India, and later the Mughal Empire by the 15th century.

History of India

ancient IndiaIndiaIndian history
During and in the Delhi Sultanate, there was a synthesis of Indian civilization with that of Islamic civilization, and the further integration of the Indian subcontinent with a growing world system and wider international networks spanning large parts of Afro-Eurasia, which had a significant impact on Indian culture and society, as well as the wider world.
Islamic conquests made limited inroads into modern Afghanistan and Sindh as early as the 8th century, and the Delhi Sultanate was founded in 1206 CE by Central Asian Turks who ruled a major part of the northern Indian subcontinent in the early 14th century, but declined in the late 14th century.

East India

Eastern IndiaeasternEast
The sultanate is noted for being one of the few powers to repel an attack by the Mongols (from the Chagatai Khanate), causing the decline of Buddhism in East India and Bengal, and enthroning one of the few female rulers in Islamic history, Razia Sultana, who reigned from 1236 to 1240.
Later, Muslim rulers, starting from the Delhi Sultanate initiated the preaching of Islam by building mosques.

Bengal Sultanate

Sultanate of BengalSultan of BengalBengal
This was followed by decline due to Hindu reconquests, states such as the Vijayanagara Empire and Mewar asserting independence, and new Muslim sultanates such as the Bengal Sultanate breaking off.
Bengal was gradually absorbed into the Delhi Sultanate during the 1200s.

Economic history of India

economyIndia's dominant economic powerIndia's economy
The time of their rule included the earliest forms of Indo-Islamic architecture, greater use of mechanical technology, increased growth rates in India's population and economy, and the emergence of the Hindi-Urdu language.
India experienced per capita GDP growth in the high medieval era after 1000 AD, during the Delhi Sultanate in the north and Vijayanagara Empire in the south, but was not as productive as 15th century Ming China until the 16th century.

Mughal Empire

MughalMughalsMughal India
In 1526, the Sultanate was conquered and succeeded by the Mughal Empire.
The Mughal Empire is conventionally said to have been founded in 1526 by Babur, a warrior chieftain from what today is Uzbekistan, who employed aid from the neighboring Safavid and Ottoman empires to defeat the Sultan of Delhi, Ibrahim Lodhi, in the First Battle of Panipat, and to sweep down the plains of Upper India.

Vijayanagara Empire

Vijayanagar EmpireVijayanagarVijayanagara
This was followed by decline due to Hindu reconquests, states such as the Vijayanagara Empire and Mewar asserting independence, and new Muslim sultanates such as the Bengal Sultanate breaking off.
Before the early 14th-century rise of the Vijayanagara Empire, the Hindu states of the Deccan – the Yadava Empire of Devagiri, the Kakatiya dynasty of Warangal, the Pandyan Empire of Madurai had been repeatedly raided and attacked by Muslims from the north, and by 1336 these upper Deccan region (modern day Maharashtra, Telangana) had all been defeated by armies of Sultan Alauddin Khalji and Muhammad bin Tughluq of the Delhi Sultanate.

Mongol invasions of India

invasions of IndiaMongol invasionMongol invasions
The Delhi Sultanate was also responsible for repelling the Mongol Empire's potentially devastating invasions of India in the 13th and 14th centuries.
As the Mongols progressed into the Indian hinterland and reached the outskirts of Delhi, the Delhi Sultanate led a campaign against them in which the Mongol army suffered serious defeats.

Demographics of India

populationIndianIndians
The time of their rule included the earliest forms of Indo-Islamic architecture, greater use of mechanical technology, increased growth rates in India's population and economy, and the emergence of the Hindi-Urdu language.
The population growth rate then increased in the late medieval era (during the Delhi Sultanate) from 1000 to 1500.

Spread of Islam

Muslim conquestsIslamic conquestMuslim conquest
It is also part of a longer trend predating the spread of Islam.
Muslim dynasties were soon established and subsequent empires such as those of the Abbasids, Fatimids, Almoravids, Seljukids, Ajuran, Adal and Warsangali in Somalia, Delhi, Gujarat, Malwa, Deccan, Bahmani, and Bengal Sultanates, Mughals, Mysore, Nizams, and Nawabs of Bengal in the Indian subcontinent, Ghaznavids, Ghurids and Safavids in Persia and Ayyubids and Ottomans in Anatolia were among the largest and most powerful in the world.

Iltutmish

IltumishShams-ud-din IltutmishShamsuddin Iltutmish
After Aibak died, Aram Shah assumed power in 1210, but he was assassinated in 1211 by Shams ud-Din Iltutmish.
He was the first Muslim sovereign to rule from Delhi, and is thus considered the effective founder of Delhi Sultanate.

Empire

imperialempiresimperial power
The Delhi Sultanate (, undefined) was an Islamic empire based in Delhi that stretched over large parts of the Indian subcontinent for 320 years (1206–1526).
In the Indian subcontinent, the Delhi Sultanate conquered most of the Indian peninsula and spread Islam across it.

Qutb Minar complex

Qutb complexQuwwat-ul-Islam mosqueQutub complex
Qutb al-Din Aibak initiated the construction of the Qutub Minar and the Quwwat-ul-Islam (Might of Islam) Mosque, now a UNESCO world heritage site.
The Qutb complex are monuments and buildings from the Delhi Sultanate at Mehrauli in Delhi in India.

Jalal-ud-din Khalji

Jalal ud din Firuz KhaljiJalaluddin KhaljiJalaluddin
He was succeeded by 17-year-old Muiz ud-Din Qaiqabad, who appointed Jalal ud-Din Firuz Khalji as the commander of the army.
1290-1296; died 19 July 1296) was the founder and first Sultan of the Khalji dynasty that ruled the Delhi Sultanate from 1290 to 1320.