Delirium tremens

delerium tremensalcohol withdrawal deliriumDTDTsalcohol withdrawalalcohol withdrawal seizuresdeliriumalcoholic deliriumD.TD.T.
Delirium tremens (DTs) is a rapid onset of confusion usually caused by withdrawal from alcohol.wikipedia
215 Related Articles

Barbiturate

barbituratesbarbiturate withdrawalsleeping pill
A similar syndrome may occur with benzodiazepine and barbiturate withdrawal.
As with all GABAergic drugs, barbiturate withdrawal produces potentially fatal effects such as seizures in a manner reminiscent of delirium tremens and benzodiazepine withdrawal although its more direct mechanism of GABA agonism makes barbiturate withdrawal even more severe than that of alcohol or benzodiazepines (subsequently making it one of the most dangerous withdrawals of any known addictive substance).

Epileptic seizure

seizureseizuresepileptic seizures
Occasionally, a very high body temperature or seizures may result in death.
Difficulties with withdrawal seizures commonly occurs after prolonged alcohol or sedative use, a condition known as delirium tremens.

Tactile hallucination

tactile hallucinationscenesthopathichaptic hallucinations
The main symptoms of delirium tremens are nightmares, agitation, global confusion, disorientation, visual and auditory hallucinations, tactile hallucinations, fever, high blood pressure, heavy sweating, and other signs of autonomic hyperactivity (fast heart rate and high blood pressure).
Tactile hallucinations are recurrent symptoms of neurological diseases such as schizophrenia, Parkinson's disease, Ekbom's syndrome and delerium tremens.

Drug withdrawal

withdrawalwithdrawal symptomswithdrawal syndrome
Alcohol is one of the most dangerous drugs from which to withdraw.

Alcoholic hallucinosis

alcohol-related psychosis
DT should be distinguished from alcoholic hallucinosis, the latter of which occurs in approximately 20% of hospitalized alcoholics and does not carry a significant mortality.
They can occur during acute intoxication or withdrawal with the potential of having delirium tremens.

Alcohol withdrawal syndrome

alcohol withdrawalwithdrawalalcohol
Delirium tremens (DTs) is a rapid onset of confusion usually caused by withdrawal from alcohol.
More severe symptoms may include seizures, seeing or hearing things that others do not, and delirium tremens (DTs).

Benzodiazepine

benzodiazepinesbenzodiazapinesbenzo
Benzodiazepines are the medication of choice with diazepam, lorazepam, chlordiazepoxide, and oxazepam all commonly used.
The less frequent effects are irritability, sweating, depersonalization, derealization, hypersensitivity to stimuli, depression, suicidal behavior, psychosis, seizures, and delirium tremens.

Alcoholism

alcoholicalcoholicsalcohol
About half of people with alcoholism will develop withdrawal symptoms upon reducing their use.
This can result in symptoms that include anxiety, life-threatening seizures, delirium tremens, hallucinations, shakes and possible heart failure.

Seeing pink elephants

pink elephantpink elephantssee pink elephants
Nicknames include "the horrors", "the shakes", "the bottleache", "quart mania", "ork orks", "gallon distemper", "the zoots", "barrel fever", "the 750 itch", "pint paralysis", “seeing pink elephants”.
"Seeing pink elephants" is a euphemism for drunken hallucination caused by alcoholic hallucinosis or delirium tremens.

Formication

crawling sensations in the skinhallucinate ants crawling all over her bodyparanoid delusions or sensations of insects crawling on the skin
These may be hallucinations or illusions related to the environment, e.g., patterns on the wallpaper or in the peripheral vision that the patient falsely perceives as a resemblance to the morphology of an insect, and are also associated with tactile hallucinations such as sensations of something crawling on the subject—a phenomenon known as formication.
Formication can be a result of stimulant intoxication (e.g. methamphetamine, cocaine) or alcohol withdrawal in alcoholics (i.e. delirium tremens), and is often accompanied by visual hallucinations of insects (formicanopia).

Paraldehyde

trioxane
Older drugs such as paraldehyde and clomethiazole were formerly the traditional treatment but have now largely been superseded by the benzodiazepines.
It was commonly used to induce sleep in sufferers from delirium tremens but has been replaced by other drugs in this regard.

Acamprosate

Aotal
Acamprosate is occasionally used in addition to other treatments, and is then carried on into long-term use to reduce the risk of relapse.
Thereafter, sudden alcohol abstinence causes the excessive numbers of NMDARs to be more active than normal and to contribute to the symptoms of delirium tremens and excitotoxic neuronal death.

The Lost Weekend (film)

The Lost WeekendLost Weekendfilm
In the 1945 film The Lost Weekend, Ray Milland won the Academy Award for Best Actor for his depiction of a character who experiences delirium tremens after being hospitalized, hallucinating that he saw a bat fly in and eat a mouse poking through a wall.
Bim offers to help cure his delirium tremens, but Don refuses help and then manages to escape while the staff are occupied with a raving, violent patient.

Hallucination

hallucinationshallucinatehallucinating
People may also see or hear things other people do not.
Hallucinations can be associated with drug use (particularly deliriants), sleep deprivation, psychosis, neurological disorders, and delirium tremens.

Ray Milland

R. Milland
In the 1945 film The Lost Weekend, Ray Milland won the Academy Award for Best Actor for his depiction of a character who experiences delirium tremens after being hospitalized, hallucinating that he saw a bat fly in and eat a mouse poking through a wall.
After the cast and crew had arrived on location in New York, Milland was allowed to spend a night in a psychiatric ward of Bellevue Hospital, where the patients were suffering from alcoholism and delirium tremens.

Excited delirium

Bell's maniadeliriumprolonged, violent resistance
Other medical conditions that can resemble excited delirium are panic attacks, hyperthermia, diabetes, head injury, delirium tremens, and hyperthyroidism.

Delirium

deliriousconfusionAcute confusional state
Delirium tremens (DTs) is a rapid onset of confusion usually caused by withdrawal from alcohol.

Tremor

tremblingshakingmuscle tremor
Physical effects may include shaking, shivering, irregular heart rate, and sweating.

Palpitations

palpitationheart palpitationsheart palpitation
Physical effects may include shaking, shivering, irregular heart rate, and sweating.

Hyperthermia

heat stresshyperthermicheat stroke
Occasionally, a very high body temperature or seizures may result in death.

Benzodiazepine withdrawal syndrome

benzodiazepine withdrawalwithdrawal syndromebenzodiazepine
A similar syndrome may occur with benzodiazepine and barbiturate withdrawal.

Cocaine

cokecocaine traffickingcrack
Withdrawal from stimulants such as cocaine does not have major medical complications.

Electrolyte imbalance

electrolyte problemselectrolyte disturbanceelectrolyte abnormalities
In a person with delirium tremens it is important to rule out other associated problems such as electrolyte abnormalities, pancreatitis, and alcoholic hepatitis.

Pancreatitis

inflammation of the pancreasgallstone pancreatitispancreatic inflammation
In a person with delirium tremens it is important to rule out other associated problems such as electrolyte abnormalities, pancreatitis, and alcoholic hepatitis.

Alcoholic hepatitis

In a person with delirium tremens it is important to rule out other associated problems such as electrolyte abnormalities, pancreatitis, and alcoholic hepatitis.