Democratic-Republican Party

Democratic-RepublicanDemocratic-RepublicansRepublicanDemocratic RepublicanDRJacksonianAdams-Clay Democratic-RepublicanDemocratic- RepublicanJeffersonian RepublicanJeffersonian Republicans
The Democratic-Republican Party (known at the time as the Republican Party and various other names) was an American political party founded by Thomas Jefferson and James Madison in the early 1790s that championed republicanism, political equality, and expansionism.wikipedia
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Thomas Jefferson

JeffersonPresident JeffersonJeffersonian
The Democratic-Republican Party (known at the time as the Republican Party and various other names) was an American political party founded by Thomas Jefferson and James Madison in the early 1790s that championed republicanism, political equality, and expansionism.
Jefferson and James Madison organized the Democratic-Republican Party to oppose the Federalist Party during the formation of the First Party System.

Political parties in the United States

political partiespolitical partypolitical party in the United States
The Democratic-Republican Party (known at the time as the Republican Party and various other names) was an American political party founded by Thomas Jefferson and James Madison in the early 1790s that championed republicanism, political equality, and expansionism.
The first two-party system consisted of the Federalist Party, who supported the ratification of the Constitution, and the Democratic-Republican Party or the Anti-Administration party (Anti-Federalists), who opposed the powerful central government, among others, that the Constitution established when it took effect in 1789.

James Madison

MadisonPresident MadisonPresident James Madison
The Democratic-Republican Party (known at the time as the Republican Party and various other names) was an American political party founded by Thomas Jefferson and James Madison in the early 1790s that championed republicanism, political equality, and expansionism.
He co-wrote The Federalist Papers, co-founded the Democratic-Republican Party, and served as the fifth United States secretary of State from 1801 to 1809.

History of the United States Democratic Party

Democratic PartyDemocraticDemocrat
One faction of the Democratic-Republicans eventually coalesced into the modern Democratic Party, while the other faction ultimately formed the core of the Whig Party.
The Democratic Party is the oldest voter-based political party in the world and the oldest existing political party in the United States, tracing its heritage back to the anti-Federalists and the Jeffersonian Democratic-Republican Party of the 1790s.

John Adams

AdamsJohnPresident John Adams
Though he was defeated by Federalist John Adams in the 1796 presidential election, Jefferson and his Democratic-Republican allies came into power following the 1800 elections. In the 1792 election, Washington effectively ran unopposed for president, but Jefferson and Madison backed New York Governor George Clinton's unsuccessful attempt to unseat Vice President John Adams.
During his single term, Adams encountered fierce criticism from the Jeffersonian Republicans and from some in his own Federalist Party, led by his rival Alexander Hamilton.

Whig Party (United States)

WhigWhig PartyWhigs
One faction of the Democratic-Republicans eventually coalesced into the modern Democratic Party, while the other faction ultimately formed the core of the Whig Party.
The Whigs had some links to the defunct Federalist Party, but the Whig Party was not a direct successor to that party and many Whig leaders, including Clay, had aligned with the rival Democratic-Republican Party.

1824 United States presidential election

18241824 presidential election1824 election
The Democratic-Republicans became increasingly dominant after the 1800 elections as the opposing Federalist Party collapsed, and the party splintered during the 1824 presidential election. Lacking an effective opposition, the Democratic-Republicans split into groups after the 1824 presidential election; one faction supported President John Quincy Adams, while the other faction backed General Andrew Jackson.
The Democratic-Republican Party had won six consecutive presidential elections and was the only national political party.

Alexander Hamilton

HamiltonHamiltonianA. Hamilton
The Democratic-Republican Party originated as a faction in Congress that opposed the centralizing policies of Alexander Hamilton, who served as Secretary of the Treasury under President George Washington.
Hamilton played a central role in the Federalist party, which dominated national and state politics until it lost the election of 1800 to Jefferson's Democratic-Republican Party.

Jay Treaty

Jay's TreatyJay Treaty of 1794treaty
The Democratic-Republicans and the opposing Federalist Party each became more cohesive during Washington's second term, partly as a result of the debate over the Jay Treaty.
It inflamed the new growth of two opposing parties in every state, the pro-Treaty Federalists and the anti-Treaty Jeffersonian Republicans.

1796 United States presidential election

17961796 presidential election1796 election
Though he was defeated by Federalist John Adams in the 1796 presidential election, Jefferson and his Democratic-Republican allies came into power following the 1800 elections.
Incumbent Vice President John Adams of the Federalist Party defeated former Secretary of State Thomas Jefferson of the Democratic-Republican Party.

John Quincy Adams

AdamsJohn QuincyJohn Q. Adams
Lacking an effective opposition, the Democratic-Republicans split into groups after the 1824 presidential election; one faction supported President John Quincy Adams, while the other faction backed General Andrew Jackson.
Initially a Federalist like his father, he won election to the presidency as a member of the Democratic-Republican Party, and in the mid-1830s became affiliated with the Whig Party.

Republicanism in the United States

republicanismRepublicanAmerican republicanism
The Democratic-Republican Party (known at the time as the Republican Party and various other names) was an American political party founded by Thomas Jefferson and James Madison in the early 1790s that championed republicanism, political equality, and expansionism.
Two major parties have used the term in their name – the Republican Party of Thomas Jefferson (founded in 1793, and often called the 'Jeffersonian Republican Party'), and the current Republican Party, founded in 1854 and named after the Jeffersonian party.

1800 United States elections

1800 electionsUnited States elections, 18001800 election
Though he was defeated by Federalist John Adams in the 1796 presidential election, Jefferson and his Democratic-Republican allies came into power following the 1800 elections. The Democratic-Republicans became increasingly dominant after the 1800 elections as the opposing Federalist Party collapsed, and the party splintered during the 1824 presidential election.
The Democratic-Republican Party won control of the Presidency and both houses of Congress for the first time.

National Republican Party

Anti-JacksonianNational RepublicanNational Republicans
Jackson's faction eventually coalesced into the Democratic Party, while supporters of Adams became known as the National Republican Party, which itself later merged into the Whig Party.
The National Republican Party, also known as the Anti-Jacksonian Party, was a political party in the United States that evolved from faction of the Democratic-Republican Party that supported John Quincy Adams in the 1824 presidential election.

Era of Good Feelings

Era of Good Feelingreestablishment of normal diplomatic relationsThe Era of Good Feelings
The Federalists collapsed after 1815, beginning a period known as the Era of Good Feelings.
The era saw the collapse of the Federalist Party and an end to the bitter partisan disputes between it and the dominant Democratic-Republican Party during the First Party System.

War of 1812

The War of 1812American War of 1812war
Madison succeeded Jefferson as president in 1809 and led the country during the largely-inconclusive War of 1812 with Britain.
Historian Alan Taylor says that many Democratic-Republican congressmen "longed to oust the British from the continent and to annex Canada", such as Richard M. Johnson, John A. Harper, and Peter B. Porter.

States' rights

states rightsstate's rightsstate sovereignty
After the war, Madison and his congressional allies established the Second Bank of the United States and implemented protective tariffs, marking a move away from the party's earlier emphasis on states' rights and a strict construction of the United States Constitution.
The Kentucky and Virginia Resolutions, which became part of the Principles of '98, along with the supporting Report of 1800 by Madison, became final documents of Jefferson's Democratic-Republican Party.

American frontier

Old WestWild WestAmerican Old West
The Democratic-Republicans were strongest in the South and the western frontier, and weakest in New England.
Federalists opposed the expansion, but Jeffersonians hailed the opportunity to create millions of new farms to expand the domain of land-owning yeomen; the ownership would strengthen the ideal republican society, based on agriculture (not commerce), governed lightly, and promoting self-reliance and virtue, as well as form the political base for Jeffersonian Democracy.

National Gazette

The National Gazette
Jefferson and Madison established the National Gazette, a newspaper which recast national politics not as a battle between Federalists and Anti-Federalists, but as a debate between aristocrats and republicans.
The National Gazette was a Democratic-Republican partisan newspaper that was first published on October 31, 1791.

Andrew Jackson

JacksonJacksonianPresident Andrew Jackson
Lacking an effective opposition, the Democratic-Republicans split into groups after the 1824 presidential election; one faction supported President John Quincy Adams, while the other faction backed General Andrew Jackson.
He was a member of the Democratic-Republican Party, the dominant party in Tennessee.

Aaron Burr

Aaron Burr, Jr.Aaron Burr Jr.Burr, Aaron
Nonetheless, the Democratic-Republican congressional nominating caucus chose Jefferson as the party's presidential nominee on the belief that he would be the party's strongest candidate; the caucus chose Senator Aaron Burr of New York as Jefferson's running mate.
As campaign manager for the Democratic-Republican party during the presidential election of 1800, Burr (along with his unofficial campaign team, known as the Little Band) was responsible for the first open, public political campaign.

United States Electoral College

Electoral Collegepresidential electorelectoral votes
In the 1788–89 presidential election, the first such election following the ratification of the United States Constitution in 1788, George Washington won the votes of every member of the Electoral College.
Finishing in second place was Democratic-Republican Party candidate Thomas Jefferson, the Federalists' opponent, who became the vice president.

1792 United States presidential election

17921792 election1792 presidential election
In the 1792 election, Washington effectively ran unopposed for president, but Jefferson and Madison backed New York Governor George Clinton's unsuccessful attempt to unseat Vice President John Adams.
The Democratic-Republican Party, which had organized in opposition to the policies of Secretary of the Treasury Alexander Hamilton, supported Clinton for the position of vice president.

1800 United States presidential election

18001800 presidential electionelection of 1800
In the 1800 presidential election, the Democratic-Republicans once again nominated a ticket of Jefferson and Burr.
In what is sometimes referred to as the "Revolution of 1800", Vice President Thomas Jefferson of the Democratic-Republican Party defeated incumbent President John Adams of the Federalist Party.

Albert Gallatin

GallatinistAbraham Alfonse Albert GallatinGallatin
He appointed a geographically balanced and ideologically moderate Cabinet that included Madison as Secretary of State and Albert Gallatin as Secretary of the Treasury; Federalists were excluded from the Cabinet, but Jefferson appointed some prominent Federalists and allowed many other Federalists to keep their positions.
As leader of the Democratic-Republican Party he served in various federal elective and appointed positions across four decades.