Democratic Party (United States)

DemocraticDemocratDemocratic PartyDDemocratsDem(D)U.S. Democratic PartyUnited States Democratic Party Democratic
The Democratic Party is one of the two major contemporary political parties in the United States, along with the Republican Party.wikipedia
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Republican Party (United States)

RepublicanRepublican PartyR
The Democratic Party is one of the two major contemporary political parties in the United States, along with the Republican Party.
The Republican Party, also referred to as the GOP (Grand Old Party), is one of the two major political parties in the United States, the other being its historic rival, the Democratic Party.

1912 United States presidential election

19121912 presidential election1912 election
In 1912, Theodore Roosevelt ran as a third-party candidate in the Progressive ("Bull Moose") Party, beginning a switch of political platforms between the Democratic and Republican Party over the coming decades, and leading to Woodrow Wilson being elected as the first fiscally progressive Democrat.
Democratic Governor Woodrow Wilson of New Jersey unseated incumbent Republican President William Howard Taft and defeated former President Theodore Roosevelt, who ran as the Progressive Party ("Bull Moose") nominee.

Congressional Progressive Caucus

Progressive CaucusCPCProgressive
Today, the House Democratic caucus is composed mostly of centrists and progressives, with a small minority of conservative Democrats.
The Congressional Progressive Caucus (CPC) is a caucus within the Democratic congressional caucus in the United States Congress.

New Democrat Coalition

centristsNDCNew Coalition
Today, the House Democratic caucus is composed mostly of centrists and progressives, with a small minority of conservative Democrats.
The New Democrat Coalition is a Congressional Member Organization within the United States Congress made up of centrist, capitalist Democrats who support an agenda that the organization describes as "moderate" and "pro-growth" and support a balanced budget.

Blue Dog Coalition

Blue DogBlue Dog DemocratBlue Dog Democrats
Today, the House Democratic caucus is composed mostly of centrists and progressives, with a small minority of conservative Democrats.
The Blue Dog Coalition, commonly known as the Blue Dogs or Blue Dog Democrats, is a caucus of United States Congressional Representatives from the Democratic Party who identify as fiscally-responsible, centrist Democrats.

New Deal coalition

New DealNew Deal Democratscoalition
Since Franklin D. Roosevelt and his New Deal coalition in the 1930s, the Democratic Party has also promoted a social liberal platform, supporting social justice.
The New Deal coalition was the alignment of interest groups and voting blocs in the United States that supported the New Deal and voted for Democratic presidential candidates from 1932 until the late 1960s.

Two-party system

two party systemmajority partytwo-party
The Democratic Party is one of the two major contemporary political parties in the United States, along with the Republican Party.
Generally, a two-party system becomes a dichotomous division of the political spectrum with an ostensibly right-wing and left-wing party: the Nationalist Party vs. the Labour Party in Malta, Liberal/National Coalition vs. Labor in Australia, Republicans vs. Democrats in the United States and the Conservative Party vs. the Labour Party in the United Kingdom.

Modern liberalism in the United States

liberalliberalsLiberalism
The party's philosophy of modern liberalism advocates social and economic equality, along with the welfare state. The party has united with smaller liberal regional parties throughout the country, such as the Farmer–Labor Party in Minnesota and the Nonpartisan League in North Dakota.
The conservative northern Republicans and the conservative southern Democrats formed the Conservative Coalition which dominated the US congress in the pre-Civil Rights era.

North Dakota Democratic–Nonpartisan League Party

Democratic-NPLDem-NPLDemocratic-NPL Party
The party has united with smaller liberal regional parties throughout the country, such as the Farmer–Labor Party in Minnesota and the Nonpartisan League in North Dakota.
The North Dakota Democratic–Nonpartisan League Party (abbreviated Democratic-NPL, D-NPL) is the North Dakota affiliate of the Democratic Party of the United States.

Barack Obama

ObamaPresident ObamaPresident Barack Obama
The most recent was the forty-fourth President Barack Obama, who held the office from 2009 to 2017.
A member of the Democratic Party, he was the first African American to be elected to the presidency.

Democratic-Republican Party

Democratic-RepublicanDemocratic-RepublicansRepublican
Tracing its heritage back to Thomas Jefferson and James Madison's Democratic-Republican Party, the modern-day Democratic Party was founded around 1828 by supporters of Andrew Jackson, making it the world's oldest active political party.
The party splintered in 1824, with the faction loyal to Andrew Jackson coalescing into the Jacksonian movement (which would soon acquire the name Democratic Party), the faction led by John Quincy Adams and Henry Clay forming the National Republican Party and some other groups going on to form the Anti-Masonic Party.

Theodore Roosevelt

Teddy RooseveltRooseveltPresident Theodore Roosevelt
In 1912, Theodore Roosevelt ran as a third-party candidate in the Progressive ("Bull Moose") Party, beginning a switch of political platforms between the Democratic and Republican Party over the coming decades, and leading to Woodrow Wilson being elected as the first fiscally progressive Democrat.
He ran in the 1912 election and the split allowed the Democratic nominee Woodrow Wilson to win the election.

Minnesota Democratic–Farmer–Labor Party

DemocratDFLDemocratic-Farmer-Labor
The party has united with smaller liberal regional parties throughout the country, such as the Farmer–Labor Party in Minnesota and the Nonpartisan League in North Dakota.
It is affiliated with the U.S. Democratic Party.

San Francisco

San Francisco, CaliforniaSan Francisco, CACity and County of San Francisco
Following the 2018 midterm elections, the Democrats are the opposition party as of 2019, due to having the minority of seats in the Senate, as well as having the minority of governorships and state legislatures (full control of 17/50, split control of one other); However, they do have the majority in the House of Representatives, "trifectas" (the executive branch and both chambers of the legislative branch) in 14 states, and the mayoralty of numerous major American cities, such as Boston, Chicago, Los Angeles, Philadelphia, New York City, San Francisco, Seattle, and Washington, D.C. In the Supreme Court, four of the nine seats are filled by justices appointed by Democratic presidents.
Politically, the city votes strongly along liberal Democratic Party lines.

List of United States state legislatures

state legislaturesLegislativelegislative branch
Following the 2018 midterm elections, the Democrats are the opposition party as of 2019, due to having the minority of seats in the Senate, as well as having the minority of governorships and state legislatures (full control of 17/50, split control of one other); However, they do have the majority in the House of Representatives, "trifectas" (the executive branch and both chambers of the legislative branch) in 14 states, and the mayoralty of numerous major American cities, such as Boston, Chicago, Los Angeles, Philadelphia, New York City, San Francisco, Seattle, and Washington, D.C. In the Supreme Court, four of the nine seats are filled by justices appointed by Democratic presidents.

Franklin D. Roosevelt

RooseveltFranklin RooseveltPresident Roosevelt
Since Franklin D. Roosevelt and his New Deal coalition in the 1930s, the Democratic Party has also promoted a social liberal platform, supporting social justice.
A Democrat, he won a record four presidential elections and became a central figure in world events during the first half of the 20th century.

American Jews

JewishJewish-AmericanJewish American
People living in metropolitan areas, women, sexual minorities, millennials, college graduates, and racial and ethnic minorities in the United States, such as Jewish Americans, Hispanic Americans, Asian Americans, Arab Americans and African Americans, tend to support the Democratic Party much more than they support the rival Republican Party.
Many Jews rose to leadership positions in the early 20th century American labor movement and helped to found unions that played a major role in left wing politics and, after 1936, in Democratic Party politics.

Stephen A. Douglas

DouglasStephen DouglasDouglas Democrat
The Northern Democrats nominated Senator Stephen A. Douglas of Illinois for President and former Governor of Georgia Herschel V. Johnson for Vice President while some Southern Democrats joined the Constitutional Union Party, backing its nominees (who had both been prominent Whig leaders), John Bell of Tennessee for President and the politician, statesman and educator Edward Everett of Massachusetts for Vice President.
He was the Democratic Party nominee for president in the 1860 election, but he was defeated by Republican candidate Abraham Lincoln.

John C. Breckinridge

BreckinridgeJohn BreckinridgeJohn Breckenridge
The radical pro-slavery Fire-Eaters led a walkout at both the April Democratic convention in Charleston's Institute Hall and the June convention in Baltimore when the national party would not adopt a resolution supporting the extension of slavery into territories even if the voters of those territories did not want it. These Southern Democrats nominated the pro-slavery incumbent Vice President, John C. Breckinridge of Kentucky, for President and General Joseph Lane, former Governor of Oregon, for Vice President.
After non-combat service during the Mexican–American War, he was elected as a Democrat to the Kentucky House of Representatives in 1849, where he took a states' rights position against interference with slavery.

Political parties in the United States

political partiespolitical partyparty
The Democratic Party is one of the two major contemporary political parties in the United States, along with the Republican Party.
Two major parties dominated the political landscape: the Whig Party, led by Henry Clay, that grew from the National Republican Party; and the Democratic Party, led by Andrew Jackson.

Benjamin Tillman

Ben TillmanBenjamin R. TillmanPitchfork Ben Tillman
After Redeemers ended Reconstruction in the 1870s and following the often extremely violent disenfranchisement of African Americans led by such white supremacist Democratic politicians as Benjamin Tillman of South Carolina in the 1880s and 1890s, the South, voting Democratic, became known as the "Solid South".
Benjamin Ryan Tillman (August 11, 1847 – July 3, 1918) was an American politician of the Democratic Party who served as Governor of South Carolina from 1890 to 1894, and a United States Senator from 1895 until his death in 1918.

Solid South

solidly Democratic Southwas a givena Democratic bastion
After Redeemers ended Reconstruction in the 1870s and following the often extremely violent disenfranchisement of African Americans led by such white supremacist Democratic politicians as Benjamin Tillman of South Carolina in the 1880s and 1890s, the South, voting Democratic, became known as the "Solid South".
The Solid South or Southern bloc was the electoral voting bloc of the states of the Southern United States for issues that were regarded as particularly important to the interests of Democrats in the southern states.

Grover Cleveland

ClevelandPresident ClevelandPresident Grover Cleveland
Fifteen Democrats have served as President under sixteen administrations: the first was seventh President Andrew Jackson, who served from 1829 to 1837; Grover Cleveland served two nonconsecutive terms from 1885 to 1889 and 1893 to 1897; and thus is counted twice (as the twenty-second and twenty-fourth President).
From his earliest involvement in politics, Cleveland aligned with the Democratic Party.

1860 United States presidential election

1860 presidential election18601860 election
The Northern Democrats nominated Senator Stephen A. Douglas of Illinois for President and former Governor of Georgia Herschel V. Johnson for Vice President while some Southern Democrats joined the Constitutional Union Party, backing its nominees (who had both been prominent Whig leaders), John Bell of Tennessee for President and the politician, statesman and educator Edward Everett of Massachusetts for Vice President. The radical pro-slavery Fire-Eaters led a walkout at both the April Democratic convention in Charleston's Institute Hall and the June convention in Baltimore when the national party would not adopt a resolution supporting the extension of slavery into territories even if the voters of those territories did not want it. These Southern Democrats nominated the pro-slavery incumbent Vice President, John C. Breckinridge of Kentucky, for President and General Joseph Lane, former Governor of Oregon, for Vice President. The Democrats split over the choice of a successor to President James Buchanan along Northern and Southern lines as factions of the party provided two separate candidacies for President in the election of 1860, in which the Republican Party gained ascendancy.
Incumbent President James Buchanan, like his predecessor Franklin Pierce, was a northern Democrat with sympathies for the South.

William McKinley

McKinleyPresident McKinleyPresident William McKinley
Bryan waged a vigorous campaign attacking Eastern moneyed interests, but he lost to Republican William McKinley.
His 1890 McKinley Tariff was highly controversial, which together with a Democratic redistricting aimed at gerrymandering him out of office led to his defeat in the Democratic landslide of 1890.