Democratic Party (United States)

DemocraticDemocratDemocratic PartyDDemocratsUnited States Democratic PartyDemU.S. Democratic Party(D)D-C
The Democratic Party is one of the two major contemporary political parties in the United States, along with its main rival, the Republican Party.wikipedia
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Republican Party (United States)

RepublicanRepublican PartyR
The Democratic Party is one of the two major contemporary political parties in the United States, along with its main rival, the Republican Party.
The Republican Party, also referred to as the GOP (Grand Old Party), is one of the two major political parties in the United States; the other is its historic rival, the Democratic Party.

Conservative Democrat

Conservative DemocratsconservativeDemocratic
Well into the 20th century, the party had conservative pro-business and Southern conservative-populist wings; following the New Deal, however, the conservative wing of the party largely withered outside the South.
In American politics, a conservative Democrat is a member of the Democratic Party with conservative political views, or with views that are fiscally or socially conservative compared to the positions taken by the Democratic Party.

New Deal coalition

New DealNew Deal Democratscoalition
Since Franklin D. Roosevelt and his New Deal coalition in the 1930s, the Democratic Party has promoted a social liberal platform.
The New Deal coalition was the alignment of interest groups and voting blocs in the United States that supported the New Deal and voted for Democratic presidential candidates from 1932 until the late 1960s.

Barack Obama

ObamaPresident ObamaPresident Barack Obama
The most recent was Barack Obama, who was the 44th and held office from 2009 to 2017.
A member of the Democratic Party, he was the first African American to be elected to the presidency.

Two-party system

two party systemmajority partytwo major parties
The Democratic Party is one of the two major contemporary political parties in the United States, along with its main rival, the Republican Party.
Generally, a two-party system becomes a dichotomous division of the political spectrum with an ostensibly right-wing and left-wing party: the Nationalist Party vs. the Labour Party in Malta, Liberal/National Coalition vs. Labor in Australia, Republicans vs. Democrats in the United States and the Conservative Party vs. the Labour Party in the United Kingdom.

Modern liberalism in the United States

liberalliberalsLiberalism
The Democratic Party's philosophy of modern liberalism advocates social and economic equality, along with the welfare state.
Since the 1960s, the Democratic Party is considered liberal and the Republican Party is considered conservative.

Whig Party (United States)

WhigWhig PartyWhigs
That party also inspired the Whigs and modern Republicans.
Alongside the Democratic Party, it was one of the two major parties in the United States during the late 1830s, the 1840s, and the early 1850s, part of the period some scholars describe as the Second Party System.

Kansas–Nebraska Act

Kansas-Nebraska ActKansas–Nebraska BillKansas-Nebraska Bill
In 1854, angry with the Kansas–Nebraska Act, anti-slavery Democrats left the party and joined Northern Whigs to form the Republican Party.
It was drafted by Democratic Senator Stephen A. Douglas, passed by the 33rd United States Congress, and signed into law by President Franklin Pierce.

Stephen A. Douglas

Stephen DouglasDouglasStephen Arnold Douglas
The Northern Democrats nominated Senator Stephen A. Douglas of Illinois for President and former Governor of Georgia Herschel V. Johnson for Vice President while some Southern Democrats joined the Constitutional Union Party, backing its nominees (who had both been prominent Whig leaders), John Bell of Tennessee for President and the politician, statesman and educator Edward Everett of Massachusetts for Vice President.
He was the Democratic Party nominee for president in the 1860 election, but he was defeated by Republican candidate Abraham Lincoln.

List of United States state legislatures

state legislaturesLegislativelegislative branch
As of 2019, the Democrats hold a majority in the House of Representatives, 15 state government trifectas (governorship and both legislative chambers), the mayoralty of numerous major American cities, and 19 total state legislatures.

John C. Breckinridge

BreckinridgeJohn Cabell BreckinridgeJohn Breckinridge
These Southern Democrats nominated the pro-slavery incumbent Vice President, John C. Breckinridge of Kentucky, for President and General Joseph Lane, former Governor of Oregon, for Vice President.
After serving as a non-combatant during the Mexican–American War, he was elected as a Democrat to the Kentucky House of Representatives in 1849, where he took a states' rights position against interference with slavery.

Southern strategy

Southern states Republican realignmentappealed to white Southern Democrats
After the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Voting Rights Act of 1965, the core bases of the two parties shifted, with the Southern states becoming more reliably Republican in presidential politics and the Northeastern states becoming more reliably Democratic. Republicans attracted conservatives and white Southerners from the Democratic coalition with their use of the Southern strategy and resistance to New Deal and Great Society liberalism.
From 1948 to 1984, the Southern states, for decades a stronghold for the Democrats, became key swing states, providing the popular vote margins in the 1960, 1968 and 1976 elections.

Benjamin Tillman

Ben TillmanBenjamin R. TillmanBenjamin Ryan Tillman
After Redeemers ended Reconstruction in the 1870s and following the often extremely violent disenfranchisement of African Americans led by such white supremacist Democratic politicians as Benjamin Tillman of South Carolina in the 1880s and 1890s, the South, voting Democratic, became known as the "Solid South".
Benjamin Ryan Tillman (August 11, 1847 – July 3, 1918) was an American politician of the Democratic Party who served as Governor of South Carolina from 1890 to 1894, and a United States Senator from 1895 until his death in 1918.

Solid South

solidly Democratic Southwas a givena Democratic bastion
After Redeemers ended Reconstruction in the 1870s and following the often extremely violent disenfranchisement of African Americans led by such white supremacist Democratic politicians as Benjamin Tillman of South Carolina in the 1880s and 1890s, the South, voting Democratic, became known as the "Solid South".
The Solid South or Southern bloc was the electoral voting bloc of the states of the Southern United States for issues that were regarded as particularly important to the interests of Democrats in those states.

1860 United States presidential election

1860 presidential election18601860 election
The Northern Democrats nominated Senator Stephen A. Douglas of Illinois for President and former Governor of Georgia Herschel V. Johnson for Vice President while some Southern Democrats joined the Constitutional Union Party, backing its nominees (who had both been prominent Whig leaders), John Bell of Tennessee for President and the politician, statesman and educator Edward Everett of Massachusetts for Vice President. These Southern Democrats nominated the pro-slavery incumbent Vice President, John C. Breckinridge of Kentucky, for President and General Joseph Lane, former Governor of Oregon, for Vice President. The Democrats split over the choice of a successor to President James Buchanan along Northern and Southern lines as factions of the party provided two separate candidacies for President in the election of 1860, in which the Republican Party gained ascendancy.
Incumbent President James Buchanan, like his predecessor Franklin Pierce, was a northern Democrat with sympathies for the South.

Samuel J. Tilden

Samuel TildenTildenSamuel Jones Tilden
The party was dominated by pro-business Bourbon Democrats led by Samuel J. Tilden and Grover Cleveland, who represented mercantile, banking, and railroad interests; opposed imperialism and overseas expansion; fought for the gold standard; opposed bimetallism; and crusaded against corruption, high taxes and tariffs.
Samuel Jones Tilden (February 9, 1814 – August 4, 1886) was the 25th Governor of New York and the Democratic candidate for president in the disputed election of 1876.

William McKinley

McKinleyPresident McKinleyPresident William McKinley
Bryan waged a vigorous campaign attacking Eastern moneyed interests, but he lost to Republican William McKinley.
His 1890 McKinley Tariff was highly controversial, which together with a Democratic redistricting aimed at gerrymandering him out of office led to his defeat in the Democratic landslide of 1890.

Franklin D. Roosevelt

Franklin Delano RooseveltFranklin RooseveltRoosevelt
Since Franklin D. Roosevelt and his New Deal coalition in the 1930s, the Democratic Party has promoted a social liberal platform.
A member of the Democratic Party, he won a record four presidential elections and became a central figure in world events during the first half of the 20th century.

Political parties in the United States

political partiespolitical partypolitical party in the United States
The Democratic Party is one of the two major contemporary political parties in the United States, along with its main rival, the Republican Party.
Two major parties dominated the political landscape: the Whig Party, led by Henry Clay, that grew from the National Republican Party; and the Democratic Party, led by Andrew Jackson.

1884 United States presidential election

18841884 presidential electionelection of 1884
Cleveland was elected to non-consecutive presidential terms in 1884 and 1892.
It saw the first election of a Democrat as President of the United States since 1856.

Henry Clay

ClayHenry Clay, Sr.Clay, Henry
Opposing factions led by Henry Clay helped form the Whig Party.
Despite receiving support from Clay and other National Republicans, Adams was defeated by Democrat Andrew Jackson in the 1828 presidential election.

1864 United States presidential election

18641864 presidential election1864 election
Most War Democrats rallied to Republican President Abraham Lincoln and the Republicans' National Union Party in the election of 1864, which featured Andrew Johnson on the Republican ticket even though he was a Democrat from the South.
In the midst of the American Civil War, incumbent President Abraham Lincoln of the National Union Party easily defeated the Democratic nominee, former General George B. McClellan, by a wide margin of 221–21 electoral votes, with 55% of the popular vote.

Great Society

National Data BankThe Great SocietyCivil Rights Act
Republicans attracted conservatives and white Southerners from the Democratic coalition with their use of the Southern strategy and resistance to New Deal and Great Society liberalism.
The Great Society was a set of domestic programs in the United States launched by Democratic President Lyndon B. Johnson in 1964–65.

American Civil War

Civil WarU.S. Civil WarUnited States Civil War
As the American Civil War broke out, Northern Democrats were divided into War Democrats and Peace Democrats.
The three pro-Union candidates together received an overwhelming 82% majority of the votes cast nationally: Republican Lincoln's votes centered in the north, Democrat Stephen A. Douglas' votes were distributed nationally and Constitutional Unionist John Bell's votes centered in Tennessee, Kentucky, and Virginia.

New Frontier

Manpower Development and Training ActAccelerated Public Works ActJFK speech
In his agenda dubbed the New Frontier, Kennedy introduced a host of social programs and public works projects, along with enhanced support of the space program, proposing a manned spacecraft trip to the moon by the end of the decade.
The term New Frontier was used by Democratic presidential candidate John F. Kennedy in his acceptance speech in the 1960 United States presidential election to the Democratic National Convention at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum as the Democratic slogan to inspire America to support him.