Official campaign portrait, 1944
Andrew Jackson was the seventh president of the United States (1829–1837) and the first Democratic president.
Abraham Lincoln, 16th president of the United States (1861–1865) and the first Republican to hold the office
Eleanor and Franklin with their first two children, 1908
Martin Van Buren was the eighth president of the United States (1837–1841) and the second Democratic president.
Charles R. Jennison, an anti-slavery militia leader associated with the Jayhawkers from Kansas and an early Republican politician in the region
Roosevelt in 1944
Senator Stephen A. Douglas
Ulysses S. Grant, 18th president of the United States (1869–1877)
Roosevelt supported Governor Woodrow Wilson in the 1912 presidential election.
The 1885 inauguration of Grover Cleveland, the only president with non-consecutive terms
James G. Blaine, 28th & 31st Secretary of State (1881; 1889–1892)
Theodore Roosevelt was Franklin Roosevelt's distant cousin and an important influence on his career.
Leaders of the Democratic Party during the first half of the 20th century on 14 June 1913: Secretary of State William J. Bryan, Josephus Daniels, President Woodrow Wilson, Breckinridge Long, William Phillips, and Franklin D. Roosevelt
William McKinley, 25th president of the United States (1897–1901)
Roosevelt as Assistant Secretary of the Navy, 1913
Franklin D. Roosevelt and Harry S. Truman, 32nd and 33rd presidents of the United States (1933–1945; 1945–1953), featured on a campaign poster for the 1944 presidential election
Theodore Roosevelt, 26th president of the United States (1901–1909)
Cox and Roosevelt in Ohio, 1920
John F. Kennedy and Lyndon B. Johnson, 35th and 36th presidents of the United States (1961–1963, 1963–1969)
Herbert Hoover, 31st president of the United States (1929–1933)
Rare photograph of Roosevelt in a wheelchair, with Fala and Ruthie Bie, the daughter of caretakers at his Hyde Park estate. Photo taken by his cousin Margaret Suckley (February 1941).
Jimmy Carter, 39th president of the United States (1977–1981), delivering the State of the Union Address in 1979
Ronald Reagan, 40th president of the United States (1981–1989)
Gov. Roosevelt with his predecessor Al Smith, 1930
Bill Clinton, 42nd president of the United States (1993–2001), at The Pentagon in 1998
Donald Trump, 45th president of the United States (2017–2021)
Results of the 1930 gubernatorial election in New York
Barack Obama speaking to College Democrats of America in 2007
Calvin Coolidge, 30th president of the United States (1923–1929)
Roosevelt in the early 1930s
President Barack Obama meeting with the Blue Dog Coalition in the State Dining Room of the White House in 2009
Arnold Schwarzenegger, 38th governor of California (2003–2011)
1932 electoral vote results
Eleanor Roosevelt at the 1956 Democratic National Convention in Chicago
John McCain, United States senator from Arizona (1987–2018)
Roosevelt signs the Social Security Act into law, August 14, 1935
President Barack Obama signing the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act into law at the White House on March 23, 2010
Donald Rumsfeld, 21st United States Secretary of Defense (2001–2006)
1936 re-election handbill for Roosevelt promoting his economic policy
Secretary of State John Kerry addressing delegates at the United Nations before signing the Paris Agreement on April 22, 2016
Colin Powell, 65th United States Secretary of State (2001–2005)
1936 electoral vote results
Shirley Chisholm was the first major-party African American candidate to run nationwide primary campaigns.
Newt Gingrich, 50th Speaker of the House of Representatives (1995–1999)
Roosevelt with Brazilian President Getúlio Vargas and other dignitaries in Brazil, 1936
President Lyndon B. Johnson signing the Immigration Act of 1965 as Vice President Hubert Humphrey, Senators Edward M. Kennedy and Robert F. Kennedy and others look on
Annual population growth in the U.S. by county - 2010s
The Roosevelts with King George VI and Queen Elizabeth, sailing from Washington, D.C., to Mount Vernon, Virginia, on the USS Potomac during the first U.S. visit of a reigning British monarch (June 9, 1939)
Then-Senator Barack Obama shaking hands with an American soldier in Basra, Iraq in 2008
This map shows the vote in the 2020 presidential election by county.
Foreign trips of Roosevelt during his presidency
President Jimmy Carter and Israeli Prime Minister Menachem Begin in 1978
Political Spectrum Libertarian Left    Centrist   Right  Authoritarian
1940 electoral vote results
Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu meeting with President Barack Obama at Ben Gurion Airport in 2013
U.S. opinion on gun control issues is deeply divided along political lines, as shown in this 2021 survey.
Roosevelt and Winston Churchill aboard HMS Prince of Wales for 1941 Atlantic Charter meeting
Self-identified Democrats (blue) versus self-identified Republicans (red) (January–June 2010 data)
Territory controlled by the Allies (blue and red) and the Axis Powers (black) in June 1942
Higher percentages of Democrats than Republicans are members of union households.
The Allies (blue and red) and the Axis Powers (black) in December 1944
Elected at age 33, Jon Ossoff is currently the youngest member of the U.S. Senate.
1944 electoral vote results
Hillary Clinton was the first woman to be nominated for president by a major party.
Official portrait of President Roosevelt by Frank O. Salisbury, c. 1947
Secretary of Transportation Pete Buttigieg
200x200px
Vice President Kamala Harris
Julián Castro served as Secretary of Housing and Urban Development.
U.S. Senator Tammy Duckworth
Secretary of the Interior Deb Haaland
Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi
U.S. Senator Kyrsten Sinema
Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer
U.S. opinion on gun control issues is deeply divided along political lines, as shown in this 2021 survey.

Its main political rival has been the Republican Party since the 1850s.

- Democratic Party (United States)

Since the mid-1850s, it has been the main political rival of the Democratic Party.

- Republican Party (United States)

As a member of the Democratic Party, he won a record four presidential elections and became a central figure in world events during the first half of the 20th century.

- Franklin D. Roosevelt

Since Franklin D. Roosevelt and his New Deal coalition after 1932, the Democratic Party has promoted a social liberal platform.

- Democratic Party (United States)

In the 1932 presidential election, Roosevelt defeated Republican incumbent Herbert Hoover in one of the largest landslide victories in US history.

- Franklin D. Roosevelt

The GOP lost its congressional majorities during the Great Depression (1929–1940) under President Franklin D. Roosevelt, whose popular New Deal programs shifted the country towards the Democratic Party for most of the next three decades.

- Republican Party (United States)

4 related topics with Alpha

Overall

Southern United States

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Geographic and cultural region of the United States of America.

Geographic and cultural region of the United States of America.

Texas Hill Country
Bluegrass region, Kentucky
Glass Mountains, Oklahoma
North Carolina's Appalachian Mountains
Field of yellow wildflowers in Saint Bernard Parish, Louisiana
Pearl River backwater in Mississippi
Misty Bluff along the Buffalo River, Ozark Mountains, Arkansas
Tidal wetlands of the Chesapeake Bay in Maryland
Cherry River in West Virginia
The highlands of Grayson County in Southwest Virginia
1st Maryland Regiment holding the line at the Battle of Guilford Courthouse in North Carolina, 1781
The siege of Yorktown prompted Great Britain's surrender in North America during the American Revolutionary War, 1781
Slaves on a South Carolina plantation (The Old Plantation, circa 1790)
Grove Plantation in Tallahassee, Florida. Known officially as the Call/Collins House at the Grove. Built circa 1840.
Horse race meeting at Jacksonville, Alabama, 1841
Historic Southern United States. The states in light red were considered "border states", and gave varying degrees of support to the Southern cause although they remained in the Union. This illustration depicts the original, trans-Allegheny borders of Virginia, and thus does not show West Virginia (which separated from Virginia in 1863) separately. Although members of the Five Tribes in Indian Territory (today part of Oklahoma) aligned themselves with the Confederacy, the region is not shaded because at the time it was a territory, not a state.
Atlanta's railroad roundhouse in ruins shortly after the end of the Civil War
An African American family, photo-graphed by O'Pierre Havens, circa 1868
A Home on the Mississippi, by Currier and Ives, 1871
Child laborers in Bluffton, South Carolina, 1913
An illustration from Houston: Where Seventeen Railroads Meet the Sea, 1913
Photo of sharecropper family in Walker County, Alabama, circa 1937
Naval Air Station Miami, circa 1942–43
Street musicians in Maynardville, Tennessee, photographed in 1935
Alabama plays Texas in American football for the 2010 BCS National Championship Game
Houston vs Texas face-off during the 2013 Lone Star Series in the American League West division of Major League Baseball
The start of the 2015 Daytona 500, the biggest race in NASCAR, at Daytona International Speedway in Daytona Beach, Florida
A rally against school integration in Little Rock, 1959.
U.S. president Lyndon B. Johnson signs the historic Civil Rights Act of 1964.
Bill Clinton, newly elected Governor of Arkansas speaking with Jimmy Carter in 1978. Carter and Clinton were both Southern Democrats and elected to the presidencies in 1976 and 1992.
Racial segregation was required by state laws in the South and other U.S. states until 1964.
Dallas
Houston
Washington, D.C.
Miami
Atlanta
Tampa
Charlotte
Nashville
Louisville
New Orleans
University of Texas at Austin
Virginia Tech
University of Miami
Rice University

The South usually elects Republicans in most states, but both the Republican and Democratic Party are competitive in certain Southern swing states.

President Franklin D. Roosevelt noted the South as the "number one priority" in terms of need of assistance during the Great Depression.

Portrait by Alexander Gardner, November 1863

Abraham Lincoln

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American lawyer and statesman who served as the 16th president of the United States from 1861 until his assassination in 1865.

American lawyer and statesman who served as the 16th president of the United States from 1861 until his assassination in 1865.

Portrait by Alexander Gardner, November 1863
The farm site where Lincoln grew up in Spencer County, Indiana
Lincoln's home in Springfield, Illinois
Lincoln in his late 30s as a member of the U.S. House of Representatives. Photo taken by one of Lincoln's law students around 1846.
Lincoln in 1857
Lincoln in 1858, the year of his debates with Stephen Douglas over slavery
A portrait of Dred Scott, petitioner in Dred Scott v. Sandford
Abraham Lincoln (1860) by Mathew Brady, taken the day of the Cooper Union speech
A Timothy Cole wood engraving taken from a May 20, 1860, ambrotype of Lincoln, two days following his nomination for president
Headlines on the day of Lincoln's inauguration portended hostilities with the Confederacy, Fort Sumter being attacked less than six weeks later.
March 1861 inaugural at the Capitol building. The dome above the rotunda was still under construction.
Lincoln with officers after the Battle of Antietam. Notable figures (from left) are 1. Col. Delos Sackett; 4. Gen. George W. Morell; 5. Alexander S. Webb, Chief of Staff, V Corps; 6. McClellan;. 8. Dr. Jonathan Letterman; 10. Lincoln; 11. Henry J. Hunt; 12. Fitz John Porter; 15. Andrew A. Humphreys; 16. Capt. George Armstrong Custer.
Running the Machine: An 1864 political cartoon satirizing Lincoln's administration – featuring William Fessenden, Edwin Stanton, William Seward, Gideon Welles, Lincoln, and others
Lincoln and McClellan
Lincoln, absent his usual top hat, is highlighted at Gettysburg.
An electoral landslide for Lincoln (in red) in the 1864 election; southern states (brown) and territories (gray) not in play
A poster of the 1864 election campaign with Lincoln as the candidate for president and Andrew Johnson as the candidate for vice president
Lincoln's second inaugural address in 1865 at the almost completed Capitol building
A political cartoon of Vice President Andrew Johnson (a former tailor) and Lincoln, 1865, entitled The 'Rail Splitter' At Work Repairing the Union. The caption reads (Johnson): "Take it quietly Uncle Abe and I will draw it closer than ever." (Lincoln): "A few more stitches Andy and the good old Union will be mended."
Shown in the presidential booth of Ford's Theatre, from left to right, are assassin John Wilkes Booth, Abraham Lincoln, Mary Todd Lincoln, Clara Harris, and Henry Rathbone.
Funeral of Lincoln
Abraham Lincoln, painting by George Peter Alexander Healy in 1869
Lincoln in February 1865, two months before his death
Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C.
The Lincoln cent, an American coin portraying Lincoln
Lincoln's image carved into the stone of Mount Rushmore|alt=See caption
Abraham Lincoln, a 1909 bronze statue by Adolph Weinman, sits before a historic church in Hodgenville, Kentucky.|alt=See caption
The Lincoln memorial postage stamp of 1866 was issued by the U.S. Post Office exactly one year after Lincoln's death.
Painting of Abraham Lincoln for the U.S. Capitol, by Ned Bittinger

He reentered politics in 1854, becoming a leader in the new Republican Party, and he reached a national audience in the 1858 Senate campaign debates against Stephen Douglas.

Lincoln, a moderate Republican, had to navigate a contentious array of factions with friends and opponents from both the Democratic and Republican parties.

In surveys of U.S. scholars ranking presidents conducted since 1948, the top three presidents are Lincoln, Washington, and Franklin Delano Roosevelt, although the order varies.

Percent of self-identified liberals by state in 2018, according to a Gallup poll:

Modern liberalism in the United States

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Form of social liberalism found in American politics.

Form of social liberalism found in American politics.

Percent of self-identified liberals by state in 2018, according to a Gallup poll:
Bill Clinton and Tony Blair, adherents of the Third Way

Since the 1960s, the Democratic Party has been considered liberal and the Republican Party has been considered conservative.

Modern liberalism took shape during the 20th century, with roots in Theodore Roosevelt's Square Deal and New Nationalism, Woodrow Wilson's New Freedom, Franklin D. Roosevelt's New Deal, Harry S. Truman's Fair Deal, John F. Kennedy's New Frontier and Lyndon B. Johnson's Great Society.

Gallup (company)

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American analytics and advisory company based in Washington, D.C. Founded by George Gallup in 1935, the company became known for its public opinion polls conducted worldwide.

American analytics and advisory company based in Washington, D.C. Founded by George Gallup in 1935, the company became known for its public opinion polls conducted worldwide.

George Gallup (1901-1984), founder of the company in 1935

Gallup also refused to conduct surveys commissioned by organizations such as the Republican and Democratic parties, a position the company has continued to hold.

In 1936, Gallup successfully predicted that Franklin Roosevelt would defeat Alfred Landon for the U.S. presidency in direct contradiction to the popular The Literary Digest; this event popularized the company and made it a leader in American polling.