Abraham Lincoln, 16th president of the United States (1861–1865) and the first Republican to hold the office
Andrew Jackson was the seventh president of the United States (1829–1837) and the first Democratic president.
Charles R. Jennison, an anti-slavery militia leader associated with the Jayhawkers from Kansas and an early Republican politician in the region
Martin Van Buren was the eighth president of the United States (1837–1841) and the second Democratic president.
Ulysses S. Grant, 18th president of the United States (1869–1877)
Senator Stephen A. Douglas
James G. Blaine, 28th & 31st Secretary of State (1881; 1889–1892)
The 1885 inauguration of Grover Cleveland, the only president with non-consecutive terms
William McKinley, 25th president of the United States (1897–1901)
Leaders of the Democratic Party during the first half of the 20th century on 14 June 1913: Secretary of State William J. Bryan, Josephus Daniels, President Woodrow Wilson, Breckinridge Long, William Phillips, and Franklin D. Roosevelt
Theodore Roosevelt, 26th president of the United States (1901–1909)
Franklin D. Roosevelt and Harry S. Truman, 32nd and 33rd presidents of the United States (1933–1945; 1945–1953), featured on a campaign poster for the 1944 presidential election
Herbert Hoover, 31st president of the United States (1929–1933)
John F. Kennedy and Lyndon B. Johnson, 35th and 36th presidents of the United States (1961–1963, 1963–1969)
Ronald Reagan, 40th president of the United States (1981–1989)
Jimmy Carter, 39th president of the United States (1977–1981), delivering the State of the Union Address in 1979
Donald Trump, 45th president of the United States (2017–2021)
Bill Clinton, 42nd president of the United States (1993–2001), at The Pentagon in 1998
Calvin Coolidge, 30th president of the United States (1923–1929)
Barack Obama speaking to College Democrats of America in 2007
Arnold Schwarzenegger, 38th governor of California (2003–2011)
President Barack Obama meeting with the Blue Dog Coalition in the State Dining Room of the White House in 2009
John McCain, United States senator from Arizona (1987–2018)
Eleanor Roosevelt at the 1956 Democratic National Convention in Chicago
Donald Rumsfeld, 21st United States Secretary of Defense (2001–2006)
President Barack Obama signing the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act into law at the White House on March 23, 2010
Colin Powell, 65th United States Secretary of State (2001–2005)
Secretary of State John Kerry addressing delegates at the United Nations before signing the Paris Agreement on April 22, 2016
Newt Gingrich, 50th Speaker of the House of Representatives (1995–1999)
Shirley Chisholm was the first major-party African American candidate to run nationwide primary campaigns.
Annual population growth in the U.S. by county - 2010s
President Lyndon B. Johnson signing the Immigration Act of 1965 as Vice President Hubert Humphrey, Senators Edward M. Kennedy and Robert F. Kennedy and others look on
This map shows the vote in the 2020 presidential election by county.
Then-Senator Barack Obama shaking hands with an American soldier in Basra, Iraq in 2008
Political Spectrum Libertarian Left    Centrist   Right  Authoritarian
President Jimmy Carter and Israeli Prime Minister Menachem Begin in 1978
U.S. opinion on gun control issues is deeply divided along political lines, as shown in this 2021 survey.
Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu meeting with President Barack Obama at Ben Gurion Airport in 2013
Self-identified Democrats (blue) versus self-identified Republicans (red) (January–June 2010 data)
Higher percentages of Democrats than Republicans are members of union households.
Elected at age 33, Jon Ossoff is currently the youngest member of the U.S. Senate.
Hillary Clinton was the first woman to be nominated for president by a major party.
Secretary of Transportation Pete Buttigieg
Vice President Kamala Harris
Julián Castro served as Secretary of Housing and Urban Development.
U.S. Senator Tammy Duckworth
Secretary of the Interior Deb Haaland
Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi
U.S. Senator Kyrsten Sinema
Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer
U.S. opinion on gun control issues is deeply divided along political lines, as shown in this 2021 survey.

Since the mid-1850s, it has been the main political rival of the Democratic Party.

- Republican Party (United States)

Its main political rival has been the Republican Party since the 1850s.

- Democratic Party (United States)

76 related topics with Alpha

Overall

In 1990, Joachim Gauck (who is a former German President, centrist politician and activist without party affiliation) took part in the Alliance 90, having become an independent after its merger with The Greens

Centrism

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Political outlook or position that involves acceptance and/or support of a balance of social equality and a degree of social hierarchy, while opposing political changes which would result in a significant shift of society strongly to either the left or the right.

Political outlook or position that involves acceptance and/or support of a balance of social equality and a degree of social hierarchy, while opposing political changes which would result in a significant shift of society strongly to either the left or the right.

In 1990, Joachim Gauck (who is a former German President, centrist politician and activist without party affiliation) took part in the Alliance 90, having become an independent after its merger with The Greens
Campaign for the Norwegian Centre Party at Nærbø: like its Finnish and Swedish counterparts, the party has a strong focus on decentralisation, rural and agrarian issues

Harry Truman, who served as U.S. president from 1945 until 1953, is regarded as a centrist Democrat, while Dwight Eisenhower, who was the president from 1953 to 1961, is regarded as a centrist Republican.

Gen. Anthony C. Zinni briefs reporters at The Pentagon following Operation Desert Fox, 21 December 1998

2003 invasion of Iraq

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The first stage of the Iraq War.

The first stage of the Iraq War.

Gen. Anthony C. Zinni briefs reporters at The Pentagon following Operation Desert Fox, 21 December 1998
A UN weapons inspector in Iraq, 2002.
Two US F-16 Fighting Falcons prepare to depart Prince Sultan Air Base in Saudi Arabia for a patrol as part of Operation Southern Watch, 2000.
memo
George W. Bush addressed the General Assembly of the United Nations on 12 September 2002 to outline the complaints of the United States government against the Iraqi government.
From left: French President Jacques Chirac, US President George W. Bush, British Prime Minister Tony Blair and Italian Prime minister Silvio Berlusconi at the G8 Summit at Evian, France. Chirac opposed the invasion; the other three leaders supported it.
Anti war protest in London, 2002
60,000–200,000 protesters of various ages demonstrated in San Francisco, 15 February 2003
José Manuel Durão Barroso, Tony Blair, George W. Bush and José María Aznar on 16 March 2003
U.S. President George W. Bush meets with his top advisors on 19 March 2003 just before the invasion
Colin Powell holding a model vial of anthrax while giving presentation to the United Nations Security Council on 5 February 2003 (still photograph captured from video clip, The White House/CNN)
President George Bush, surrounded by leaders of the House and Senate, announces the Joint Resolution to Authorize the Use of United States Armed Forces Against Iraq, 2 October 2002.
President George W. Bush addresses the nation from the Oval Office, 19 March 2003, to announce the beginning of Operation Iraqi Freedom.
Tony Blair (left) and George W. Bush at Camp David in March 2003, during the build-up to the invasion of Iraq
Kurdish areas in Northern Iraq
US Marine M1A1 tank is off-loaded from a US Navy LCAC in Kuwait in February 2003
T-72 Lion of Babylon (Asad Babil)
US invasion: 20–28 March 2003
US invasion: 29 March – 7 April 2003
Routes and major battles fought by invasion force and afterwards
Carrier Air Wing Two (CVW-2) mission briefing aboard USS Constellation (CV-64), 21 March 2003.
Wingtip vortices are visible trailing from an F-15E as it disengages from midair refueling with a KC-10 during Operation Iraqi Freedom
NASA Landsat 7 image of Baghdad, 2 April 2003. The dark streaks are smoke from oil well fires set in an attempt to hinder attacking air forces
A U.S. amphibious fighting vehicle destroyed near Nasiriyah
A U.S. soldier stands guard duty near a burning oil well in the Rumaila oil field, 2 April 2003
Destroyed Iraqi T-72 tank on Highway 9 outside Najaf
British soldiers engage Iraqi Army positions with their 81mm Mortars south of Basra, 26 March 2003.
A T72 Asad Babil abandoned after facing the final U.S. thrust into Baghdad
The northern front during March and April 2003
Aftermath of Battle
Peshmerga, U.S. Special Operations
A squad leader with the 15th Marine Expeditionary Unit (Special Operations Capable) (15th MEU (SOC))
The destroyed remains of Iraqi tanks and other armored vehicles litter an Iraqi military complex west of Diwaniyah
A combat camera video shows the 1 April 2003 footage of PFC Jessica Lynch on a stretcher during her rescue from Iraq.
U.S. Army M1A1 Abrams tanks and their crews pose for a photo in front of the "Victory Arch" monument at Baghdad's Ceremony Square in November 2003.
An American M1 Abrams tank destroyed in Baghdad
Marines from 1st Battalion 7th Marines enter a palace during the Battle of Baghdad
The April 2003 toppling of Saddam Hussein's statue in Firdos Square in Baghdad shortly after the capture of the city
USS Abraham Lincoln returning to port carrying its Mission Accomplished banner
The "Coalition of the willing" named by the US State Department in 2003.
Polish GROM troops pose immediately after the port's capture during the Battle of Umm Qasr.
Aircraft of the USAF 379th Air Expeditionary Wing and UK and Australian counterparts stationed together at Al Udeid Air Base, Qatar, in southwest Asia, fly over the desert on 14 April 2003. Aircraft include KC-135 Stratotanker, F-15E Strike Eagle, F-117 Nighthawk, F-16CJ Falcon, British GR-4 Tornado, and Australian F/A-18 Hornet
A study found that in the lead up to the Iraq War, most U.S. sources were overwhelmingly in favor of the invasion.
Poland was part of the "coalition of the willing"
Members of the RAN Clearance Diving Team Three and an Australian Army LCM-8 inspecting camouflaged mines, 21 March 2003.

The Republican Party's campaign platform in the 2000 election called for "full implementation" of the Iraq Liberation Act as "a starting point" in a plan to "remove" Saddam.

For example, in April 2003 John Kerry, the Democratic candidate in the presidential election, said at a campaign rally: "What we need now is not just a regime change in Saddam Hussein and Iraq, but we need a regime change in the United States."

Ohio

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State in the Midwestern region of the United States.

State in the Midwestern region of the United States.

Artists conception of the Fort Ancient SunWatch Indian Village in Dayton.
Iroquois conquests during the Beaver Wars (mid-1600s), which largely depopulated the upper and mid-Ohio River valley.
The Ohio Country indicating battle sites between American settlers and indigenous tribes, 1775–1794.
Rufus Putnam by James Sharples, Jr., 1797
Battle of Lake Erie by William Henry Powell.
The route of Morgan's Raid.
The first Standard Oil refinery was opened in Cleveland by businessman John D. Rockefeller.
Iron being converted to steel for wartime efforts at Youngstown's Republic Steel in 1941.
Geographic regions of Ohio.
Map of Ohio cities and rivers.
Köppen climate types of Ohio, using 1991-2020 climate normals.
Ohio population density map.
Amish children on their way to school
Cincinnati's Procter & Gamble is one of Ohio's largest companies in terms of revenue.
Cincinnati light rail
The Ohio Statehouse in Columbus, home to the Ohio General Assembly.
The Thomas J. Moyer Ohio Judicial Center holds the Supreme Court of Ohio.
Presidential election results by county for 2020
University Hall at the Ohio State University in Columbus.
Bosworth Hall at Oberlin College in northeast Ohio.
Springer Auditorium at the Cincinnati Music Hall.
Progressive Field, home to the Cleveland Guardians baseball team
Ohio Stadium in Columbus, home to the Ohio State Buckeyes football team, is the fifth largest stadium in the world.
Population growth by county in Ohio between the 2010 and 2020 censuses. -10 to -5 percent
-5 to -2 percent
-2 to 0 percent
0 to 2 percent
2 to 5 percent
5 to 10 percent
10 to 20 percent
More than 20 percent

The current governor is Mike DeWine since 2019, a member of the Republican Party.

Ohio is considered a swing state, being won by either the Democratic or Republican candidates reasonably each election.

5 May 1789 opening of the Estates General of 1789 in Versailles, as the conservatives sat on the right

Right-wing politics

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Right-wing politics are generally characterized by support for the view that certain social orders and hierarchies are inevitable, natural, normal, or desirable, typically supporting this position on the basis of natural law, economics, authority or tradition.

Right-wing politics are generally characterized by support for the view that certain social orders and hierarchies are inevitable, natural, normal, or desirable, typically supporting this position on the basis of natural law, economics, authority or tradition.

5 May 1789 opening of the Estates General of 1789 in Versailles, as the conservatives sat on the right
1909 Conservative Party poster.
First edition of Manifest der Kommunistischen Partei, or Manifesto of the Communist Party, printed in England, 1848
A Carlist flag
On January 5, 1895, Captain Alfred Dreyfus was cashiered.
Tea Party protesters walk towards the United States Capitol during the Taxpayer March on Washington, 12 September 2009.
Maharajadhiraja Prithvi Narayan Shah (1723-1775), King of Nepal, propagated the ideals of the Hindu text the Dharmasastra as his kingdom's ruling ideology
Russell Kirk, 1963

The term family values has been used by right-wing parties—such as the Republican Party in the United States, the Family First Party in Australia, the Conservative Party in the United Kingdom, and the Bharatiya Janata Party in India—to signify support for traditional families and opposition to the changes the modern world has made in how families live.

In the United States, following the Second World War, social conservatives joined with right-wing elements of the Republican Party to gain support in traditionally Democratic voting populations like white southerners and Catholics.

Louisiana

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State in the Deep South and South Central regions of the United States.

State in the Deep South and South Central regions of the United States.

Louisiana entrance sign off Interstate 20 in Madison Parish east of Tallulah
Watson Brake, the oldest mound complex in North America
Poverty Point UNESCO site
Troyville Earthworks, once the second tallest earthworks in North America
French Acadians, who came to be known as Cajuns, settled in southern Louisiana, especially along the banks of its major bayous.
Map of New France (blue color) in 1750, before the French and Indian War
Free woman of color with mixed-race daughter; late 18th-century collage painting, New Orleans
Saint Dominican Creoles
French pirate Jean Lafitte, who operated in New Orleans, was born in Port-au-Prince around 1782.
Map of Louisiana in 1800
Louisiana Purchase, 1803
'Signing the Ordinance of Secession of Louisiana, January 26, 1861', oil on canvas painting, 1861
Capture of New Orleans, April 1862, colored lithograph of engraving
A young African American man in Morganza, 1938
National Rice Festival, Crowley, Louisiana, 1938
View of flooded New Orleans in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina
Map of Louisiana
Aerial view of Louisiana's wetland habitats
A field of yellow wildflowers in St. Bernard Parish
Honey Island Swamp
Entrance to the Bald Eagle Nest Trail at South Toledo Bend State Park
Bogue Chitto State Park
Geographic map of Louisiana
Population density and low elevation coastal zones in the Mississippi River Delta. The Mississippi River Delta is especially vulnerable to sea level rise.
Louisiana's population density
Cathedral Basilica of St. Louis in New Orleans
Cargo ship at the Port of New Orleans
Tabasco varieties produced in Louisiana
Typical dishes of Louisiana Creole cuisine
El Museo de los Isleños (Isleño Museum) in Saint Bernard
The languages of historic Native American tribes who inhabited what is now Louisiana include: Tunica, Caddo, Natchez, Choctaw, Atakapa, Chitimacha and Houma.
Louisiana's bilingual state welcome sign, recognizing its French heritage
Aerial view of Louisiana State University's flagship campus
A streetcar on the St. Charles Avenue Line in New Orleans
Gulf Intracoastal Waterway near New Orleans
The Louisiana State Capitol in Baton Rouge, the tallest state capitol building in the United States
The Louisiana Governor's Mansion
Treemap of the popular vote by parish, 2016 presidential election
Mardi Gras celebrations in the Spanish Town section of Baton Rouge
Caesars Superdome and Smoothie King Center in New Orleans.

From 1824 to 1861, Louisiana moved from a political system based on personality and ethnicity to a distinct two-party system, with Democrats competing first against Whigs, then Know Nothings, and finally only other Democrats.

Prominent Jews in Louisiana's political leadership have included Whig (later Democrat) Judah P. Benjamin (1811–1884), who represented Louisiana in the U.S. Senate before the American Civil War and then became the Confederate secretary of state; Democrat-turned-Republican Michael Hahn who was elected as governor, serving 1864–1865 when Louisiana was occupied by the Union Army, and later elected in 1884 as a U.S. congressman; Democrat Adolph Meyer (1842–1908), Confederate Army officer who represented the state in the U.S. House of Representatives from 1891 until his death in 1908; Republican secretary of state Jay Dardenne (1954–), and Republican (Democrat before 2011) attorney general Buddy Caldwell (1946–).

Control of the Senate, Presidency, and House since 1855: any column where all three sections show the same color is a trifecta.

Government trifecta

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Political situation in which the same political party controls the executive branch and both chambers of the legislative branch in countries that have a bicameral legislature and an executive that is not fused.

Political situation in which the same political party controls the executive branch and both chambers of the legislative branch in countries that have a bicameral legislature and an executive that is not fused.

Control of the Senate, Presidency, and House since 1855: any column where all three sections show the same color is a trifecta.

The most recent federal trifecta is currently held by the Democratic Party since 2021, and the last one before that was by the Republican Party from 2017 to 2019.

Garment workers on strike, New York City circa 1913

Trade union

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Organization of workers intent on "maintaining or improving the conditions of their employment", such as attaining better wages and benefits (such as holiday, health care, and retirement), improving working conditions, improving safety standards, establishing complaint procedures, developing rules governing status of employees (rules governing promotions, just-cause-conditions for termination) and protecting the integrity of their trade through the increased bargaining power wielded by solidarity among workers.

Organization of workers intent on "maintaining or improving the conditions of their employment", such as attaining better wages and benefits (such as holiday, health care, and retirement), improving working conditions, improving safety standards, establishing complaint procedures, developing rules governing status of employees (rules governing promotions, just-cause-conditions for termination) and protecting the integrity of their trade through the increased bargaining power wielded by solidarity among workers.

Garment workers on strike, New York City circa 1913
Early 19th century workplace militancy manifested in the Luddite riots, when unemployed workers destroyed labour saving machines.
Poster issued by the London Trades Council, advertising a demonstration held on 2 June 1873
Trade union demonstrators held at bay by soldiers during the 1912 Lawrence textile strike in Lawrence, Massachusetts
Eight-hour day march circa 1900, outside Parliament House in Spring Street, Melbourne
Costa Rican agricultural unions demonstration, January 2011
2011 National Trade Union Council (Zenrokyo) May Day march, Tokyo
Workers on strike in Oslo, Norway, 2012
Public sector workers in Leeds striking over pension changes by the government in November 2011
Child labourers in an Indiana glass works. Labor unions have an objective interest in combating child labour.
Cesar Chavez speaking at a 1974 United Farm Workers rally in Delano, California. The UFW during Chavez's tenure was committed to restricting immigration.
The Great Southwest Railroad Strike of 1886 was a trade union strike involving more than 200,000 workers.
A rally of the trade union UNISON in Oxford during a strike on 28 March 2006
World map with countries shaded according to their trade union density rate with statistics provided by the International Labour Organization Department of Statistics
90.0–99.%
80.0–89.%
70.0–79.%
60.0–69.%
50.0–59.%
40.0–49.%
30.0–39.%
20.0–29.%
10.0–19.%
0.0–9.%
No data

In the United States, trade unions are almost always aligned with the Democratic Party with a few exceptions.

For example, the International Brotherhood of Teamsters has supported Republican Party candidates on a number of occasions and the Professional Air Traffic Controllers Organization (PATCO) endorsed Ronald Reagan in 1980.

Photograph of Nast by Napoleon Sarony, taken in Union Square, New York City

Thomas Nast

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German-born American caricaturist and editorial cartoonist often considered to be the "Father of the American Cartoon".

German-born American caricaturist and editorial cartoonist often considered to be the "Father of the American Cartoon".

Photograph of Nast by Napoleon Sarony, taken in Union Square, New York City
Thomas Nast self-caricature
Self-caricature of Thomas Nast
The American River Ganges, a cartoon by Thomas Nast showing bishops attacking public schools, with connivance of "Boss" Tweed. Harper's Weekly, September 30, 1871.
Thomas Nast cartoon Schurz, Belmont, Fenton, Trumbull, Tipton, and others lie before a vengeful Columbia (representing the U.S.) while Uncle Sam (also representing the U.S.) waves his hat beside the victorious Ulysses S. Grant, 1872
The 1876 cartoon that helped identify Boss Tweed in Spain
Portrait of Thomas Nast from Harper's Weekly, 1867
Nast's Santa Claus on the cover of the January 3, 1863, issue of Harper's Weekly
Thomas Nast asks pardon for his sketches.
September 1868 Nast cartoon "This is a White Man's Government!" depicting left to right a stereotyped Irishman (representing a Northern Democratic party member), an ex-Confederate soldier (Nathan B. Forrest, representing a Southern Democratic party member), and Democratic party chairman August Belmont "triumphing" over a prostrate USCT soldier
thumb|The Usual Irish Way of Doing Things, a Nast cartoon depicting a drunken Irishman lighting a powder keg. Published in Harper's Weekly, September 2, 1871
1879 Nast cartoon: "Red gentleman (Indian) to yellow gentleman (Chinese) "Pale face 'fraid you crowd him out, as he did me." In the left background an African American remarks "My day is coming".
Nast's cartoon "Third Term Panic". Inspired by the tale of The Ass in the Lion's Skin and a rumor of President Grant seeking a third term, the Democratic donkey (labeled "Caesarism") panics the other political animals, including a Republican Party elephant.
October 26, 1874, Nast cartoon "The Union as it was...This is a White Mans Government....the Lost cause...Worse than Slavery"
"Colored Rule in a Reconstructed(?) State", Harper's Weekly, March 14, 1874. By this point, Nast had given up on racial idealism and caricatured black legislators as incompetent buffoons.

He was a critic of Democratic Representative "Boss" Tweed and the Tammany Hall Democratic party political machine.

Republican Party elephant

Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (Medicaid administrator) logo

Medicaid

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Federal and state program that helps with healthcare costs for some people with limited income and resources.

Federal and state program that helps with healthcare costs for some people with limited income and resources.

Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (Medicaid administrator) logo
States that expanded Medicaid under ACA had a lower uninsured rate in 2018 at various income levels.
603x603px
Medicaid expansion by state, as of October 8, 2021 
Adopted the Medicaid expansion
Medicaid expansion under discussion
Not adopting Medicaid expansion

Lukens' study supported the generalized hypothesis that Democrats favor generous eligibility policies while Republicans do not.

TheCall rally in 2008, Washington, D.C., with the United States Capitol in the background

Evangelicalism in the United States

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Movement among Protestant Christians who believe in the necessity of being born again, emphasize the importance of evangelism, and affirm traditional Protestant teachings on the authority as well as the historicity of the Bible.

Movement among Protestant Christians who believe in the necessity of being born again, emphasize the importance of evangelism, and affirm traditional Protestant teachings on the authority as well as the historicity of the Bible.

TheCall rally in 2008, Washington, D.C., with the United States Capitol in the background
National Association of Evangelicals works to foster cooperation among U.S. evangelical churches
Jonathan Edwards was the most influential evangelical theologian in America during the 18th century
Depiction of a camp meeting
Charles Grandison Finney, the most prominent revivalist of the Second Great Awakening
Collection box for the Massachusetts Anti-Slavery Society, circa 1850.
John Nelson Darby, considered to be the father of modern Dispensationalism
Dwight Moody, founder of the Moody Bible Institute
Cyrus Scofield, author of the Scofield Reference Bible
Scofield Bible, 1917 edition
Congregation at Angelus Temple during 14-hour Holy Ghost service led by Aimee Semple McPherson in Los Angeles, California in 1942.
Services at the Pentecostal Church of God in Lejunior, Kentucky, 1946
Mushroom cloud from the Trinity test, the first test of a nuclear bomb
Evangelical revivalist Billy Graham in Duisburg, Germany, 1954
Socially conservative evangelical Protestantism has a major cultural influence in the Bible Belt, an area that covers almost all of the Southern United States, and includes all of the states that fought against the Union in the American Civil War.
An event at Texas megachurch Gateway Church's 114 Southlake Campus
Jerry Falwell, founder of the Moral Majority
Average surface air temperatures from 2011 to 2021 compared to the 1956–1976 average

As a reaction to the 1960s counterculture, many evangelicals became politically active and involved in the Christian right, which became an important voting bloc of the Republican Party.

When analyzing political trends, pollsters often distinguish between white evangelicals (who tend to vote for the Republican Party) and African American Protestants (who share beliefs in common with white evangelicals but tend to vote for the Democratic Party).