Democratic Party (United States)

Andrew Jackson was the seventh president of the United States (1829–1837) and the first Democratic president.
Martin Van Buren was the eighth president of the United States (1837–1841) and the second Democratic president.
Senator Stephen A. Douglas
The 1885 inauguration of Grover Cleveland, the only president with non-consecutive terms
Leaders of the Democratic Party during the first half of the 20th century on 14 June 1913: Secretary of State William J. Bryan, Josephus Daniels, President Woodrow Wilson, Breckinridge Long, William Phillips, and Franklin D. Roosevelt
Franklin D. Roosevelt and Harry S. Truman, 32nd and 33rd presidents of the United States (1933–1945; 1945–1953), featured on a campaign poster for the 1944 presidential election
John F. Kennedy and Lyndon B. Johnson, 35th and 36th presidents of the United States (1961–1963, 1963–1969)
Jimmy Carter, 39th president of the United States (1977–1981), delivering the State of the Union Address in 1979
Bill Clinton, 42nd president of the United States (1993–2001), at The Pentagon in 1998
Barack Obama speaking to College Democrats of America in 2007
President Barack Obama meeting with the Blue Dog Coalition in the State Dining Room of the White House in 2009
Eleanor Roosevelt at the 1956 Democratic National Convention in Chicago
President Barack Obama signing the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act into law at the White House on March 23, 2010
Secretary of State John Kerry addressing delegates at the United Nations before signing the Paris Agreement on April 22, 2016
Shirley Chisholm was the first major-party African American candidate to run nationwide primary campaigns.
President Lyndon B. Johnson signing the Immigration Act of 1965 as Vice President Hubert Humphrey, Senators Edward M. Kennedy and Robert F. Kennedy and others look on
Then-Senator Barack Obama shaking hands with an American soldier in Basra, Iraq in 2008
President Jimmy Carter and Israeli Prime Minister Menachem Begin in 1978
Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu meeting with President Barack Obama at Ben Gurion Airport in 2013
Self-identified Democrats (blue) versus self-identified Republicans (red) (January–June 2010 data)
Higher percentages of Democrats than Republicans are members of union households.
Elected at age 33, Jon Ossoff is currently the youngest member of the U.S. Senate.
Hillary Clinton was the first woman to be nominated for president by a major party.
Secretary of Transportation Pete Buttigieg
Vice President Kamala Harris
Julián Castro served as Secretary of Housing and Urban Development.
U.S. Senator Tammy Duckworth
Secretary of the Interior Deb Haaland
Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi
U.S. Senator Kyrsten Sinema
Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer
U.S. opinion on gun control issues is deeply divided along political lines, as shown in this 2021 survey.

One of the two major contemporary political parties in the United States.

- Democratic Party (United States)

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Official portrait, 2021

Joe Biden

American politician who is the 46th and current president of the United States.

American politician who is the 46th and current president of the United States.

Official portrait, 2021
Biden at Archmere Academy in the 1950s
Biden in the Syracuse 1968 yearbook
Results of the 1972 U.S. Senate election in Delaware
Biden and his second wife, Jill, met in 1975 and married in 1977
Biden with President Jimmy Carter, 1979
Biden shaking hands with President Ronald Reagan, 1984
Biden speaking at the signing of the 1994 Crime Bill with President Bill Clinton in 1994
Senator Biden accompanies President Clinton and other officials to Bosnia and Herzegovina, December 1997
Biden addresses the press after meeting with Prime Minister Ayad Allawi in Baghdad in 2004.
Biden at the White House in 1987
Biden campaigns at a house party in Creston, Iowa, July 2007
Biden speaks at the August 23, 2008, vice presidential announcement at the Old State Capitol in Springfield, Illinois
Biden being sworn in as vice president on January 20, 2009
President Obama congratulates Biden for his role in shaping the debt ceiling deal which led to the Budget Control Act of 2011.
Biden during a visit to Baghdad
Biden, Obama and the national security team gathered in the White House Situation Room to monitor the progress of the May 2011 mission to kill Osama bin Laden
Biden and Obama, July 2012
Official vice president portrait, 2013
Biden with Israeli prime minister Benjamin Netanyahu in Jerusalem, March 9, 2016
Biden with Vice President-elect Mike Pence on November 10, 2016
Biden with Barack Obama and Donald Trump, at the latter's inauguration on January 20, 2017
Biden at his presidential kickoff rally in Philadelphia, May 2019
Biden takes the oath of office administered by Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. at the Capitol, January 20, 2021
Biden with his Cabinet, July 2021
Biden meeting with Secretary General of NATO Jens Stoltenberg in the Oval Office, June 7, 2021
Biden in a video conference with Vice President Harris and the U.S. National Security team, discussing the Fall of Kabul on August 15, 2021
Percent change from a year earlier
Biden, UK prime minister Boris Johnson and UN secretary-general António Guterres at the opening ceremony of the COP26 climate summit in Glasgow on November 1, 2021
Biden with Ketanji Brown Jackson in the Oval Office
Biden with refugees from Ukraine in Warsaw, March 2022
President Barack Obama and Biden talk with Xi Jinping, February 14, 2012
President Obama presents Biden with the Presidential Medal of Freedom with Distinction, January 12, 2017

A member of the Democratic Party, he previously served as the 47th vice president from 2009 to 2017 under Barack Obama and represented Delaware in the United States Senate from 1973 to 2009.

Vice President of the United States

Second-highest officer in the executive branch of the U.S. federal government, after the president of the United States, and ranks first in the presidential line of succession.

Second-highest officer in the executive branch of the U.S. federal government, after the president of the United States, and ranks first in the presidential line of succession.

John Adams, the first vice president of the United States
Though prominent as a Missouri Senator, Harry Truman had been vice president only three months when he became president; he was never informed of Franklin Roosevelt's war or postwar policies while vice president.
1888 illustration of John Tyler receiving the news of President William Henry Harrison's death from Chief Clerk of the State Department Fletcher Webster
Then-Vice President Joe Biden meets with President Barack Obama in the Oval Office, 2010
Geraldine Ferraro speaks at the 1984 Democratic National Convention following her selection as the party's vice presidential nominee
Map of the United States showing the number of electoral votes allocated following the 2010 census to each state and the District of Columbia for the 2012, 2016 and 2020 presidential elections; it also notes that Maine and Nebraska distribute electors by way of the Congressional District Method. 270 electoral votes are required for a majority out of 538 votes possible.
Four vice presidents: (from left) outgoing president Lyndon B. Johnson (the 37th vice president), incoming president Richard Nixon (36th), (Everett Dirksen administering oath), incoming vice president Spiro Agnew (39th), and outgoing vice president Hubert Humphrey (38th), January 20, 1969
(Left to right) President Richard Nixon, First Lady Pat Nixon, Betty Ford and Congressman Gerald Ford after President Nixon nominated Congressman Ford to be vice president, October 13, 1973
{{center|Dan Quayle (1989–1993) Age {{age|1947|2|4}}}}
{{center|Al Gore (1993–2001) Age {{age|1948|3|31}}}}
{{center|Dick Cheney (2001–2009) Age {{age|1941|1|30}}}}
{{center|Joe Biden (2009–2017) Age {{age|1942|11|20}}}}
{{center|Mike Pence (2017–2021) Age {{age|1959|6|7}}}}

The most recent presidential nominee not to name a vice presidential choice, leaving the matter up to the convention, was Democrat Adlai Stevenson in 1956.

Representation of all political parties as percentage in House of Representatives over time

United States House of Representatives

Lower house of the United States Congress, with the Senate being the upper house.

Lower house of the United States Congress, with the Senate being the upper house.

Representation of all political parties as percentage in House of Representatives over time
Historical graph of party control of the Senate and House as well as the presidency
Republican speaker of the House Thomas Brackett Reed (1895–1899)
All 435 voting seats of the current House shown grouped by state, largest to smallest (From 2015)
Population per U.S. representative allocated to each of the 50 states and D.C., ranked by population. Since D.C. (ranked 49th) receives no voting seats in the House, its bar is absent.

For example, Democratic House speaker Nancy Pelosi, who represents California's 12th congressional district within San Francisco, may be identified as "D–California," "D–California–12" or "D–San Francisco."

Oval Office photo, 1964

Lyndon B. Johnson

American politician who served as the 36th president of the United States from 1963 to 1969.

American politician who served as the 36th president of the United States from 1963 to 1969.

Oval Office photo, 1964
Seven-year-old Johnson with his trademark cowboy hat, c. 1915.
Johnson's boyhood home in Johnson City, Texas
President Franklin D. Roosevelt, Governor James V. Allred of Texas, and Johnson, 1937. Johnson later used an edited version of this photo, with Allred airbrushed out, in his 1941 senatorial campaign.
LCDR Johnson, March 1942
Johnson as U.S. senator from Texas
Senate Desk X, used by all Democratic leaders, including Johnson, since Joseph Taylor Robinson
Johnson giving "The Treatment" to Senator Richard Russell in 1963, shortly after becoming president.
President Kennedy and Vice President Johnson outside the White House prior to a ceremony
Vice President Johnson and Attorney General Robert Kennedy meeting with civil rights leaders at the White House on June 22, 1963.
Opening Day of the 1961 baseball season. President Kennedy throws out the first ball at Griffith Stadium, the home field of the Washington Senators, as LBJ and Hubert Humphrey look on.
Vice President Johnson visiting Finland in September 1963; here seen with Mrs. Johnson, while Urho Kekkonen, the President of Finland, welcomes them.
LBJ is sworn in on Air Force One by Judge Sarah Hughes as Mrs. Johnson and Mrs. Kennedy look on.
Meeting with civil rights leaders Martin Luther King Jr. (left), Whitney Young, and James Farmer in the Oval Office in 1964
President Lyndon Johnson (left), alongside Illinois AFL-CIO President Reuben Soderstrom (center) and Vice President Stanley Johnson (right), speaks to the delegates of the 1964 Illinois AFL-CIO convention.
1964 presidential election results
President Lyndon B. Johnson, Martin Luther King Jr., and Rosa Parks at the signing of the Voting Rights Act on August 6, 1965
President Johnson signs the Immigration and Nationality Act of 1965 as Sen. Edward Kennedy, Sen. Robert Kennedy, and others look on
Former president Truman and wife Bess at Medicare Bill signing in 1965, as Lady Bird and Hubert Humphrey look on
Former President Lyndon B. Johnson (center left) and Vice President Spiro Agnew (center right) witness the liftoff of Apollo 11.
Aftermath from a race riot in Washington D.C., April 1968
Lady Bird Johnson and LBJ with Ferdinand and Imelda Marcos on September 12, 1966
Shah of Iran Mohammad Reza Pahlavi and Queen Farah Pahlavi with the Johnsons on their visit to the United States
Secretary of Defense Robert McNamara and General Westmoreland in Vietnam 1965
Awarding a medal to a U.S. soldier during a visit to Vietnam in 1966
Philippines President Marcos hosting the leaders of SEATO nations during the Manila Conference on the Vietnam War
Johnson greeting a crowd, 1966
Johnson talking with his Secretary of Defense Robert McNamara, 1967
Vietnam War protestors march at the Pentagon in Washington, D.C. on October 21, 1967. Support for the war was dropping and the anti-Vietnam War movement strengthened.
Walt Whitman Rostow shows President Lyndon B. Johnson a model of the Khe Sanh area in February 1968
Tens of thousands of civilians were killed during the American bombing of North Vietnam in Operation Rolling Thunder.
Soviet Premier Alexei Kosygin (left) next to Johnson during the Glassboro Summit Conference
Countries visited by Johnson during his presidency
President Johnson meets with Republican candidate Richard Nixon in the White House, July 1968.
Johnson in the Oval Office in 1969, a few days before Richard Nixon's inauguration
With the appointment of Thurgood Marshall, Johnson placed the first African American on the Supreme Court.
Johnson with longer hair during an interview in August 1972, five months before his death
Johnson wearing a cowboy hat at his ranch in Texas, 1972
Johnson's grave
Johnson lying in state in the United States Capitol rotunda
Johnson's image as it appears in the National Portrait Gallery in Washington, D.C.
Johnson with his family in the Yellow Oval Room, Christmas 1968
Front view of the Lyndon Baines Johnson Library and Museum located on the campus of the University of Texas in Austin, Texas
Entrance to the Lyndon Baines Johnson Memorial Grove on the Potomac

A Democrat from Texas, Johnson also served as a U.S. representative, U.S. senator and the Senate's majority leader.

Official portrait, 2017

Donald Trump

American politician, media personality, and businessman who served as the 45th president of the United States from 2017 to 2021.

American politician, media personality, and businessman who served as the 45th president of the United States from 2017 to 2021.

Official portrait, 2017
Trump at the New York Military Academy in 1964
Trump (far right) and wife Ivana in the receiving line of a state dinner for King Fahd of Saudi Arabia in 1985, with U.S. president Ronald Reagan and First Lady Nancy Reagan
Trump Tower in Midtown Manhattan
Entrance of the Trump Taj Mahal in Atlantic City
Trump and New Jersey Generals quarterback Doug Flutie at a 1985 press conference in the lobby of Trump Tower
Trump's star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame
Trump at a New York Mets baseball game in 2009
Trump and President Bill Clinton in June 2000
Trump speaking at CPAC 2011
Trump campaigning in Arizona, March 2016.
2016 electoral vote results. Trump won 304–227
Women's March in Washington on January 21, 2017
Trump is sworn in as president by Chief Justice John Roberts
Trump speaks to automobile workers in Michigan, March 2017
Trump and group of officials and advisors on the way from White House complex to St. John's Church
Trump examines border wall prototypes in Otay Mesa, California.
Trump with the other G7 leaders at the 45th summit in France, 2019
Trump and Xi Jinping at 2018 G20 Summit.
Trump, King Salman of Saudi Arabia, and Egyptian president Abdel Fattah el-Sisi at the 2017 Riyadh summit in Saudi Arabia
U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo meeting with Taliban delegation in Qatar in September 2020
Trump meets Kim Jong-un at the Singapore summit, June 2018
Putin and Trump shaking hands at the G20 Osaka summit, June 2019
Trump and his third Supreme Court nominee, Amy Coney Barrett.
Trump conducts a COVID-19 press briefing with members of the White House Coronavirus Task Force on March 15, 2020
Poland's president Andrzej Duda visited the White House on June 24, 2020, the first foreign leader to do so since the start of the pandemic.
Trump boards helicopter for COVID-19 treatment on October 2, 2020
Trump discharged on October 5, 2020, from Walter Reed National Military Medical Center
Members of House of Representatives vote on two articles of impeachment, December 18, 2019
Trump displaying the front page of The Washington Post reporting his acquittal by the Senate
Trump at a 2020 campaign rally in Arizona
2020 Electoral College results, Trump lost 232–306
Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi signing the second impeachment of Trump
Trump speaks at the "Rally to Protect Our Elections" in Phoenix, Arizona, July 2021.
Trump talking to the press, March 2017
Fact-checkers from The Washington Post, the Toronto Star, and CNN compiled data on "false or misleading claims" (orange background), and "false claims" (violet foreground), respectively.

He won the 2016 United States presidential election as the Republican nominee against Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton but lost the popular vote, becoming the first U.S. president with no prior military or government service.

Supreme Court of the United States

Highest court in the federal judiciary of the United States.

Highest court in the federal judiciary of the United States.

The Court lacked its own building until 1935; from 1791 to 1801, it met in Philadelphia's City Hall.
The Royal Exchange, New York City, the first meeting place of the Supreme Court
Chief Justice Marshall (1801–1835)
The U.S. Supreme Court Building, current home of the Supreme Court, which opened in 1935.
The Hughes Court in 1937, photographed by Erich Salomon. Members include Chief Justice Charles Evans Hughes (center), Louis Brandeis, Benjamin N. Cardozo, Harlan Stone, Owen Roberts, and the "Four Horsemen" Pierce Butler, James Clark McReynolds, George Sutherland, and Willis Van Devanter, who opposed New Deal policies.
Justices of the Supreme Court with President George W. Bush (center-right) in October 2005. The justices (left to right) are: Ruth Bader Ginsburg, David Souter, Antonin Scalia, John Paul Stevens, John Roberts, Sandra Day O'Connor, Anthony Kennedy, Clarence Thomas, and Stephen Breyer
John Roberts giving testimony before the Senate Judiciary Committee during the 2005 hearings on his nomination to be chief justice
Ruth Bader Ginsburg giving testimony before the Senate Judiciary Committee during the 1993 hearings on her nomination to be an associate justice
The interior of the United States Supreme Court
The first four female justices: O'Connor, Sotomayor, Ginsburg, and Kagan.
The current Roberts Court justices (since October 2020): Front row (left to right): Samuel Alito, Clarence Thomas, Chief Justice John Roberts, Stephen Breyer, and Sonia Sotomayor. Back row (left to right): Brett Kavanaugh, Elena Kagan, Neil Gorsuch, and Amy Coney Barrett.
Percentage of cases decided unanimously and by a one-vote margin from 1971 to 2016
The present U.S. Supreme Court building as viewed from the front
From the 1860s until the 1930s, the court sat in the Old Senate Chamber of the U.S. Capitol.
Seth P. Waxman at oral argument presents his case and answers questions from the justices.
Inscription on the wall of the Supreme Court Building from Marbury v. Madison, in which Chief Justice John Marshall outlined the concept of judicial review

The plan, usually called the "court-packing plan", failed in Congress after members of Roosevelt's own Democratic Party believed it to be unconstitutional.

Official portrait, 1989

George H. W. Bush

American politician, diplomat, and businessman who served as the 41st president of the United States from 1989 to 1993.

American politician, diplomat, and businessman who served as the 41st president of the United States from 1989 to 1993.

Official portrait, 1989
George H. W. Bush at his grandfather's house in Kennebunkport, c. 1925
Bush in his Grumman TBF Avenger aboard USS San Jacinto in 1944
Bush in Phillips Academy's 1942 yearbook
Bush, top right, stood with his wife and children, mid-1960s
Former president Dwight D. Eisenhower with Bush
Bush in 1969
Bush greeting then California Governor Ronald Reagan in 1967
Bush as ambassador to the United Nations, 1971
Bush as U.S. Liaison to China, c. 1975
Bush, as CIA Director, listens at a meeting following the assassinations in Beirut of Francis E. Meloy Jr. and Robert O. Waring, 1976
1980 campaign logo
Ronald Reagan, moderator Jon Breen, and Bush participate in the Nashua, New Hampshire, presidential debate, 1980
The Reagan–Bush ticket won the 1980 presidential election with 50.7% of the popular vote and a large majority of the electoral vote
Official portrait of Vice President Bush, 1981
President Ronald Reagan with Bush
Reagan and Bush in a meeting to discuss the United States' invasion of Grenada with a group of bipartisan members of Congress in October 1983
Vice President Bush standing with President Ronald Reagan and Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev on the New York City waterfront in 1988
1988 campaign logo
John Ashcroft and Vice President Bush campaign in St. Louis, Missouri, 1988
Bush won the 1988 presidential election with 53.4% of the popular vote and a large majority of the electoral vote
Chief Justice William Rehnquist administers the Presidential Oath of Office to George H. W. Bush
Map showing the division of East and West Germany until 1990, with Berlin in yellow
Bush and Mikhail Gorbachev at the Helsinki Summit in 1990
In 1991, the Soviet Union dissolved into fifteen independent republics, including Russia (labeled 11)
Iraq (green) invaded Kuwait (orange) in 1990
Bush meets with Robert Gates, General Colin Powell, Secretary Dick Cheney and others about the situation in the Persian Gulf, 1991
From left to right: (standing) President Carlos Salinas, President Bush, Prime Minister Brian Mulroney; (seated) Jaime Serra Puche, Carla Hills, and Michael Wilson at the NAFTA Initialing Ceremony, October 1992
Bush appointed Clarence Thomas to the Supreme Court in 1991
Bush's approval ratings (red) compared to his disapproval ratings (blue) during his presidency
Bush was defeated in the 1992 presidential election by Bill Clinton
President Bill Clinton meeting with former presidents George H. W. Bush and Jimmy Carter at the White House in September 1993
George and Barbara Bush, 2001
From left to right: George H. W. Bush, Barack Obama, George W. Bush, Bill Clinton, and Jimmy Carter
Members of the public pay their respects at the casket of George H. W. Bush lying in state in the Rotunda of the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C.
Bush visits NAS JRB during Hurricane Katrina relief efforts, 2005
The George H.W. Bush Presidential Library and Museum on the west campus of Texas A&M University in College Station, Texas, 2011

By the early 1960s, Bush was widely regarded as an appealing political candidate, and some leading Democrats attempted to convince Bush to become a Democrat.

Official portrait, 1977

Jimmy Carter

American former politician who served as the 39th president of the United States from 1977 to 1981.

American former politician who served as the 39th president of the United States from 1977 to 1981.

Official portrait, 1977
The Carter family store (part of Carter's Boyhood Farm) in Plains, Georgia
Carter with Rosalynn Smith and his mother at his graduation from the U.S. Naval Academy on June 5, 1946
President Jimmy Carter, his wife and Admiral Hyman G. Rickover, USN (wearing tie) aboard the submarine USS Los Angeles (SSN-688) in 1977
Results of the 1970 gubernatorial election in Georgia, with blue counties supporting Carter and red ones voting for Hal Suit: the relative darkness of the shade shows greater support for a candidate.
Carter's official portrait as Governor of Georgia
Jimmy Carter's campaign button announcing his campaign with the slogan, "My name is Jimmy Carter, and I'm running for President."
Carter and President Gerald Ford debating at the Walnut Street Theatre in Philadelphia
The electoral map of the 1976 election
Image of President Carter displayed in the National Portrait Gallery, Washington DC. Portrait by Robert Templeton.
Newly elected governor of Arkansas and future president Bill Clinton meets with President Carter in 1978.
Carter signing the Airline Deregulation Act, 1978
Anwar Sadat, Jimmy Carter and Menachem Begin meet on the Aspen Lodge patio of Camp David on September 6, 1978.
First Lady Rosalynn Carter, Tanzanian leader Julius Nyerere, and Carter, 1977
Carter with Nigerian leader Olusegun Obasanjo on April 1, 1978
Deng Xiaoping with President Carter
Carter with King Hussein of Jordan and Shah of Iran in 1977
Carter and Leonid Brezhnev signing the SALT II treaty at the Hofburg Palace in Vienna, June 18, 1979
Carter, Israeli Prime Minister Menachem Begin and Zbigniew Brzezinski in September 1978
King Khalid of Saudi Arabia and Carter, October 1978
Countries visited by Carter during his presidency
Electoral map of the 1980 election
Carter at a rally in Granite City.
Carter (third from left) with Martti Ahtisaari, William Hague, and Lakhdar Brahimi from The Elders group in London, July 24, 2013.
Carter in 1988
The state funeral of George H. W. Bush in December 2018. Carter and his wife Rosalynn can be seen on the far right of the photograph.
Carter with Justice Harry Blackmun, known for his Roe v. Wade majority opinion authorship
Farah Pahlavi, Empress of Iran, holds Jimmy Carter IV while Rosalynn Carter, Caron Carter and Chip Carter watch, January 1978.
Carter in Plains, 2008
James Earl Carter Presidential Statue by Frederick Hart (1994)
alt=Carter, George H. W. Bush, George W. Bush, and Bill Clinton standing next to each other.|Carter (right), walks with, from left, George H. W. Bush, George W. Bush, and Bill Clinton during the dedication of the William J. Clinton Presidential Center and Park in Little Rock, Arkansas on November 18, 2004
alt=Carter sitting in front of the U.S. flag|Carter during a Google Hangout session held during the LBJ Presidential Library Civil Rights Summit in 2014
alt=Carter, Obama, and Clinton standing together.|Carter (right) with President Barack Obama (center) and Bill Clinton (left) on August 28, 2013, the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington
alt=Carter observing a model replica of the USS Jimmy Carter, named after him.|Carter (left) with a replica of the {{USS|Jimmy Carter|SSN-23|6}} with Secretary of the Navy John H. Dalton (right) at a naming ceremony, April 28, 1998
alt=The Jimmy Carter Library and Museum during the daytime.|Jimmy Carter Library and Museum located in Atlanta, Georgia
Carter standing alongside Israeli Prime Minister Menachem Begin, during his 1979 visit

A member of the Democratic Party, he previously served as the 76th governor of Georgia from 1971 to 1975 and as a Georgia state senator from 1963 to 1967.

2008 United States presidential election

The 56th quadrennial presidential election, held on Tuesday, November 4, 2008.

The 56th quadrennial presidential election, held on Tuesday, November 4, 2008.

The incumbent in 2008, George W. Bush. His second term expired at noon on January 20, 2009.
2008 DNC during Stevie Wonder's performance
The Palins and McCains campaigning in Fairfax, Virginia, September 10, 2008, following the Republican National Convention
Obama campaigning as a symbol of change in Cleveland, Ohio with a "Change We Need" sign
Cartogram of the Electoral Votes for 2008 United States presidential election, each square representing one electoral vote. The map shows the impact of winning swing states. Nebraska, being one of two states that are not winner-take-all, for the first time had its votes split, with its second congressional district voting for Obama.
An Obama sign displayed at a home in Arlington, VA, on November 1, 2008.
States/districts in the 2008 United States Presidential election in which the margin of victory was less than 5%. Blue states/districts went for Obama, red for McCain. Yellow states were won by either candidate by 5% or more. Nevada, Colorado, New Mexico, Virginia and Iowa were won by Bush in 2004 but were won by Obama by a margin of more than 5% in 2008.
Swing by state. States are listed by (increasing) percentage of Democratic votes, showing how the share of the vote changed between 2004 and 2008. Excluding the candidates' home states, only five states trended more Republican: Arkansas, Louisiana, Oklahoma, Tennessee and West Virginia.
{{center|Independent:
{{center|Libertarian Party:
{{center|Constitution Party:
{{center|Green Party:
Popular vote by county. Red represents counties that went for McCain; blue represents counties that went for Obama. Connecticut, Hawaii, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, and Vermont had all counties go to Obama. Oklahoma had all counties go to McCain.
Presidential popular votes by county as a scale from red/Republican to blue/Democratic.
Cartogram of popular vote with each county rescaled in proportion to its population. Deeper blue represents a Democratic majority; brighter red represents a Republican majority.<ref>{{cite web|url=http://www-personal.umich.edu/~mejn/election/2008/|title=Election maps|website=www-personal.umich.edu}}</ref>
Voting shifts per county from the 2004 to the 2008 election. Darker blue indicates the county voted more Democratic. Darker red indicates the county voted more Republican.
Results by county, shaded according to winning candidate's percentage of the vote.
Change in vote margins at the county level from the 2004 election to the 2008 election. Obama made dramatic gains in every region of the country except for Arizona (McCain's home state), Alaska (Palin's home state), Appalachia, and the inner South, where McCain improved over Bush.
Results by Congressional Districts, shaded according to winning candidate's percentage of the vote.

The Democratic ticket of Barack Obama, the junior senator from Illinois, and Joe Biden, the senior senator from Delaware, defeated the Republican ticket of John McCain, the senior senator from Arizona, and Sarah Palin, the governor of Alaska.

Percent of self-identified liberals by state in 2018, according to a Gallup poll:

Modern liberalism in the United States

Form of social liberalism found in American politics.

Form of social liberalism found in American politics.

Percent of self-identified liberals by state in 2018, according to a Gallup poll:
Bill Clinton and Tony Blair, adherents of the Third Way

Since the 1960s, the Democratic Party has been considered liberal and the Republican Party has been considered conservative.