Democratic Party (United States)

Andrew Jackson was the seventh president of the United States (1829–1837) and the first Democratic president.
Martin Van Buren was the eighth president of the United States (1837–1841) and the second Democratic president.
Senator Stephen A. Douglas
The 1885 inauguration of Grover Cleveland, the only president with non-consecutive terms
Leaders of the Democratic Party during the first half of the 20th century on 14 June 1913: Secretary of State William J. Bryan, Josephus Daniels, President Woodrow Wilson, Breckinridge Long, William Phillips, and Franklin D. Roosevelt
Franklin D. Roosevelt and Harry S. Truman, 32nd and 33rd presidents of the United States (1933–1945; 1945–1953), featured on a campaign poster for the 1944 presidential election
John F. Kennedy and Lyndon B. Johnson, 35th and 36th presidents of the United States (1961–1963, 1963–1969)
Jimmy Carter, 39th president of the United States (1977–1981), delivering the State of the Union Address in 1979
Bill Clinton, 42nd president of the United States (1993–2001), at The Pentagon in 1998
Barack Obama speaking to College Democrats of America in 2007
President Barack Obama meeting with the Blue Dog Coalition in the State Dining Room of the White House in 2009
Eleanor Roosevelt at the 1956 Democratic National Convention in Chicago
President Barack Obama signing the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act into law at the White House on March 23, 2010
Secretary of State John Kerry addressing delegates at the United Nations before signing the Paris Agreement on April 22, 2016
Shirley Chisholm was the first major-party African American candidate to run nationwide primary campaigns.
President Lyndon B. Johnson signing the Immigration Act of 1965 as Vice President Hubert Humphrey, Senators Edward M. Kennedy and Robert F. Kennedy and others look on
Then-Senator Barack Obama shaking hands with an American soldier in Basra, Iraq in 2008
President Jimmy Carter and Israeli Prime Minister Menachem Begin in 1978
Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu meeting with President Barack Obama at Ben Gurion Airport in 2013
Self-identified Democrats (blue) versus self-identified Republicans (red) (January–June 2010 data)
Higher percentages of Democrats than Republicans are members of union households.
Elected at age 33, Jon Ossoff is currently the youngest member of the U.S. Senate.
Hillary Clinton was the first woman to be nominated for president by a major party.
Secretary of Transportation Pete Buttigieg
Vice President Kamala Harris
Julián Castro served as Secretary of Housing and Urban Development.
U.S. Senator Tammy Duckworth
Secretary of the Interior Deb Haaland
Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi
U.S. Senator Kyrsten Sinema
Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer
U.S. opinion on gun control issues is deeply divided along political lines, as shown in this 2021 survey.

One of the two major contemporary political parties in the United States.

- Democratic Party (United States)

310 related topics

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Official portrait, 1965

Hubert Humphrey

American pharmacist and politician who served as the 38th vice president of the United States from 1965 to 1969.

American pharmacist and politician who served as the 38th vice president of the United States from 1965 to 1969.

Official portrait, 1965
Humphrey working as a pharmacist in his father's pharmacy.
Humphrey at the 1948 Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia.
Senator Humphrey
In the 1960 primaries, Humphrey won South Dakota and Washington, D.C.
Vice President-elect Humphrey alongside Coretta Scott King and Civil Rights Leader Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.
Humphrey (right) with President Johnson (left) horse-riding in LBJ ranch on November 4, 1964.
Vice President Humphrey at a meeting in the Oval Office, June 21, 1965
Humphrey with Soviet cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin and Gemini 4 astronauts at the 1965 Paris Air Show
Vice President Hubert Humphrey, President Lyndon Johnson, and General Creighton Abrams in a Cabinet Room meeting in March 1968
Hubert Humphrey campaigning for President in 1968
Senator Hubert Humphrey with Democratic presidential nominee Jimmy Carter, in 1976. California Governor Jerry Brown is at right.
1972 campaign logo
Senator Hubert Humphrey with President Jimmy Carter aboard Air Force One in 1977
Burial plot of Hubert and Muriel Humphrey at Lakewood Cemetery in Minneapolis

In 1944, Humphrey was one of the key players in the merger of the Democratic and Farmer-Labor parties of Minnesota to form the Minnesota Democratic-Farmer-Labor Party (DFL).

The 1963 March on Washington participants and leaders marching from the Washington Monument to the Lincoln Memorial

Civil rights movement

Political movement and campaign from 1954 to 1968 in the United States to abolish institutional racial segregation, discrimination, and disenfranchisement throughout the United States.

Political movement and campaign from 1954 to 1968 in the United States to abolish institutional racial segregation, discrimination, and disenfranchisement throughout the United States.

The 1963 March on Washington participants and leaders marching from the Washington Monument to the Lincoln Memorial
The mob-style lynching of Will James, Cairo, Illinois, 1909
Lynching victim Will Brown, who was mutilated and burned during the Omaha, Nebraska race riot of 1919. Postcards and photographs of lynchings were popular souvenirs in the U.S.
KKK night rally near Chicago, in the 1920s
Colored Sailors room in World War I
A white gang looking for blacks during the Chicago race riot of 1919
White tenants seeking to prevent blacks from moving into the housing project erected this sign, Detroit, 1942.
In 1954, the U.S. Supreme Court under Chief Justice Earl Warren ruled unanimously that racial segregation in public schools was unconstitutional.
School integration, Barnard School, Washington, D.C., 1955
Emmett Till’s mother Mamie (middle) at her son's funeral in 1955. He was killed by white men after a white woman accused him of offending her in her family's grocery store.
Rosa Parks being fingerprinted after being arrested for not giving up her seat on a bus to a white person
White parents rally against integrating Little Rock's schools
Student sit-in at Woolworth in Durham, North Carolina on February 10, 1960
A mob beats Freedom Riders in Birmingham. This picture was reclaimed by the FBI from a local journalist who also was beaten and whose camera was smashed.
James Meredith walking to class accompanied by a U.S. Marshal and a Justice Department official
U.S. Army trucks loaded with Federal law enforcement personnel on the University of Mississippi campus 1962
Recreation of Martin Luther King Jr.'s cell in Birmingham Jail at the National Civil Rights Museum
Wreckage at the Gaston Motel following the bomb explosion on May 11, 1963
Congress of Racial Equality march in Washington D.C. on September 22, 1963, in memory of the children killed in the Birmingham bombings
Alabama governor George Wallace tried to block desegregation at the University of Alabama and is confronted by U.S. Deputy Attorney General Nicholas Katzenbach in 1963.
The March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom at the National Mall
Leaders of the March on Washington posing before the Lincoln Memorial on August 28, 1963
Bayard Rustin (left) and Cleveland Robinson (right), organizers of the March, on August 7, 1963
Martin Luther King Jr. at a civil rights march on Washington, D.C.
Malcolm X meets with Martin Luther King Jr., March 26, 1964
"We Cater to White Trade Only" sign on a restaurant window in Lancaster, Ohio, in 1938. In 1964, Martin Luther King Jr. was arrested and spent a night in jail for attempting to eat at a white-only restaurant in St. Augustine, Florida.
White segregationists (foreground) trying to prevent black people from swimming at a "White only" beach in St. Augustine during the 1964 Monson Motor Lodge protests
Missing persons poster created by the FBI in 1964 shows the photographs of Andrew Goodman, James Chaney, and Michael Schwerner
Lyndon B. Johnson signs the historic Civil Rights Act of 1964
President Lyndon B. Johnson (center) meets with civil rights leaders Martin Luther King Jr., Whitney Young, and James Farmer, January 1964
Police attack non-violent marchers on "Bloody Sunday", the first day of the Selma to Montgomery marches.
Police arrest a man during the Watts riots in Los Angeles, August 1965
A 3,000-person shantytown called Resurrection City was established in 1968 on the National Mall as part of the Poor People's Campaign.
Mississippi State Penitentiary
Fannie Lou Hamer of the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party (and other Mississippi-based organizations) is an example of local grassroots leadership in the movement.
Armed Lumbee Indians aggressively confronting Klansmen in the Battle of Hayes Pond
Jewish civil rights activist Joseph L. Rauh Jr. marching with Martin Luther King Jr. in 1963
Gold medalist Tommie Smith (center) and bronze medalist John Carlos (right) showing the raised fist on the podium after the 200 m race at the 1968 Summer Olympics; both wear Olympic Project for Human Rights badges. Peter Norman (silver medalist, left) from Australia also wears an OPHR badge in solidarity with Smith and Carlos.
Mural of Malcolm X in Belfast
Ku Klux Klan demonstration in St. Augustine, Florida in 1964
Attorney General Robert Kennedy speaking before a hostile Civil Rights crowd protesting low minority hiring in his Justice Department June 14, 1963

During this period, the white-dominated Democratic Party maintained political control of the South.

2004 United States presidential election

The 55th quadrennial presidential election, held on Tuesday, November 2, 2004.

The 55th quadrennial presidential election, held on Tuesday, November 2, 2004.

Senator Kerry at a primary rally in St. Louis, Missouri, at the St. Louis Community College – Forest Park
David Cobb, the Green Party candidate
Libertarian candidate Michael Badnarik
Bush speaking at campaign rally in St. Petersburg, Florida, October 19, 2004
Neighboring yard signs for Bush and Kerry in Grosse Pointe, Michigan
These maps show the amount of attention given by the campaigns to the close states. At left, each waving hand represents a visit from a presidential or vice-presidential candidate during the final five weeks. At right, each dollar sign represents one million dollars spent on TV advertising by the campaigns during the same time period.
Cheney visited Washington & Jefferson College in Pennsylvania on October 27, 2004
Bush in the Oval Office, receiving a concession phone call from Kerry, which came the afternoon of the day following the election after Ohio Secretary of State Ken Blackwell declared that it would be statistically impossible for Kerry to overcome Bush's lead in the state's results
Map of election day problems
Presidential electoral votes by state. Red is Republican; blue is Democratic.
Presidential popular votes by county. Note substantially more "mixing" of colors.
Presidential popular votes by county as a scale from red/Republican to blue/Democratic.
Presidential popular votes cartogram, in which the sizes of counties have been rescaled according to their population.
Cartogram in which each square represents one electoral vote.
Results by county, shaded according to winning candidate's percentage of the vote.
Change in vote margins at the county level from the 2000 election to the 2004 election. While Bush improved nationally overall, making his strongest gains in the South, he suffered a loss of support in parts of New England and the Western United States, which swung in Kerry's favor.
Results by congressional district.

The Republican ticket of incumbent President George W. Bush and his running mate incumbent Vice President Dick Cheney were elected to a second term, defeating the Democratic ticket of John Kerry, a United States senator from Massachusetts and his running mate John Edwards, a United States senator from North Carolina.

New York (state)

State in the Northeastern United States.

State in the Northeastern United States.

New York was dominated by Iroquoian (purple) and Algonquian (pink) tribes.
New Amsterdam, present-day Lower Manhattan, 1660
New York and neighboring provinces, by Claude Joseph Sauthier, 1777
British general John Burgoyne surrenders at Saratoga in 1777
1800 map of New York from Low's Encyclopaedia
The Erie Canal at Lockport, New York, in 1839
Flight 175 hitting the South Tower on September11, 2001
Flooding on AvenueC in Lower Manhattan caused by Hurricane Sandy
New York is bordered by six U.S. states, two Great Lakes, and the Canadian provinces of Ontario and Quebec.
Enveloped by the Atlantic Ocean and Long Island Sound, New York City and Long Island alone are home to about eleven million residents conjointly.
Lake-effect snow is a major contributor to heavy snowfall totals in western New York, including the Tug Hill region.
Two major state parks (in green) are the Adirondack Park (north) and the Catskill Park (south).
The Statue of Liberty in New York Harbor is a symbol of the United States and its ideals.
The African Burial Ground National Monument in Lower Manhattan
Map of the counties in New York
New York population distribution map. New York's population is primarily concentrated in the Greater New York area, including New York City and Long Island.
The Stonewall Inn in the gay village of Greenwich Village, Lower Manhattan, site of the June 1969 Stonewall riots, the cradle of the modern LGBT rights movement
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The main laboratory building of the IBM Watson Research Center is located in Yorktown Heights, New York.
Times Square in Midtown Manhattan, hub of the Broadway theater district, a media center, and one of the world's busiest pedestrian intersections
"I Love New York"
CMA CGM Theodore Roosevelt, the largest container ship to enter the Port of New York and New Jersey as of September7, 2017
Harris Hall of the City College of New York, a public college of the City University of New York
Butler Library at Columbia University
University of Rochester
South campus of the University at Buffalo, the flagship of the State University of New York
The New York City Subway is one of the world's busiest, serving more than five million passengers per average weekday.
Grand Central Terminal in New York City
John F. Kennedy Airport in Queens, the busiest international air passenger gateway to the United States
The New York State Capitol in Albany
New York State Court of Appeals
Kirsten Gillibrand and Chuck Schumer, New York's U.S. Senators
Kathy Hochul (D), the 57th Governor of New York
Yankee Stadium in The Bronx
Koppen climate of New York

As of April 2016, Democrats represented a plurality of voters in New York State, constituting more than twice as many registered voters as any other political party affiliation or lack thereof.

New Jersey

State in the Mid-Atlantic and Northeastern regions of the United States.

State in the Mid-Atlantic and Northeastern regions of the United States.

The relative location of the New Netherland and New Sweden settlements in eastern North America
Washington Crossing the Delaware in the winter of 1777, during the New York and New Jersey campaign (painting by Emanuel Leutze, 1851)
George Washington rallying his troops at the Battle of Princeton
A map of the 107-mile long Morris Canal across northern New Jersey
New Jersey, seen here in Warrren County, shares the Delaware Water Gap with neighboring Pennsylvania.
The Raritan River is the longest river entirely within New Jersey, flowing from the Raritan Valley near Clinton, Hunterdon County (above), eastward to the Raritan Bay.
Part of the Palisades Interstate Park, the cliffs of the New Jersey Palisades in Bergen (seen here) and Hudson counties overlook the Hudson River.
The Great Falls of the Passaic River in Paterson, Passaic County, dedicated as a U.S. National Historical Park in November 2011, incorporates one of the largest waterfalls in the eastern United States.
New Jersey population density map (2020)
Race and ethnicity (2015)
Bergen County (버건 군), New Jersey, across the George Washington Bridge from New York City (뉴욕), is a growing hub and home to [[List of U.S. cities with significant Korean-American populations#Top ten municipalities as ranked by Korean-American percentage of overall population in 2010|all of the nation's top ten municipalities by percentage of Korean population]], led (above) by Palisades Park (벼랑 공원), the municipality with the highest List of U.S. cities with significant Korean-Ameridensity of ethnic Koreans in the Western Hemisphere. Displaying ubiquitous Hangul (한글) signage and known as the Korean village, Palisades Park uniquely comprises a Korean majority (52% in 2010) of its population, with both the [[List of U.S. cities with significant Korean-American populations#Municipalities with density of at least 500 Korean Americans per square mile in 2010|highest Korean-American density and percentage]] of any municipality in the United States.
India Square, in Bombay, Jersey City, home to the highest concentration of Asian Indians in the Western Hemisphere. Immigrants from India constituted the largest foreign-born nationality in New Jersey in 2013.
Beth Medrash Govoha (Hebrew:בית מדרש גבוה), in Lakewood Township, Ocean County, is the world's largest yeshiva outside the State of Israel. Orthodox Jews represent one of the fastest-growing segments of New Jersey's population.
Metropolitan statistical areas and divisions of New Jersey. The New York City Metropolitan Area includes the counties shaded in blue hues, as well as Mercer and Warren counties, the latter representing part of the Lehigh Valley. Counties shaded in green hues, as well as Atlantic, Cape May, and Cumberland counties, belong to the Philadelphia Metropolitan Area.
A heat map showing median income distribution by county in New Jersey
Cranberry harvest
Atlantic City is an oceanfront resort and the nexus of New Jersey's gambling industry.
Old Queens at Rutgers University, the flagship of public higher education in New Jersey
Nassau Hall at Princeton University, one of the world's most prominent research universities
Downtown New Brunswick, an educational and cultural district undergoing gentrification
A 1950s-style diner in Orange, Essex County
MetLife Stadium in East Rutherford is home to the NFL's New York Giants and New York Jets, and the most expensive stadium ever built.
The Prudential Center in Newark, home of the NHL's New Jersey Devils
Red Bull Arena in Harrison, home of the MLS's New York Red Bulls
New Jersey's area codes
Map of New Jersey showing major transportation networks and cities
The George Washington Bridge, connecting Fort Lee (foreground) in Bergen County across the Hudson River to New York City, is the world's busiest motor vehicle bridge.
A NJ Transit train heads down the Northeast Corridor through Rahway, New Jersey
Two Hudson-Bergen Light Rail trains in Jersey City
The Cape May–Lewes Ferry connects New Jersey and Delaware across Delaware Bay.
The New Jersey State House in Trenton
Atlantic City Boardwalk view from Caesars Atlantic City. Opened in 1870, it was the first boardwalk built in the United States. At 5+1/2 mi long, it is also the longest in the world.
High-rise residential complexes in the borough of Fort Lee
Paterson, known as the "Silk City",<ref>{{cite web|url=http://www.patersonnj.gov/|title=City of Paterson—Silk City|access-date=April 2, 2013|archive-url=https://web.archive.org/web/20131109161822/http://www.patersonnj.gov/|archive-date=November 9, 2013|url-status=live}}</ref> has become a prime destination for an internationally diverse pool of immigrants,<ref>{{cite web|url=http://yumimmigrantcity.com/restaurants/machu-picchu/a-brief-history-of-peruvian-immigration-to-the-united-states/|title=A Brief History of Peruvian Immigration to the United States|publisher=yumimmigrantcity.com|access-date=April 2, 2013|url-status=dead|archive-url=https://web.archive.org/web/20130731004838/http://yumimmigrantcity.com/restaurants/machu-picchu/a-brief-history-of-peruvian-immigration-to-the-united-states/|archive-date=July 31, 2013}}</ref><ref>{{cite magazine|url=http://thealternativepress.com/articles/patersons-bengali-community-takes-pride-in-akhta|title=Paterson's Bengali Community Takes Pride in Akhtaruzzaman's Upset Victory|author1=Joe Malinconico|author2=Charlie Kratovil|name-list-style=amp|magazine=The Alternative Press|date=May 9, 2012|access-date=April 2, 2013|archive-url=https://web.archive.org/web/20130514190904/http://thealternativepress.com/articles/patersons-bengali-community-takes-pride-in-akhta|archive-date=May 14, 2013|url-status=dead}}</ref> with at least 52 distinct ethnic groups.<ref>{{cite web|url=http://www.northjersey.com/news/political-battle-brewing-over-paterson-s-plans-for-hispanic-heritage-month-event-1.1096285|title=Political battle brewing over Paterson's plans for Hispanic Heritage Month event|author=Joe Malinconico|date=September 25, 2014|access-date=September 27, 2014|archive-url=https://web.archive.org/web/20140926133042/http://www.northjersey.com/news/political-battle-brewing-over-paterson-s-plans-for-hispanic-heritage-month-event-1.1096285|archive-date=September 26, 2014|url-status=live}}</ref>
Skyscrapers in Jersey City, one of the most ethnically diverse cities in the world<ref name=DiverseJC1>{{cite news|url=http://www.nj.com/hudson/index.ssf/2015/02/jersey_city_named_most_ethnically_linguistically_d.html|title=Jersey City named most diverse city in America: report|author=Summer Dawn Hortillosa|work=The Jersey Journal|date=February 17, 2015|access-date=May 16, 2015|archive-url=https://web.archive.org/web/20150518105950/http://www.nj.com/hudson/index.ssf/2015/02/jersey_city_named_most_ethnically_linguistically_d.html|archive-date=May 18, 2015|url-status=live}}</ref><ref name=DiverseJC2>{{cite web|url=http://www.movoto.com/jersey-city-nj/jersey-city-facts/|title=53 Things You Probably Didn't Know About Jersey City|author=Spencer McKee|publisher=Movoto|access-date=May 16, 2015|archive-url=https://web.archive.org/web/20150518094715/http://www.movoto.com/jersey-city-nj/jersey-city-facts/|archive-date=May 18, 2015|url-status=live}}</ref>
Federal Courthouse in Camden, which is connected to Philadelphia via the Benjamin Franklin Bridge in the background
Cathedral Basilica of the Sacred Heart in Newark, the fifth-largest cathedral in North America, is the seat of the city's Roman Catholic Archdiocese.
Temple Sharey Tefilo-Israel, in South Orange, Essex County. New Jersey is home to the second-highest Jewish American population per capita, after New York.
Swaminarayan Akshardham (Devnagari) in Robbinsville, Mercer County, inaugurated in 2014 as the world's largest Hindu temple<ref name="World'sLargestHinduTempleNJ">{{cite web|url=https://www.nbcnews.com/news/asian-america/worlds-largest-hindu-temple-being-built-new-jersey-n166616|title=World's Largest Hindu Temple Being Built in New Jersey|author=Frances Kai-Hwa Wang|publisher=NBC News|access-date=December 3, 2016|archive-url=https://web.archive.org/web/20161209184002/http://www.nbcnews.com/news/asian-america/worlds-largest-hindu-temple-being-built-new-jersey-n166616|archive-date=December 9, 2016|url-status=live}}</ref>
Islamic Center of Passaic County, Paterson, Passaic County, was founded in 1990. New Jersey has the largest Muslim Population in America, and Paterson which is where the Islamic Center of Passaic County is in has New Jersey's largest Muslim community which lead to South Paterson getting the nicknames "Little Istanbul" and "Little Ramallah".<ref>{{cite web |title=Muslims By State |url=https://www.pewforum.org/religious-landscape-study/religious-tradition/muslim/ |access-date=January 25, 2022 |archive-date=January 25, 2022 |archive-url=https://web.archive.org/web/20220125192549/https://www.pewforum.org/religious-landscape-study/religious-tradition/muslim/ |url-status=live }}</ref>

Phil Murphy (D) is the governor.

State races by 2020 United States presidential election margin.

Swing state

In American politics, the term swing state (or battleground state) refers to any state that could reasonably be won by either the Democratic or Republican presidential candidate by a swing in votes.

In American politics, the term swing state (or battleground state) refers to any state that could reasonably be won by either the Democratic or Republican presidential candidate by a swing in votes.

State races by 2020 United States presidential election margin.

A campaign strategy centered on them, however, would not have been meaningful in the Electoral College, as Democratic nominee Walter Mondale required victories in many more states than Massachusetts, Republican Ronald Reagan still would have won by a large margin.

Sanders in March 2020

Bernie Sanders

American politician and activist who has served as the junior United States senator from Vermont since 2007.

American politician and activist who has served as the junior United States senator from Vermont since 2007.

Sanders in March 2020
Sanders as a senior in high school, 1959
Burlington City Hall
Representative Sanders in 1991
Sanders meeting in 1993 with Hillary Clinton to discuss her plan to reform the healthcare system
Sanders meeting with students at Milton High School in Milton, Vermont, 2004
Senate portrait, 2007
Sanders being sworn in for his second term in 2013 by Joe Biden
Don't Take Our Health Care rally in Columbus, Ohio, June 2017
Sanders introduced legislation to raise the federal minimum wage to $15 an hour, April 2017
Sanders speaking to members of the Vermont Army National Guard sent to Washington, D.C. as security preparations for the inauguration of Joe Biden in 2021
Sanders rally in Portland, Oregon, August 2015
Sanders speaking at Rutgers University in May 2016
Sanders campaigning for Hillary Clinton at Nashua Community College in October 2016
Sanders campaigning for president in San Jose, California, March 2020
Sanders steps out of a Sikorsky UH-60 Black Hawk helicopter after arriving in Afghanistan in 2011
Sanders with his wife Jane O'Meara in Des Moines, Iowa, January 2016

He has a close relationship with the Democratic Party, having caucused with House and Senate Democrats for most of his congressional career.

Official portrait, 1994

Al Gore

American politician and environmentalist who served as the 45th vice president of the United States from 1993 to 2001 under president Bill Clinton.

American politician and environmentalist who served as the 45th vice president of the United States from 1993 to 2001 under president Bill Clinton.

Official portrait, 1994
Albert Gore Sr. delivering a speech to the 1968 Democratic National Convention which the younger Gore helped him write
Tipper and Al Gore on their wedding day, May 19, 1970, at the Washington National Cathedral
Gore with the 20th Engineer Brigade in Biên Hòa as a journalist with the paper The Castle Courier
Gore in 1977
Gore during his congressional years
The Clintons and the Gores as Chelsea Clinton rings a replica of the Liberty Bell, 1993
President Bill Clinton installing computer cables with Vice President Al Gore on NetDay at Ygnacio Valley High School in Concord, CA. March 9, 1996
Glenn T. Seaborg with Gore in the White House during a visit of the 1993 Science Talent Search (STS) finalists on March 4, 1993
Vice President Gore and President Clinton during the second inauguration of Bill Clinton, January 20, 1997
In Manchester, New Hampshire, campaigning for President of the United States in 2000
Gore in 2000
Chris Anderson asks: "Will you run again?" Gore replies, "Ohh, you aren't going to get me on this one!"
Gore speaks during the final day of the 2008 Democratic National Convention in Denver, Colorado
Gore receives the Nobel Peace Prize in the city hall of Oslo, 2007
President George W. Bush meets with Al Gore and the other 2007 Nobel Award recipients, November 26, 2007
Gore's speech on Global Warming at the University of Miami BankUnited Center, February 28, 2007

Gore was the Democratic nominee for the 2000 presidential election, losing to George W. Bush in a very close race after a Florida recount.

Graph showing historical party control of the U.S. Senate, House and Presidency since 1855

United States Senate

Upper chamber of the United States Congress, with the House of Representatives being the lower chamber.

Upper chamber of the United States Congress, with the House of Representatives being the lower chamber.

Graph showing historical party control of the U.S. Senate, House and Presidency since 1855
Members of the United States Senate for the 117th Congress
A typical Senate desk
The Senate side of the United States Capitol in Washington, D.C.
Committee Room 226 in the Dirksen Senate Office Building is used for hearings by the Senate Judiciary Committee.
The Senate has the power to try impeachments; shown above is Theodore R. Davis's drawing of the impeachment trial of President Andrew Johnson, 1868
U.S. Senate chamber c. 1873: two or three spittoons are visible by desks

The Democratic Party traditionally sits to the presiding officer's right, and the Republican Party traditionally sits to the presiding officer's left, regardless of which party has a majority of seats.

Official campaign portrait, 1944

Franklin D. Roosevelt

American politician and attorney who served as the 32nd president of the United States from 1933 until his death in 1945.

American politician and attorney who served as the 32nd president of the United States from 1933 until his death in 1945.

Official campaign portrait, 1944
Eleanor and Franklin with their first two children, 1908
Roosevelt in 1944
Roosevelt supported Governor Woodrow Wilson in the 1912 presidential election.
Theodore Roosevelt was Franklin Roosevelt's distant cousin and an important influence on his career.
Roosevelt as Assistant Secretary of the Navy, 1913
Cox and Roosevelt in Ohio, 1920
Rare photograph of Roosevelt in a wheelchair, with Fala and Ruthie Bie, the daughter of caretakers at his Hyde Park estate. Photo taken by his cousin Margaret Suckley (February 1941).
Gov. Roosevelt with his predecessor Al Smith, 1930
Results of the 1930 gubernatorial election in New York
Roosevelt in the early 1930s
1932 electoral vote results
Roosevelt signs the Social Security Act into law, August 14, 1935
1936 re-election handbill for Roosevelt promoting his economic policy
1936 electoral vote results
Roosevelt with Brazilian President Getúlio Vargas and other dignitaries in Brazil, 1936
The Roosevelts with King George VI and Queen Elizabeth, sailing from Washington, D.C., to Mount Vernon, Virginia, on the USS Potomac during the first U.S. visit of a reigning British monarch (June 9, 1939)
Foreign trips of Roosevelt during his presidency
1940 electoral vote results
Roosevelt and Winston Churchill aboard HMS Prince of Wales for 1941 Atlantic Charter meeting
Territory controlled by the Allies (blue and red) and the Axis Powers (black) in June 1942
The Allies (blue and red) and the Axis Powers (black) in December 1944
1944 electoral vote results
Official portrait of President Roosevelt by Frank O. Salisbury, c. 1947
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As a member of the Democratic Party, he won a record four presidential elections and became a central figure in world events during the first half of the 20th century.