Dennis Ritchie

Dennis M. RitchieRitchieDennis MacAlistair RitchieD. M. RitchieD.M. RitchieDMRRitcheRitchie, Dennis
Dennis MacAlistair Ritchie (September 9, 1941 – c. undefined October 12, 2011) was an American computer scientist.wikipedia
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C (programming language)

CC programming languageC language
He created the C programming language and, with long-time colleague Ken Thompson, the Unix operating system and B programming language.
C was originally developed at Bell Labs by Dennis Ritchie between 1972 and 1973 to make utilities running on Unix.

Unix

UNIX operating systemAT&T UnixUnix-like
He created the C programming language and, with long-time colleague Ken Thompson, the Unix operating system and B programming language. In 1970, Brian Kernighan suggested the name "Unix", a pun on the name "Multics".
Unix (trademarked as UNIX) is a family of multitasking, multiuser computer operating systems that derive from the original AT&T Unix, development starting in the 1970s at the Bell Labs research center by Ken Thompson, Dennis Ritchie, and others.

B (programming language)

BB programming languageB language
He created the C programming language and, with long-time colleague Ken Thompson, the Unix operating system and B programming language.
It is the work of Ken Thompson with Dennis Ritchie.

Ken Thompson

Kenneth Lane ThompsonK. ThompsonKen L. Thompson
He created the C programming language and, with long-time colleague Ken Thompson, the Unix operating system and B programming language. During the 1960s, Ritchie and Ken Thompson worked on the Multics operating system at Bell Labs.
In the 1960s at Bell Labs, Thompson and Dennis Ritchie worked on the Multics operating system.

The C Programming Language

CK&RK&R C
He was the "R" in K&R C, and commonly known by his username dmr.
The C Programming Language (sometimes termed K&R, after its authors' initials) is a computer programming book written by Brian Kernighan and Dennis Ritchie, the latter of whom originally designed and implemented the language, as well as co-designing the Unix operating system with which development of the language was closely intertwined.

Turing Award

ACM Turing AwardA.M. Turing AwardA. M. Turing Award
Ritchie and Thompson were awarded the Turing Award from the ACM in 1983, the Hamming Medal from the IEEE in 1990 and the National Medal of Technology from President Bill Clinton in 1999.

Brian Kernighan

Brian W. KernighanKernighanB. Kernighan
In 1970, Brian Kernighan suggested the name "Unix", a pun on the name "Multics".
He worked at Bell Labs and contributed to the development of Unix alongside Unix creators Ken Thompson and Dennis Ritchie.

Bell Labs

Bell LaboratoriesBell Telephone LaboratoriesAT&T Bell Laboratories
His father was Alistair E. Ritchie, a longtime Bell Labs scientist and co-author of The Design of Switching Circuits on switching circuit theory.
In 1969, Dennis Ritchie and Ken Thompson created the computer operating system UNIX for the support of telecommunication switching systems as well as general purpose computing.

National Medal of Technology and Innovation

National Medal of TechnologyNational Medals of TechnologyNational Medals of Technology and Innovation
Ritchie and Thompson were awarded the Turing Award from the ACM in 1983, the Hamming Medal from the IEEE in 1990 and the National Medal of Technology from President Bill Clinton in 1999.

Plan 9 from Bell Labs

Plan 9Glenda, the Plan 9 BunnyPlan9
Ritchie was also involved with the development of the Plan 9 and Inferno operating systems, and the programming language Limbo.
The Plan 9 team was initially led by Rob Pike, Ken Thompson, Dave Presotto and Phil Winterbottom, with support from Dennis Ritchie as head of the Computing Techniques Research Department.

Patrick C. Fischer

Patrick Carl FischerPatrick Fischer
In 1967, Ritchie began working at the Bell Labs Computing Sciences Research Center, and in 1968, he defended his PhD thesis on "Program Structure and Computational Complexity" at Harvard under the supervision of Patrick C. Fischer.
as well as noted computer scientists Dennis Ritchie and Arnold L. Rosenberg.

Linux

GNU/LinuxLinux on the desktopLin
In an interview from 1999, Ritchie clarified that he saw Linux and BSD operating systems as a continuation of the basis of the Unix operating system, and as derivatives of Unix:
The Unix operating system was conceived and implemented in 1969, at AT&T's Bell Laboratories in the United States by Ken Thompson, Dennis Ritchie, Douglas McIlroy, and Joe Ossanna.

Bronxville, New York

BronxvilleBronxville, NYBronxville, N.Y.
Dennis Ritchie was born in Bronxville, New York.

Multics

Multics operating systemMultics project
During the 1960s, Ritchie and Ken Thompson worked on the Multics operating system at Bell Labs.
The design and features of Multics greatly influenced the Unix operating system, which was originally written by two Multics programmers, Ken Thompson and Dennis Ritchie.

Summit, New Jersey

SummitSummit, NJSummit City
As a child, Dennis moved with his family to Summit, New Jersey, where he graduated from Summit High School.

Japan Prize

Japan Prize for Information and Communications
In 2011, Ritchie, along with Thompson, was awarded the Japan Prize for Information and Communications for his work in the development of the Unix operating system.

Summit High School (New Jersey)

Summit High SchoolSummit Senior High SchoolSummit
As a child, Dennis moved with his family to Summit, New Jersey, where he graduated from Summit High School.

Research Unix

Version 10 UnixVersion 5 UnixVersion 3 Unix
They were so influential on Research Unix that Doug McIlroy later wrote, "The names of Ritchie and Thompson may safely be assumed to be attached to almost everything not otherwise attributed."

M-209

C-38C-SeriesC38
During the 1970s, Ritchie collaborated with James Reeds and Robert Morris on a ciphertext-only attack on the M-209 US cipher machine that could solve messages of at least 2000–2500 letters.
US researcher Dennis Ritchie has described a 1970s collaboration with James Reeds and Robert Morris on a ciphertext-only attack on the M-209 that could solve messages of at least 2000–2500 letters.

Fedora version history

Fedora 1622Fedora 12
The Fedora 16 Linux distribution, which was released about a month after he died, was dedicated to his memory.
Fedora 16 was also dedicated to the memory of Dennis Ritchie, who died about a month before the release.

Limbo (programming language)

LimboDis virtual machineDis
Ritchie was also involved with the development of the Plan 9 and Inferno operating systems, and the programming language Limbo.

Man page

man pagesmanmanual page
The first actual man pages were written by Dennis Ritchie and Ken Thompson at the insistence of their manager Doug McIlroy in 1971.

Robert Morris (cryptographer)

Robert MorrisBob MorrisRobert Morris Sr.
During the 1970s, Ritchie collaborated with James Reeds and Robert Morris on a ciphertext-only attack on the M-209 US cipher machine that could solve messages of at least 2000–2500 letters.

IRI Achievement Award

Achievement Award
In 2005, the Industrial Research Institute awarded Ritchie its Achievement Award in recognition of his contribution to science and technology, and to society generally, with his development of the Unix operating system.