Departments of France

departmentdépartementdepartmentsdépartementsFrench departmentdepartementdépartmentsouverainetéFrench departmentsdepartment of France
In the administrative divisions of France, the department (département, ) is one of the three levels of government below the national level ("territorial collectivities"), between the administrative regions and the commune.wikipedia
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Departmental council (France)

General CouncilConseil généralDepartmental council
Each department is administered by an elected body called a departmental council (conseil départemental [sing.], conseils départementaux [plur.]).
]]The departmental councils (French: conseils départementaux; singular, conseil départemental) of France are representative assemblies elected by universal suffrage in 98 of the country's 101 departments.

Regions of France

regionrégionadministrative region
In the administrative divisions of France, the department (département, ) is one of the three levels of government below the national level ("territorial collectivities"), between the administrative regions and the commune.
All 13 mainland administrative regions (including Corsica ) are further subdivided into 2 to 13 administrative departments, with the prefect of each region's administrative center's department also acting as the regional prefect.

Overseas department and region

overseas departmentoverseas regionregion
Ninety-five departments are in metropolitan France, and five are overseas departments, which are also classified as regions.
The overseas departments and regions of France (département et régions d’outre-mer or DROM) are departments of France which are outside metropolitan France, the European part of France.

Arrondissements of France

arrondissementarrondissementsdepartmental arrondissements
Departments are further subdivided into 334 arrondissements, themselves divided into cantons; the last two have no autonomy, and are used for the organisation of police, fire departments, and sometimes, elections.
, the 101 French departments were divided into 332 arrondissements (including 12 overseas).

Loiret

45Loiret department45 - Loiret
For example, inhabitants of Loiret might refer to their department as "the 45".
Loiret is a department in the Centre-Val de Loire region of north-central France.

Provinces of France

former provinceprovinceprovince of France
The departments were created in 1790 as a rational replacement of Ancien Régime provinces with a view to strengthen national unity; the title "department" is used to mean a part of a larger whole.
France was organized into provinces until March 4, 1790, when the establishment of the department (French: département) system superseded provinces.

Cantons of France

cantoncantonsadministrative division
Departments are further subdivided into 334 arrondissements, themselves divided into cantons; the last two have no autonomy, and are used for the organisation of police, fire departments, and sometimes, elections.
The cantons of France are territorial subdivisions of the French Republic's departments and arrondissements.

Prefect (France)

prefectpréfetPrefect of Saint Barthélemy
Local services of the state administration are traditionally organised at departmental level, where the prefect represents the government; however, regions have gained importance in this regard since the 2000s, with some department-level services merged into region-level services.
A prefect (préfet) in France is the state's representative in a department or region.

130 departments of the First French Empire

Departmentdépartements130 departments
The number of departments, initially 83, had been increased to 130 by 1809 with the territorial gains of the Republic and of the First French Empire.
This is a list of the 130 departments (départements), the conventional name for the administrative subdivisions of the First French Empire at the height of its territorial extent, circa 1811.

Vehicle registration plates of France

vehicle registration plates French SIV schemeF
The number is used, for example, in the postal code, and was until recently used for all vehicle registration plates.
Cars bought before 2009 can still bear the old format, dating from 1950, if the owner has not moved to a different département since then.

Mont-Blanc (department)

Mont-BlancMont BlancMont-Blanc department
Savoy became the department of Mont-Blanc.
Mont-Blanc was a department of the First French Empire.

Alpes-Maritimes

Alpes Maritimes06A-Marit
Two were added from the new Savoyard territory, while the department of Alpes-Maritimes was created from Nice and a portion of the Var department.
Alpes-Maritimes (Aups Maritims; Alpi Marittime, "Maritime Alps") is a department of France located in the extreme southeast corner of the country, on the border with Italy and on the Mediterranean coast.

Var (department)

VarVar departmentDepartment of Var
Two were added from the new Savoyard territory, while the department of Alpes-Maritimes was created from Nice and a portion of the Var department.
Var is a department in the Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur region in Southeastern France.

François Hollande

Francois HollandeHollandePresident Hollande
In 2014, President François Hollande proposed to abolish departmental councils by 2020, which would have maintained the departments as administrative divisions, and to transfer their powers to other levels of governance.
Hollande also served in the National Assembly of France twice for the department of Corrèze's 1st constituency from 1988 to 1993, and again from 1997 to 2012.

Moselle (department)

MoselleMoselle departmentdepartment of Moselle
The department of Bas-Rhin and parts of Meurthe, Moselle, Vosges and Haut-Rhin were ceded to the German Empire in 1871, following France's defeat in the Franco-Prussian War.
Moselle is the most populous department in Lorraine, in the east of France, and is named after the river Moselle, a tributary of the Rhine, which flows through the western part of the department.

Bas-Rhin

Bas Rhin67Bas-Rhin département
The department of Bas-Rhin and parts of Meurthe, Moselle, Vosges and Haut-Rhin were ceded to the German Empire in 1871, following France's defeat in the Franco-Prussian War.
Bas-Rhin (Alsatian: Unterelsàss, ‘s Unterlànd or ‘s Ingerlànd ) is a department in Alsace which is a part of the Grand Est super-region of France.

Vosges (department)

VosgesVosges departmentVosges département
The department of Bas-Rhin and parts of Meurthe, Moselle, Vosges and Haut-Rhin were ceded to the German Empire in 1871, following France's defeat in the Franco-Prussian War.
Vosges is an eastern department of France named after the Vosges mountain range.

Administrative divisions of France

Administrative division of Franceadministrative division in Franceadministrative entity
In the administrative divisions of France, the department (département, ) is one of the three levels of government below the national level ("territorial collectivities"), between the administrative regions and the commune.

Postal codes in France

Postal codeCEDEXpostal codes
The number is used, for example, in the postal code, and was until recently used for all vehicle registration plates.
France uses five-digit numeric postal codes, the first two digits representing the département in which the city is located.

Territorial collectivity

territorial collectivitiesMetropoliscollectivity
In the administrative divisions of France, the department (département, ) is one of the three levels of government below the national level ("territorial collectivities"), between the administrative regions and the commune.

Meurthe-et-Moselle

Meurthe et MoselleMeurthe-et-Moselle ''département54
A small part of Haut-Rhin however remained French and became known as the Territoire de Belfort; the remaining parts of Meurthe and Moselle were merged into a new Meurthe-et-Moselle department.
Meurthe-et-Moselle is a department in the Grand Est region of France, named after the Meurthe and Moselle rivers.

Territoire de Belfort

Territory of BelfortTerritoire-de-Belfort90
A small part of Haut-Rhin however remained French and became known as the Territoire de Belfort; the remaining parts of Meurthe and Moselle were merged into a new Meurthe-et-Moselle department.
The Territoire de Belfort is a department in the Bourgogne-Franche-Comté region of eastern France.

Seine (department)

SeineSeine departmentdepartment of the Seine
Even Paris was in the department of Seine.
Seine was a department of France encompassing Paris and its immediate suburbs.

Meurthe (department)

MeurtheMeurthe DepartmentDepartment of the Meurthe
The department of Bas-Rhin and parts of Meurthe, Moselle, Vosges and Haut-Rhin were ceded to the German Empire in 1871, following France's defeat in the Franco-Prussian War.
Meurthe is a former department of France created in 1790.

Haut-Rhin

Haut Rhindepartment of Haut-Rhin68
The department of Bas-Rhin and parts of Meurthe, Moselle, Vosges and Haut-Rhin were ceded to the German Empire in 1871, following France's defeat in the Franco-Prussian War.
Haut-Rhin (Alsatian: Owerelsàss or ‘s Iwerlànd ; German: Oberelsass) is a department in the Grand Est region of France, named after the river Rhine.