Dependent clause

subordinate clausesubordinate clausessubordinatedependent clausesdependentembedded clausesubordinationadjectival clauseclauseembedded clauses
A dependent clause is a clause that provides a sentence element with additional information, but which cannot stand as a sentence.wikipedia
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Content clause

indirect questiondeclarative content clausedirect question
The different types of dependent clauses include content clauses (noun clauses), relative (adjectival) clauses, and adverbial clauses.
In grammar, a content clause is a subordinate clause that provides content implied or commented upon by its main clause.

Adverbial clause

adverb clause
The different types of dependent clauses include content clauses (noun clauses), relative (adjectival) clauses, and adverbial clauses. Subordinating conjunctions are used to begin dependent clauses known as adverbial clauses, which serve as adverbs.
An adverbial clause is a dependent clause that functions as an adverb; that is, the entire clause modifies a verb, an adjective, or another adverb.

Clause

clausesfinite clauseclausal
A dependent clause is a clause that provides a sentence element with additional information, but which cannot stand as a sentence.
Subordinate clauses (embedded clauses, dependent clauses) are those that would be awkward or incomplete if they were alone.

Relative clause

relativerelative clausesfree relative clause
The different types of dependent clauses include content clauses (noun clauses), relative (adjectival) clauses, and adverbial clauses. Relative pronouns begin dependent clauses known as relative clauses; these are adjective clauses, because they modify nouns.
A relative clause is a kind of subordinate clause that contains the element whose interpretation is provided by an antecedent on which the subordinate clause is grammatically dependent; that is, there is an anaphoric relation between the relativized element in the relative clause and antecedent on which it depends.

Independent clause

main clausematrix clauseindependent clauses
A dependent clause can either modify an adjacent clause or serve as a component of an independent clause. A complex sentence contains an independent clause and at least one dependent clause.
Dependent clause

Pro-drop language

pro-dropPro-drop languagesdropped
1) Like all dependent clauses, it contains a verb (and also a subject unless it is a non-finite dependent clause). However, in a pro-drop language the subject may be a zero pronoun: the pronoun may not be explicitly included because its identity is conveyed by a verbal inflection.
Colloquial and dialectal German, unlike the standard language, are also partially pro-drop; they typically allow deletion of the subject pronoun in main clauses but not in subordinate clauses.

Conditional sentence

protasisapodosisconditionals
Conditional clause
They are so called because the validity of the main clause of the sentence is conditional on the existence of certain circumstances, which may be expressed in a dependent clause or may be understood from the context.

Infinitive

to''-infinitivebare infinitiveinfinitival
Dependent clauses may be headed by an infinitive, gerund, or other non-finite verb form, which in linguistics is called deranked. For instance:
Here the infinitival clause to get married is contained within the finite dependent clause that Brett Favre is going to get married; this in turn is contained within another infinitival clause, which is contained in the finite independent clause (the whole sentence).

Dependent statement

Dependent statement
In grammar, a dependent statement is a statement converted into a noun clause, normally, in English, by the addition of that at the beginning, and made dependent on another clause (e.g. as subject or object).

Subjunctive mood

subjunctivePresent subjunctiveconjunctive
Subjunctive mood
Subjunctives occur most often, although not exclusively, in subordinate clauses, particularly that-clauses.

Sentence clause structure

complex sentencesimple sentencecompound sentence
A complex sentence contains an independent clause and at least one dependent clause.
A complex sentence has at least one independent clause plus at least one dependent clause.

Conjunction (grammar)

conjunctionconjunctionssubordinating conjunction
One kind of dependent word is a subordinating conjunction.
Subordinating conjunctions, also called subordinators, are conjunctions that join an independent clause and a dependent clause, and also introduce adverb clauses.

Sentence (linguistics)

sentencesentencesdeclarative sentence
A dependent clause is a clause that provides a sentence element with additional information, but which cannot stand as a sentence.
A simple sentence consists of a single independent clause with no dependent clauses.

Indo-European languages

Indo-EuropeanIndo-European languageIndo-European language family
In Indo-European languages, a dependent clause usually begins with a dependent word.

Adverb

adverbsadv.abstract noun
Subordinating conjunctions are used to begin dependent clauses known as adverbial clauses, which serve as adverbs.

Relative pronoun

relativerelative pronounsrel.
Another type of dependent word is the relative pronoun.

Noun

nounssubstantiveabstract noun
Relative pronouns begin dependent clauses known as relative clauses; these are adjective clauses, because they modify nouns.

Interrogative word

interrogative pronouninterrogativeinterrogative pronouns
An interrogative word can serve as an adverb in a noun clause, as in

Verb

verbsv.verbal morphology
(The adverbial clause wherever she goes modifies the verb leaves.)

Subject (grammar)

subjectsubjectsgrammatical subject
It can be a subject, predicate nominative, direct object, appositive, indirect object, or object of the preposition.

Subject complement

predicate nominativecomplementpredicate nominal
It can be a subject, predicate nominative, direct object, appositive, indirect object, or object of the preposition.

Apposition

appositiveappositivesapposite phrase
It can be a subject, predicate nominative, direct object, appositive, indirect object, or object of the preposition.

Object (grammar)

objectdirect objectindirect object
It can be a subject, predicate nominative, direct object, appositive, indirect object, or object of the preposition. (The noun clause why you need experience functions as the direct object of the main-clause verb "understands", and within the noun clause why serves as an adverb modifying need.)

Preposition and postposition

prepositionpostpositionprepositions
It can be a subject, predicate nominative, direct object, appositive, indirect object, or object of the preposition.

Zero (linguistics)

zeroØ
1) Like all dependent clauses, it contains a verb (and also a subject unless it is a non-finite dependent clause). However, in a pro-drop language the subject may be a zero pronoun: the pronoun may not be explicitly included because its identity is conveyed by a verbal inflection.