Dependent territory

dependent territoriesdependencydependenciesdependentterritoriesUnited States territoryAustralian external territorydependencies and other territoriesdependencies and territoriesdependent area
A dependent territory, dependent area or dependency is a territory that does not possess full political independence or sovereignty as a sovereign state yet remains politically outside the controlling state's integral area.wikipedia
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Independence

independentindependent statepolitical independence
A dependent territory, dependent area or dependency is a territory that does not possess full political independence or sovereignty as a sovereign state yet remains politically outside the controlling state's integral area.
The opposite of independence is the status of a dependent territory.

ISO 3166

ISO 3166 Maintenance AgencyGH-UW-WWISO country code
Most inhabited dependent territories have their own ISO 3166 country codes.
ISO 3166 is a standard published by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) that defines codes for the names of countries, dependent territories, special areas of geographical interest, and their principal subdivisions (e.g., provinces or states).

Administrative division

Subdivisionssubdivisionadministrative district
A dependency is commonly distinguished from subnational entities in that they are not considered to be part of the integral territory of the governing state.
Administrative divisions are conceptually separate from dependent territories, with the former being an integral part of the state and the other being only under some lesser form of control.

Tokelau

🇹🇰Union IslandsTK
Tokelau (previously known as the Union Islands, and officially as Tokelau Islands until 1976; lit. "north-northeast" ) is a dependent territory of New Zealand in the southern Pacific Ocean.

Realm of New Zealand

New Zealandassociated states of New ZealandNew Zealand, Realm of
Summary: The Realm of New Zealand includes two self-governing states in free association with New Zealand, one territory (Tokelau), and a territorial claim in Antarctica.
It has one Antarctic territorial claim, the Ross Dependency; one dependent territory, Tokelau; and two associated states, the Cook Islands and Niue.

Anguilla

🇦🇮AnguillanAnguillian
Its politics take place in a framework of a parliamentary representative democratic dependency, whereby the Chief Minister is the head of government, and of a pluriform multi-party system.

United Nations list of Non-Self-Governing Territories

non-self-governing territorynon-self-governing territorieslist of non-self-governing territories
This list includes all territories that have not been legally incorporated into their governing state, including several territories that are not on the list of non-self-governing territories listed by the General Assembly of the United Nations.
The following territories were originally [[s:United Nations Trusteeship Agreements listed by the General Assembly as Non-Self-Governing|listed]] by UN General Assembly Resolution 66 (I) of 14 December 1946 as Trust and Non-Self-Governing territory.

Federated state

statefederal statestates
Although all territories of Australia are considered to be fully integrated in its federative system, and the official status of an external territory does not differ largely from that of a mainland territory (except in regards to immigration law), debate remains as to whether the external territories are integral parts of Australia, due to their not being part of Australia in 1901, when its constituent states federated (with the exception of Coral Sea Islands which was part of Queensland).
In some cases, a federation is created from a union of political entities, which are either independent, or dependent territories of another sovereign entity (most commonly a colonial power).

American Samoa

🇦🇸SamoaAS
Politics of American Samoa takes place in a framework of a presidential representative democratic dependency, whereby the Governor is the head of government, and of a pluriform multi-party system.

Federation

federalfederal governmentfederal state
Although all territories of Australia are considered to be fully integrated in its federative system, and the official status of an external territory does not differ largely from that of a mainland territory (except in regards to immigration law), debate remains as to whether the external territories are integral parts of Australia, due to their not being part of Australia in 1901, when its constituent states federated (with the exception of Coral Sea Islands which was part of Queensland).
Dependent territories, such as the British overseas territories, are vested with varying degrees of power; some enjoy considerable independence from the sovereign state, which only takes care of their foreign relations and defence.

Bermuda

Bermudian🇧🇲Bermuda Islands
Bermuda and Gibraltar have similar relationships to the UK as the Crown dependencies.

Greenland

🇬🇱GreenlandicGL
The Faroes and Greenland are two self-governing territories, or regions within the Kingdom.
Greenland also contains the world's largest national park, and it is the largest dependent territory by area in the world, as well as the fourth largest country subdivision in the world, after Sakha Republic in Russia, Australia's state of Western Australia, and Russia's Krasnoyarsk Krai, and the largest in North America.

Gibraltar

🇬🇮GIBGibraltarian
Bermuda and Gibraltar have similar relationships to the UK as the Crown dependencies.

Autonomous administrative division

autonomousautonomous regionautonomy
Under the Constitution of Puerto Rico, Puerto Rico is described as a Commonwealth and Puerto Ricans have a degree of administrative autonomy similar to citizens of a U.S. state.
An autonomous administrative division (also referred to as an autonomous area, entity, unit, region, subdivision, or territory) is a subdivision or dependent territory of a country that has a degree of self-governance, or autonomy, from an external authority.

Commonwealth (U.S. insular area)

CommonwealthTerritoryU.S. Commonwealth
The commonly used name in Spanish of the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, Estado Libre Asociado de Puerto Rico, literally "Associated Free State of Puerto Rico", which sounds similar to "free association" particularly when loosely used in Spanish, is sometimes erroneously interpreted to mean that Puerto Rico's relationship with United States is based on a Compact of Free Association and at other times erroneously held to mean that Puerto Rico's relationship with United States is based on an Interstate compact.
In the terminology of the United States insular areas, a Commonwealth is a type of organized but unincorporated dependent territory.

Special administrative regions of China

Special Administrative Regionspecial administrative regionsSAR
At present, there are two SARs established according to the Constitution, namely the Hong Kong SAR and the Macau SAR, former British and Portuguese dependencies respectively, transferred to China in 1997 and 1999 respectively pursuant to the Sino-British Joint Declaration of 1984 and the Sino-Portuguese Joint Declaration of 1987.

List of leaders of dependent territories

Current dependent territory leadersCurrent leaders of dependent territories
List of current dependent territory leaders
This is a list of leaders of dependent territories. A dependent territory is a territory that does not possess full political independence or sovereignty as a sovereign state yet remains politically outside of the controlling state's integral area.

Associated state

free associationassociated statesBritish associated state
The Cook Islands and Niue are officially termed associated states.
Tokelau (a dependent territory of New Zealand) voted on a referendum in February 2006 to determine whether it wanted to remain a New Zealand territory or become the third state in free association with New Zealand.

New Zealand

🇳🇿NZLNZ
The Realm of New Zealand also includes Tokelau (a dependent territory); the Cook Islands and Niue (self-governing states in free association with New Zealand); and the Ross Dependency, which is New Zealand's territorial claim in Antarctica.

List of administrative divisions by country

similar administrativeAdministrative divisionsautonomous administrative divisions
List of administrative divisions by country
The table below indicates the types and, where known, numbers of administrative divisions used by countries and their major dependent territories.

List of autonomous areas by country

territorial autonomyautonomousautonomous areas
List of autonomous areas by country
Svalbard, Norway: Although it does not fit the definition of autonomous area (not possessing partial internal sovereignty), Svalbard has the sovereignty of Norway limited by the Spitsbergen Treaty of 1920 and therefore is considered as having special status (as it is considered fully integrated with Norway, and not a dependency, it is a sui generis case).

Svalbard

SpitsbergenSpitzbergenSvalbard Archipelago
Summary: Norway has one internal territory with limited Norwegian sovereignty—Svalbard.
The islands are, unlike the Norwegian Antarctic Territory, a part of the Kingdom of Norway and not a dependency.