Derbyshire

The henge monument at Arbor Low
Flooding in South Wingfield Derbyshire in 2012
A cross-section of northern Derbyshire, from west to east, showing the approximate structure of an eroded dome, with younger Coal Measure rocks to the east, and older limestone exposed in the centre
The rugged moorland edge of the southern Pennines at Kinder Downfall
The ruins of the Magpie Mine near Sheldon
Derbyshire parliamentary constituencies 2019 election result
County Hall, Matlock
One of many Victorian village schools in Derbyshire
County Cricket Ground, in Derby
The scenic Derbyshire that attracts tourists
Flag of Derbyshire

County in the East Midlands of England.

- Derbyshire
The henge monument at Arbor Low

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Leeds Town Hall

West Yorkshire

Metropolitan and ceremonial county in England.

Metropolitan and ceremonial county in England.

Leeds Town Hall
Geology of Yorkshire
Kirkstall Abbey, Kirkstall, Leeds
Population density in the 2011 census in West Yorkshire.
Bridgewater Place, a symbol of Leeds' growing financial importance.
Titus Salt's mill in Saltaire, Shipley is an UNESCO World Heritage Site
Leeds Bradford Airport
Elland Road, home to Leeds United
Harewood House
Sandal Castle
Royal Armouries Museum, Leeds: Looking up the main stairwell
Emley Moor Mast
Clarence Dock in Leeds

West Yorkshire consists of five metropolitan boroughs (City of Bradford, Calderdale, Kirklees, City of Leeds and City of Wakefield) and is bordered by the counties of Derbyshire to the south, Greater Manchester to the south-west, Lancashire to the west and north-west, North Yorkshire to the north and east, and South Yorkshire to the south and south-east.

Former weavers' cottages in Wardle. The development of Greater Manchester is attributed to a shared tradition of domestic cloth production, and textile manufacture during the Industrial Revolution.

Greater Manchester

Metropolitan county and combined authority area in North West England, with a population of 2.8 million; comprising ten metropolitan boroughs: Manchester, Salford, Bolton, Bury, Oldham, Rochdale, Stockport, Tameside, Trafford and Wigan.

Metropolitan county and combined authority area in North West England, with a population of 2.8 million; comprising ten metropolitan boroughs: Manchester, Salford, Bolton, Bury, Oldham, Rochdale, Stockport, Tameside, Trafford and Wigan.

Former weavers' cottages in Wardle. The development of Greater Manchester is attributed to a shared tradition of domestic cloth production, and textile manufacture during the Industrial Revolution.
Greater Manchester lies at the conjunction of the ancient county boundaries of Cheshire, Lancashire and the West Riding of Yorkshire.
The Greater Manchester Exhibition Centre (better known as the G-Mex centre and now rebranded as Manchester Central) was the converted former Manchester Central railway station in Manchester city centre used for hosting the county's cultural events.
Stockport Bus Station in 1988. Greater Manchester Transport (later GM Buses) operated bus services throughout the county, from 1974 to 1993.
GMC County Hall (now known as Westminster House) in Manchester housed the Greater Manchester County Council until its abolition in 1986.
An aerial photograph of Greater Manchester, looking west
The Greater Manchester Urban Area, as defined in 2001, highlighted in red against the boundaries of the Metropolitan County
A view over the borough of Tameside, towards Manchester city centre circa 2008.
Common cottongrass (Eriophorum angustifolium), seen here at Light Hazzles Reservoir near Littleborough, was voted the county flower of Greater Manchester in 2002
Andy Burnham has served as the inaugural Mayor of Greater Manchester since May 2017.
A bus stop in Denton bearing the logo of Transport for Greater Manchester (TfGM). TfGM is a functional executive body of the Greater Manchester Combined Authority and has responsibilities for public transport in Greater Manchester.
The population of Greater Manchester increased from around 328 thousand in 1801, to 2.68M in 2011, peaking in 1971 at 2.7M.
Much of Greater Manchester's housing stock consists of terraced houses constructed as low-cost dwellings for the populations of local factory towns.
Population density map
Oldham, painted during the Industrial Revolution by J. H. Carse. Many towns in Greater Manchester were built around the mills.
The Trafford Centre in Trafford is one of the largest shopping centres in the United Kingdom.
The M60 motorway, seen here at Failsworth, is an orbital motorway in Greater Manchester.
A Metrolink tram in Radcliffe, part of Greater Manchester's light rail network.
First Greater Manchester operate bus services in northern-Greater Manchester.
Old Trafford, home to Manchester United F.C.
Bolton Wanderers F.C. are based at the University of Bolton Stadium, in Horwich
The main entrance of Old Trafford Cricket Ground
The City of Manchester Stadium, the main venue of the 2002 Commonwealth Games and home to Manchester City F.C.
Eccles cake is a small round flaky pastry cake filled with currants, sugar and spice. It is native to Eccles.
The Imperial War Museum North in Trafford Park was designed by Daniel Libeskind, and is one of the Imperial War Museum's five branches.
The Lowry is a combined theatre and exhibition centre at Salford Quays, and is Greater Manchester's most visited tourist attraction.

Greater Manchester borders the ceremonial counties of Cheshire (to the south-west and south), Derbyshire (to the south-east), West Yorkshire (to the north-east), Lancashire (to the north) and Merseyside (to the west).

A High Peak panorama between Hayfield and Chinley

Peak District

Upland area in England at the southern end of the Pennines.

Upland area in England at the southern end of the Pennines.

A High Peak panorama between Hayfield and Chinley
Towns around the Peak District
Rivers around the Peak District
The Bugsworth Basin on the Peak Forest Canal
Thor's Cave seen from the Manifold Way
A view of the Edale valley from Mam Tor
Tunsted Quarry
Buxton Crescent and St Ann's Well
A well dressing at Hayfield
Paragliding from Mam Tor
Looking southeast over the Roaches and Hen Cloud
Map showing tunnels beneath the Peak District
Totley Tunnel on the Manchester to Sheffield line
Walkers above the Derwent Reservoir
Chatsworth House, the setting for a 2005 adaptation of Pride and Prejudice
Ladybower Reservoir in the Upper Derwent Valley, set location for The Dam Busters

Mostly in Derbyshire, it extends into Cheshire, Greater Manchester, Staffordshire, West Yorkshire and South Yorkshire.

Kinder Downfall

Kinder Scout

Kinder Downfall
Kinder Downfall frozen in winter
Edale Cross
Poor visibility near the summit
Kinder Downfall in strong westerly wind
Head of Grindsbrook
Panoramic view over Kinder Reservoir from Kinder
Ice climbers on Kinder Downfall
Ascending Jacob's Ladder towards Kinder Low trigpoint
Hags and groughs on the Kinder plateau
North flank of Kinder Scout taken from grid reference {{gbmappingsmall|SK075900}}

Kinder Scout is a moorland plateau and national nature reserve in the Dark Peak of the Derbyshire Peak District in England.

Northern England and adjoining areas, showing the general extent of the Pennines

Pennines

The Pennines, also known as the Pennine Chain or Pennine Hills, are a range of uplands running between three regions of Northern England: North West England on the west, and North East England and Yorkshire and the Humber on the east.

The Pennines, also known as the Pennine Chain or Pennine Hills, are a range of uplands running between three regions of Northern England: North West England on the west, and North East England and Yorkshire and the Humber on the east.

Northern England and adjoining areas, showing the general extent of the Pennines
Scenery in the Forest of Bowland
Stanage Edge in the Peak District
Croasdale Fell, Forest of Bowland
Kinder Downfall, a waterfall on Kinder Scout, Dark Peak
Limestone scenery: Thor's Cave, Staffordshire, from the Manifold Way. Limestone is common in the White Peak and Yorkshire Dales, making those areas distinct from other parts of the Pennines.
A prehistoric settlement on Harkerside Moor in Swaledale
The Pennines are traversed by several passes, mostly aligned with major rivers.
A train in British Rail blue about to enter the western portal of Woodhead 3, shortly before closure in 1981
The National Parks of England and Wales; two include areas of the Pennines, those marked as 7 and 1
England, Wales and Northern Ireland AONBs. The Pennines host three, with a large one protecting the North Pennines.
Shooting of red grouse is an economically important activity in the Pennines.

In 2004, George Redmonds reassessed this, finding that numerous respected writers passed over the origin of the mountains' name in silence even in works dedicated to the topological etymology of Derbyshire and Lancashire.

Filling bottles with water at St Ann's Well

Buxton

Filling bottles with water at St Ann's Well
Buxton Wells, from a 1610 map
Buxton in 1965 with shoppers and tourists filling Spring Gardens
Buxton Town Hall (on the right)
Buxton Crescent and St Ann's Well
Nocturnal view of the restored Buxton Thermal Baths, and Brian Clarke's modern stained glass canopy over the Cavendish Arcade
Corbar Hill and the Dome
Palace Hotel
Corbar Cross
Buxton Opera House
Buxton Raceway
View of Buxton from Solomon's Temple
Charles Henry John Chetwynd-Talbot, Vanity Fair, 1903
Herbert Eisner
Vera Brittain
Lloyd Cole, 2010
Mick Andrews, 1976

Buxton is a spa town in the Borough of High Peak, Derbyshire, England.

East Midlands

One of nine official regions of England at the first level of ITL for statistical purposes.

One of nine official regions of England at the first level of ITL for statistical purposes.

Royal Society of Wildlife Trusts, next to the Trent, and Waitrose, in Newark-on-Trent
Major Oak in Sherwood Forest; a traditional landmark of the north-east Midlands.
East Midlands Airport (looking west)
Air cargo aircraft at EMA
Newark North Gate railway station
The River Trent at the former High Marnham Power Station, next to the 1897 Fledborough Viaduct; the power station, built in 1959, was Europe's first 1000 MW coal power station (5 x 200 MW) and consumed coal from 17 collieries; the area is the largest collection of power stations in Europe, sometimes known as Kilowatt Valley
The Five Boroughs of the Danelaw
Steep Hill in Lincoln
Fox hunting is historically linked with the East Midlands
The innovative but aborted APT, designed in Derby, seen here in May 1980
How a zoom lens works; the principle was largely first invented in Leicester
Watford Gap services, Britain's first motorway service station, seen here in May 2006, which opened in November 1959
The De Veres Venues East Midlands Conference Centre at the University of Nottingham in September 2012
General election results in 2017
The jet engine was built and developed in the region
UK Coal (formerly RJB Mining) was based in Styrrup near Harworth. The north part of Derbyshire and Nottinghamshire used to have many coal mines, and the last two pits producing in Nottinghamshire were near Market Warsop and Ollerton
Swarfega was invented and is made by Deb in Belper
Worcester Bosch Thermokinetics makes its oil-fired and floor-standing boilers at its Danesmoor Works, off the A6175
Taylor, Taylor & Hobson 1925 advert
Caterpillar at Desford
National Grid plc has its main Ofsted-checked Eakring Training Centre in Nottinghamshire, where trainees learn how to build electricity pylons, including the new T pylon; National Grid has other training sites in Hollinwood and Hitchin
Dr Martens and many footwear companies are based in the south of the region, south-east of Wellingborough, at Wollaston
Headquarters of Next Retailing in July 2007 at Enderby, next to the M69; the largest company by turnover in the Midlands
Calders & Grandidge in the south of Boston are the UK's largest supplier of telegraph poles and wooden railway sleepers
John Smedley factory at Lea Mills: the oldest continuously-working factory in the world
Oxo factory (former Batchelors) on the Dukeries Industrial Estate in Worksop
Carlsberg Brewery at the A428/A508 junction in Northampton, on the former Phipps NBC site, also bottles Tuborg and San Migiuel; all modern lagers come from a Carlsberg yeast developed in 1883
Sir Owen Williams D10 building at Boots
The Eurofighter Typhoon is based at RAF Coningsby; it will eventually carry the active electronically scanned array (AESA) radar, which enables the radar to distinguish between targets and background noise, which earlier radars could not
An orangutan at Twycross Zoo
Sponne School, in Towcester
The University of Nottingham's Trent Building
Loughborough University is recognised for its green campus
University of Leicester
Brackenhurst Hall — Nottingham Trent University's agricultural college in Southwell
Brian Clough in April 1980
Leicester Riders arena in September 2016
The Waltham on the Wolds transmitter covers large parts of the region
Radio Northampton's Broadcasting House
British Parachute Schools at Langar

It consists of Derbyshire, Leicestershire, Lincolnshire (except North and North East Lincolnshire), Northamptonshire, Nottinghamshire and Rutland.

The three aligned henges of the Thornborough Henges complex

Henge

Internal ditch surrounding a central flat area of more than 20 m in diameter. There is typically little if any evidence of occupation in a henge, although they may contain ritual structures such as stone circles, timber circles and coves. Henge monument is sometimes used as a synonym for henge. Henges sometimes, but by no means always, featured stone or timber circles, and circle henge is sometimes used to describe these structures. The three largest stone circles in Britain (Avebury, the Great Circle at Stanton Drew stone circles, and the Ring of Brodgar) are each within a henge. Examples of henges without significant internal monuments are the three henges of Thornborough Henges. Although having given its name to the word henge, Stonehenge is atypical in that the ditch is outside the main earthwork bank.

Internal ditch surrounding a central flat area of more than 20 m in diameter. There is typically little if any evidence of occupation in a henge, although they may contain ritual structures such as stone circles, timber circles and coves. Henge monument is sometimes used as a synonym for henge. Henges sometimes, but by no means always, featured stone or timber circles, and circle henge is sometimes used to describe these structures. The three largest stone circles in Britain (Avebury, the Great Circle at Stanton Drew stone circles, and the Ring of Brodgar) are each within a henge. Examples of henges without significant internal monuments are the three henges of Thornborough Henges. Although having given its name to the word henge, Stonehenge is atypical in that the ditch is outside the main earthwork bank.

The three aligned henges of the Thornborough Henges complex
Avebury henge contains several stone circles
The Ring of Brodgar, Orkney is a possible area of origin for henges
Excavated henge ditch on Wyke Down (Dorset). The ditch was originally dug as a causewayed enclosure and may therefore not be a henge.
Maelmin Henge, constructed in 2000

At Arbor Low in Derbyshire, all the stones except one are laid flat and do not seem to have been erected, as no stone holes have been found.

River Trent

Third-longest river in the United Kingdom.

Third-longest river in the United Kingdom.

The Trent passes over a man-made waterfall in Hollin Wood just downstream from its source.
Swarkestone Bridge
Newark Castle
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Mercia Mudstone formation at Gunthorpe
Gravel extraction at Besthorpe
Trent Bridge flood marks
Flood marks at Girton showing the height of the 1795 flood and others
Newark Town Lock
Barges near Hoveringham in 1954
The aggregate carrier Tinno passing Keadby in 2002
The Trent Aegir seen from West Stockwith, Nottinghamshire, 20 September 2005
Fowlea Brook - once a very heavily polluted tributary of the Trent
Caddisfly larva, intolerant of pollution, are used as an indicator species in the Trent Biotic index
Grey heron fishing in the Trent
Fishing on the Trent near Ingleby by George Turner, 1850
Fishing on the Trent near Hazelford Ferry, 2009
Barton Ferry in 1949
Farndon ferry in 1907 showing the white frontage of the Britannia Inn
Ferry Bridge built in 1889, crosses the river between Stapenhill and Burton
Holme Pierrepont National Watersports Centre in Nottingham next to the River Trent

To the north-east of Burton the river is joined by the River Dove at Newton Solney and enters Derbyshire, before passing between the villages of Willington and Repton where it turns directly east to reach Swarkestone Bridge.

Lancashire County Palatine shown within England; this map does not correspond to the landholdings of the Duchy of Lancaster, however

Duchy of Lancaster

Private estate of the British sovereign as Duke of Lancaster.

Private estate of the British sovereign as Duke of Lancaster.

Lancashire County Palatine shown within England; this map does not correspond to the landholdings of the Duchy of Lancaster, however
The Duchy of Lancaster headquarters office in Lancaster Place, London. It flies the Duchy flag.

The duchy consists of 18433 ha of land holdings (including rural estates and farmland), urban developments, historic buildings and some commercial properties across England and Wales, particularly in Cheshire, Staffordshire, Derbyshire, Lincolnshire, Yorkshire, Lancashire and the Savoy Estate in London.