Descriptive notation

descriptive chess notationdescriptiveEnglish notation
Descriptive notation is a notation for recording chess games, and at one time was the most popular notation in English- and Spanish-speaking countries.wikipedia
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Algebraic notation (chess)

algebraic notationalgebraic chess notationalgebraic notation used for chess
It was used in Europe until it was superseded by algebraic notation, introduced by Philipp Stamma in 1737.
In English-speaking countries, the parallel method of descriptive notation was generally used in chess publications until about 1980.

Chess notation

notation0-11-0
Descriptive notation is a notation for recording chess games, and at one time was the most popular notation in English- and Spanish-speaking countries.
Descriptive chess notation was used in English- and Spanish-language literature until the late 20th century, but is now obsolete.

Chess

chess playerchess gamewestern chess
Descriptive notation is a notation for recording chess games, and at one time was the most popular notation in English- and Spanish-speaking countries.
Until about 1980, the majority of English language chess publications used a form of descriptive notation.

Philipp Stamma

Stamma
It was used in Europe until it was superseded by algebraic notation, introduced by Philipp Stamma in 1737.
Stamma's book introduced algebraic chess notation in an almost fully developed form before the now obsolete descriptive chess notation evolved.

Castling

castlecastledcastles
Castling: The notation O-O is used for castling and O-O-O for castling . The word "Castles" is sometimes used instead, particularly in older literature.
The notation for castling, in both the descriptive and the algebraic systems, is 0-0 with the rook and 0-0-0 with the rook; in PGN, O-O and O-O-O are used instead.

En passant

Special terms: Special indicators that are appended to the move include e.p. (en passant), ch or + (check), a question mark for a bad move, an exclamation mark for a good move, mate or ++ (checkmate), resigns, and draw.
In either algebraic or descriptive chess notation, en passant captures are sometimes denoted by "e.p."

Knight (chess)

knightknightsKnight's Move
Knight begins with the same letter as king, so it is abbreviated to either Kt (used in older chess literature) or N.
In algebraic notation, the usual modern way of recording chess games, the letter N stands for the knight (K is reserved for the king); in descriptive chess notation, Kt is sometimes used instead, mainly in older literature.

ICCF numeric notation

language-independent chess notationnumeric
In the back of the book, Staunton offers brief descriptions of long algebraic notation, noting its adoption by "Alexandre, Jaenisch, the 'Handbuch,' and in Germany generally", and of "Koch's Notation", now generally known as ICCF numeric notation.
Descriptive chess notation

Rules of chess

chessrulesstandard chess
Special terms: Special indicators that are appended to the move include e.p. (en passant), ch or + (check), a question mark for a bad move, an exclamation mark for a good move, mate or ++ (checkmate), resigns, and draw.
There are other systems such as ICCF numeric notation for international correspondence chess and the obsolete descriptive chess notation.

Howard Staunton

Staunton
By the time of Howard Staunton's The Chess-Player's Handbook (1847), a common first move for White was recorded as "P. to K's 4th.", which was later reduced to "P-K4".

Aaron Alexandre

AlexandreAaron (Albert) Alexandre
In the back of the book, Staunton offers brief descriptions of long algebraic notation, noting its adoption by "Alexandre, Jaenisch, the 'Handbuch,' and in Germany generally", and of "Koch's Notation", now generally known as ICCF numeric notation.

Carl Jaenisch

JaenischCarl Friedrich von Jänisch
In the back of the book, Staunton offers brief descriptions of long algebraic notation, noting its adoption by "Alexandre, Jaenisch, the 'Handbuch,' and in Germany generally", and of "Koch's Notation", now generally known as ICCF numeric notation.

Handbuch des Schachspiels

HandbuchBilguerBilguer handbook
In the back of the book, Staunton offers brief descriptions of long algebraic notation, noting its adoption by "Alexandre, Jaenisch, the 'Handbuch,' and in Germany generally", and of "Koch's Notation", now generally known as ICCF numeric notation.

FIDE

World Chess FederationFédération Internationale des ÉchecsAgon
FIDE stopped recognizing descriptive notation in 1981.

Chess Review

In 1944 Chess Review received many letters debating the change from Kt to N.

Queen (chess)

queenqueenschess queen
Thus in English descriptive notation the queen's file is named "Q" and the king's file is named "K".

King (chess)

kingkingschess king
Thus in English descriptive notation the queen's file is named "Q" and the king's file is named "K".

Promotion (chess)

promotionpromoteunderpromotion
Promotion: Parentheses are used to indicate promotion, with the piece resulting from the promotion in parentheses: P-R8(Q) or after a slash: P-R8/Q. Sometimes an equal sign is used: P-R8=Q.

Check (chess)

checkcheckschecking
Special terms: Special indicators that are appended to the move include e.p. (en passant), ch or + (check), a question mark for a bad move, an exclamation mark for a good move, mate or ++ (checkmate), resigns, and draw.

Question mark

????interrogation point
Special terms: Special indicators that are appended to the move include e.p. (en passant), ch or + (check), a question mark for a bad move, an exclamation mark for a good move, mate or ++ (checkmate), resigns, and draw.

Exclamation mark

exclamation point!exclamation marks
Special terms: Special indicators that are appended to the move include e.p. (en passant), ch or + (check), a question mark for a bad move, an exclamation mark for a good move, mate or ++ (checkmate), resigns, and draw.

Checkmate

matecheckmatingmates
Special terms: Special indicators that are appended to the move include e.p. (en passant), ch or + (check), a question mark for a bad move, an exclamation mark for a good move, mate or ++ (checkmate), resigns, and draw.

Draw (chess)

drawdrawsdrew
Special terms: Special indicators that are appended to the move include e.p. (en passant), ch or + (check), a question mark for a bad move, an exclamation mark for a good move, mate or ++ (checkmate), resigns, and draw.

Evergreen Game

The Evergreen game: Adolf Anderssen (White) versus Jean Dufresne (Black), Evans Gambit (ECO C52), Berlin 1852:

Adolf Anderssen

Anderssen
The Evergreen game: Adolf Anderssen (White) versus Jean Dufresne (Black), Evans Gambit (ECO C52), Berlin 1852: