Desktop publishing

DTPDesktop publishing softwaredigital typographydesktop publisherdesktop-publishingpage layout featurescomputerised typesettingcreated electronicallyDesigndesktop publication
Desktop publishing (DTP) is the creation of documents using page layout software on a personal ("desktop") computer.wikipedia
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WYSIWYG

What you see is what you getwhat-you-see-is-what-you-getWYSIWYG editor
Desktop publishing often requires the use of a personal computer and WYSIWYG page layout software to create documents for either large-scale publishing or small-scale local multifunction peripheral output and distribution — although a non-WYSIWYG system such as LaTeX could also be used for the creation of highly-structured and technically-demanding documents as well.

Electronic media

mediaelectronicelectronic communications
The content produced by desktop publishers may also be exported and used for electronic media.
This is in contrast to static media (mainly print media), which today are most often created electronically, but do not require electronics to be accessed by the end user in the printed form.

LaTeX

LaTeX2HTMLHlineLaTeX2e
Desktop publishing often requires the use of a personal computer and WYSIWYG page layout software to create documents for either large-scale publishing or small-scale local multifunction peripheral output and distribution — although a non-WYSIWYG system such as LaTeX could also be used for the creation of highly-structured and technically-demanding documents as well. (Desktop typesetting with only limited page makeup facilities had arrived in 1978–1979 with the introduction of TeX, and was extended in 1985 with the introduction of LaTeX.)
The typesetting system offers programmable desktop publishing features and extensive facilities for automating most aspects of typesetting and desktop publishing, including numbering and cross-referencing of tables and figures, chapter and section headings, the inclusion of graphics, page layout, indexing and bibliographies.

Page layout

layoutlayoutstemplate
Desktop publishing (DTP) is the creation of documents using page layout software on a personal ("desktop") computer.
With modern desktop publishing software such as flagship software Adobe Indesign and cloud-based Lucidpress, the layout process can occur entirely on-screen.

Adobe PageMaker

PageMakerAldus PageMakerPage Maker
This momentum was kept up by with the addition of PageMaker software from Aldus, which rapidly became the standard software application for desktop publishing.
Adobe PageMaker (formerly Aldus PageMaker) is a discontinued desktop publishing computer program introduced in 1985 by Aldus on the Apple Macintosh.

Aldus

Aldus CorporationAldus SoftwareAldus Prepress Group
This momentum was kept up by with the addition of PageMaker software from Aldus, which rapidly became the standard software application for desktop publishing.
Aldus Corporation was a software company that developed desktop publishing (DTP) software.

LaserWriter

Apple LaserWriterLaserWriter PlusLaserWriter II
The desktop publishing market took off in 1985 with the introduction in January of the Apple LaserWriter printer.
In combination with WYSIWYG publishing software like PageMaker, that operated on top of the graphical user interface of Macintosh computers, the LaserWriter was a key component at the beginning of the desktop publishing revolution.

Phototypesetting

cold typephototypesetterphotocomposition
The term "desktop publishing" is attributed to Aldus founder Paul Brainerd, who sought a marketing catchphrase to describe the small size and relative affordability of this suite of products, in contrast to the expensive commercial phototypesetting equipment of the day.
Phototypesetting is a method of setting type, rendered obsolete with the popularity of the personal computer and desktop publishing software, that uses a photographic process to generate columns of type on a scroll of photographic paper.

Word processor

word processingword processing softwareword processors
Desktop publishing methods provide more control over design, layout, and typography than word processing.
The functions of a word processor program fall somewhere between those of a simple text editor and a fully functioned desktop publishing program.

PostScript

PSPostScript 3.EPS, .PS
The LaserWriter and LaserWriter Plus printers included high quality, scalable Adobe PostScript fonts built into their ROM memory.
PostScript (PS) is a page description language in the electronic publishing and desktop publishing business.

Apple Inc.

AppleApple ComputerApple Inc
The Macintosh computer platform was introduced by Apple with much fanfare in 1984, but at the beginning, the Mac initially lacked DTP capabilities.
The outlook on Macintosh improved with the introduction of the LaserWriter, the first reasonably priced PostScript laser printer, and PageMaker, an early desktop publishing application released in July 1985.

Adobe Inc.

Adobe SystemsAdobeAdobe Systems Incorporated
Behind-the-scenes technologies developed by Adobe Systems set the foundation for professional desktop publishing applications.
In 1985, Apple Computer licensed PostScript for use in its LaserWriter printers, which helped spark the desktop publishing revolution.

Style sheet (desktop publishing)

style sheetsstyle sheetin desktop
PageMaker's pasteboard metaphor closely simulated the process of creating layouts manually, but Ventura Publisher automated the layout process through its use of tags and style sheets and automatically generated indices and other body matter.
A style sheet is a feature in desktop publishing programs that store and apply formatting to text.

Timeworks Publisher

Publish-It!KeyPublisherAcorn DTP
Desktop publishing moved into the home market in 1986 with Professional Page for the Amiga, Publishing Partner (now PageStream) for the Atari ST, GST's Timeworks Publisher on the PC and Atari ST, and Calamus for the Atari TT030.
Timeworks Publisher was a desktop publishing (DTP) program produced by GST Software in the United Kingdom.

Infographic

infographicsinformation graphicsgraph
The same DTP skills and software used for common paper and book publishing are sometimes used to create graphics for point of sale displays, presentations, infographics, brochures, business cards, promotional items, trade show exhibits, retail package designs and outdoor signs.
With vector graphics and raster graphics becoming ubiquitous in computing in the 21st Century, data visualizations have been applied to commonly used computer systems, including desktop publishing and Geographic Information Systems (GIS).

Atari ST

Atari STESTAtari 1040ST
Desktop publishing moved into the home market in 1986 with Professional Page for the Amiga, Publishing Partner (now PageStream) for the Atari ST, GST's Timeworks Publisher on the PC and Atari ST, and Calamus for the Atari TT030.
In some markets, particularly Germany, the machine gained a strong foothold as a small business machine for CAD and desktop publishing work.

Calamus (DTP)

Calamus
Desktop publishing moved into the home market in 1986 with Professional Page for the Amiga, Publishing Partner (now PageStream) for the Atari ST, GST's Timeworks Publisher on the PC and Atari ST, and Calamus for the Atari TT030.
Calamus is a desktop publishing application, built for the Atari ST computer.

Macintosh

Apple MacintoshMacMacs
The Macintosh computer platform was introduced by Apple with much fanfare in 1984, but at the beginning, the Mac initially lacked DTP capabilities.
In 1985 the combination of the Mac, Apple's LaserWriter printer, and Mac-specific software like Boston Software's MacPublisher and Aldus PageMaker enabled users to design, preview, and print page layouts complete with text and graphics—an activity to become known as desktop publishing.

PageStream

Publishing Partner
Desktop publishing moved into the home market in 1986 with Professional Page for the Amiga, Publishing Partner (now PageStream) for the Atari ST, GST's Timeworks Publisher on the PC and Atari ST, and Calamus for the Atari TT030.
PageStream (originally Publishing Partner) is a desktop publishing software package by Grasshopper LLC (United States), currently available for a variety of operating systems, including Windows, Linux, Macintosh, and Amiga.

GeoPublish

Software was published even for 8-bit computers like the Apple II and Commodore 64: Home Publisher, The Newsroom, and geoPublish.
geoPublish is a desktop publishing program designed by Berkeley Softworks for the GEOS environment.

QuarkXPress

Quark XpressQuarkQuark Immedia
, Apple computers remain dominant in publishing, even as the most popular software has changed from QuarkXPress — an estimated 95% market share in the 1990s — to Adobe InDesign.
QuarkXPress is a desktop publishing software for creating and editing complex page layouts in a WYSIWYG (What You See Is What You Get) environment.

Adobe InDesign

InDesignAdobe InDesign CS3Digital Publishing Suite
, Apple computers remain dominant in publishing, even as the most popular software has changed from QuarkXPress — an estimated 95% market share in the 1990s — to Adobe InDesign.
Adobe InDesign is a desktop publishing and typesetting software application produced by Adobe Systems.

Typewriter

typewriterselectric typewritertypewritten
Before the advent of desktop publishing, the only option available to most people for producing typed documents (as opposed to handwritten documents) was a typewriter, which offered only a handful of typefaces (usually fixed-width) and one or two font sizes.
The increasing dominance of personal computers, desktop publishing, the introduction of low-cost, truly high-quality laser and inkjet printer technologies, and the pervasive use of web publishing, e-mail and other electronic communication techniques have largely replaced typewriters in the United States.

Typesetting

typesettercompositortypeset
(Desktop typesetting with only limited page makeup facilities had arrived in 1978–1979 with the introduction of TeX, and was extended in 1985 with the introduction of LaTeX.)
In 1985, desktop publishing became available, starting with the Apple Macintosh, Aldus PageMaker (and later QuarkXPress) and PostScript.

TeX

TeX Users GroupTUGPlain TeX
(Desktop typesetting with only limited page makeup facilities had arrived in 1978–1979 with the introduction of TeX, and was extended in 1985 with the introduction of LaTeX.)
TeX's line breaking algorithm has been adopted by several other programs, such as Adobe InDesign (a desktop publishing application) and the GNU fmt Unix command line utility.