Detective Comics

Batman: Detective ComicsDetective Comics AnnualBatmanDetective Comics (2011)Guild of Detectivesnamesake comic book
Detective Comics is an American comic book series published by DC Comics.wikipedia
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DC Comics

DCDC EntertainmentDC Comic
Detective Comics is an American comic book series published by DC Comics.
The initials "DC" came from the company's popular series Detective Comics, which featured Batman's debut and subsequently became part of the company's name.

Action Comics

Action Comics WeeklyAction Comics AnnualSuperman: Action Comics
The series is the source of its publishing company's name, and—along with Action Comics, the series that launched with the debut of Superman—one of the medium's signature series.
The writer and artist had worked on several features for National Allied Publications' other titles such as Slam Bradley in Detective Comics and were asked to contribute a feature for National's newest publication.

Adventure Comics

New ComicsAdventureNew Adventure Comics
His second effort, New Comics #1, would be retitled twice to become Adventure Comics, another seminal series that ran for decades until issue #503 in 1983, and was later revived in 2009.
In its first era, the series ran for 503 issues (472 of those after the title changed from New Adventure Comics), making it the fifth-longest-running DC series, behind Detective Comics, Action Comics, Superman, and Batman.

Harry Donenfeld

Culture PublicationsDonenfeld
Wheeler-Nicholson was in debt to printing-plant owner and magazine distributor Harry Donenfeld, who was, as well, a pulp-magazine publisher and a principal in the magazine distributorship Independent News.
Harry Donenfeld (October 17, 1893 – February 1, 1965) was an American publisher who is known primarily for being the owner of National Allied Publications, which distributed Detective Comics and Action Comics, the originator publications for the superhero characters Superman and Batman.

Superman

Kal-ElClark Kent / SupermanClark Kent
The series is the source of its publishing company's name, and—along with Action Comics, the series that launched with the debut of Superman—one of the medium's signature series. Batwoman first appeared in Detective Comics #233 (July 1956) Since the family formula had proven very successful for the Superman franchise, editor Jack Schiff suggested to Batman co-creator Bob Kane that he create one for the Batman.
In 1936, he formed a joint corporation with Harry Donenfeld and Jack Liebowitz called Detective Comics, Inc., in order to release his third magazine, titled Detective Comics.

Comics anthology

anthologyanthology comicComic anthologies
Originally an anthology comic, in the manner of the times, Detective Comics #1 (March 1937) featured stories in the "hard-boiled detective" genre, with such stars as Ching Lung (a Fu Manchu-style "Yellow Peril" villain); Slam Bradley (created by Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster before their character Superman saw print two years later); and Speed Saunders, among others.

Penguin (character)

PenguinThe PenguinOswald Cobblepot
Several of Batman's best known villains debuted in the pages of Detective Comics during this era, including the Penguin in issue #58, Two-Face in issue #66, and the Riddler in issue #140.
The character made his first appearance in Detective Comics #58 (December 1941) and was created by Bob Kane and Bill Finger.

Crimson Avenger (Lee Travis)

Crimson AvengerLee TravisLee Walter Travis
The Crimson Avenger debuted in issue #20 (October 1938).
He first appeared in Detective Comics #20 (October 1938).

Two-Face

Harvey DentHarvey Dent / Two-FaceHarvey Dent/Two-Face
Several of Batman's best known villains debuted in the pages of Detective Comics during this era, including the Penguin in issue #58, Two-Face in issue #66, and the Riddler in issue #140.
The character was created by Bob Kane and Bill Finger and first appeared in Detective Comics #66 (August 1942).

Riddler

The RiddlerEdward NygmaEdward Nygma / The Riddler
Several of Batman's best known villains debuted in the pages of Detective Comics during this era, including the Penguin in issue #58, Two-Face in issue #66, and the Riddler in issue #140.
He first appeared in Detective Comics #140 (October 1948).

Robin (character)

RobinRobinsDick Grayson / Robin
1940). Issue #38 (April 1940) introduced Batman's sidekick Robin, billed as "The Sensational Character Find of 1940" on the cover and the first of several characters that would make up the "Batman Family".
The character's first incarnation, Dick Grayson, debuted in Detective Comics #38 (April 1940).

Speed Saunders

Cyril "Speed" SaundersSpeed Saunders, Ace Investigator
Originally an anthology comic, in the manner of the times, Detective Comics #1 (March 1937) featured stories in the "hard-boiled detective" genre, with such stars as Ching Lung (a Fu Manchu-style "Yellow Peril" villain); Slam Bradley (created by Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster before their character Superman saw print two years later); and Speed Saunders, among others.
Cyril "Speed" Saunders is a DC Comics character, first appearing in Detective Comics #1 (1937).

Slam Bradley

Biff BradleyMorgan, ShortyShorty Morgan
Originally an anthology comic, in the manner of the times, Detective Comics #1 (March 1937) featured stories in the "hard-boiled detective" genre, with such stars as Ching Lung (a Fu Manchu-style "Yellow Peril" villain); Slam Bradley (created by Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster before their character Superman saw print two years later); and Speed Saunders, among others.
Conceived by Malcolm Wheeler-Nicholson and developed by Superman creators Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster, the character first appeared in Detective Comics #1 (March 1937) and is depicted as a hard bitten, tough private eye who loves working for dames, but prefers the platonic company of his boy sidekick "Shorty" Morgan.

Barbara Gordon

BatgirlOracleBarbara
Schwartz, Gardner Fox, and Infantino introduced, from the William Dozier produced TV series, Barbara Gordon as a new version of Batgirl in a story titled "The Million Dollar Debut of Batgirl!"
The character subsequently made her first comic book appearance as Batgirl in Detective Comics #359, titled "The Million Dollar Debut of Batgirl!"

Clayface

Basil KarloEthan BennettClayface / Matt Hagen
Writer Bill Finger and artist Sheldon Moldoff introduced Bat-Mite in issue #267 (May 1959) and Clayface in #298 (Dec.
The original version of Clayface, Basil Karlo, first appeared in Detective Comics #40 (June 1940).

Batgirl

Bat-GirlBarbara Wilson / BatgirlBarbara Gordon / Batgirl
Schwartz, Gardner Fox, and Infantino introduced, from the William Dozier produced TV series, Barbara Gordon as a new version of Batgirl in a story titled "The Million Dollar Debut of Batgirl!"
The character debuted in Detective Comics #359 (January 1967) by writer Gardner Fox and artist Carmine Infantino, introduced as the daughter of police commissioner James Gordon.

Gardner Fox

Gardner F. FoxRod GrayNelson, Bruce
Schwartz, Gardner Fox, and Infantino introduced, from the William Dozier produced TV series, Barbara Gordon as a new version of Batgirl in a story titled "The Million Dollar Debut of Batgirl!"
Debuting as a writer in the pages of Detective Comics, Fox "intermittently contributed tales to nearly every book in the DC lineup during the Golden Age."

Talia al Ghul

TaliaMiranda TateMiranda Tate / Talia al Ghul
1970) and created Talia al Ghul in issue #411 (May 1971).
The character was created by writer Dennis O'Neil and artist Bob Brown, and first appeared in Detective Comics #411 (May 1971).

First appearance

first appeareddebutedfirst appears
Detective Comics #27 (March 1939 with a printed date of May 1939) featured the first appearance of Batman.
Shortly after the record-breaking million-dollar sale of Action Comics #1 in 2010, a copy of Detective Comics #27 featuring the first appearance of Batman was sold for $1,075,000 in a Heritage auction.

Independent News

Independent News CompanyIndependent News DistributorsIndependent News Company, Inc.
Wheeler-Nicholson was in debt to printing-plant owner and magazine distributor Harry Donenfeld, who was, as well, a pulp-magazine publisher and a principal in the magazine distributorship Independent News.
Wheeler-Nicholson produced two more titles to be handled by Independent News, New Comics and Detective Comics (which would later see the first appearance of Batman), now under the banner of Detective Comics Incorporated, in which Wheeler-Nicholson was forced to take Donenfeld and Liebowitz as partners.

Man-Bat

Kirk LangstromDr. Kirk LangstromBatman
Adams introduced the Man-Bat with writer Frank Robbins in Detective Comics #400 (June 1970).
The character made his first appearance in Detective Comics #400 (June 1970) and was created by Frank Robbins and Neal Adams in collaboration with editor Julius Schwartz.

Batwoman

Kate KaneKate Kane / BatwomanKathy Kane
Batwoman first appeared in Detective Comics #233 (July 1956) Since the family formula had proven very successful for the Superman franchise, editor Jack Schiff suggested to Batman co-creator Bob Kane that he create one for the Batman.
That year, Batwoman briefly took over as the lead character in Detective Comics, starting with #854.

Leslie Thompkins

Dr. Leslie ThompkinsDr. Lee ThompkinsLeslie "Lee" Thompkins
O'Neil and artist Dick Giordano created the Batman supporting character Leslie Thompkins in the story "There Is No Hope in Crime Alley" appearing in issue #457 (March 1976).
Created by writer Dennis O'Neil and artist Dick Giordano, she first appeared in Detective Comics #457 (March 1976).

Bill Finger

William Finger
Writer Bill Finger and artist Sheldon Moldoff introduced Bat-Mite in issue #267 (May 1959) and Clayface in #298 (Dec.
Finger wrote both the initial script for Batman's debut in Detective Comics #27 (May 1939) and the character's second appearance, while Kane provided art.

Jack Liebowitz

Jack S. LiebowitzJack
Wheeler-Nicholson took Donenfeld on as a partner in order to publish Detective Comics #1 through the newly-formed Detective Comics, Inc., with Wheeler-Nicholson and Jack S. Liebowitz, Donenfeld's accountant, listed as owners.
Wheeler-Nicholson brought out two comics, New Fun and New Comics—the former of historical note as the first modern comic book with all-original material, as opposed to newspaper-comic reprints with occasional, tangential new material—but it would be his third publication, Detective Comics, that would prove key.