Determiner

determinersDeterminer (linguistics)definite determinerdemonstrative determinersdet.determinativedetermineddeterminingDTquantifier
A determiner, also called a determinative (abbreviated ), is a word, phrase, or affix that occurs together with a noun or noun phrase and serves to express the reference of that noun or noun phrase in the context.wikipedia
193 Related Articles

Article (grammar)

definite articlearticlearticles
That is, a determiner may indicate whether the noun is referring to a definite or indefinite element of a class, to a closer or more distant element, to an element belonging to a specified person or thing, to a particular number or quantity, etc. Common kinds of determiners include definite and indefinite articles (like the English the and a or an), demonstratives (this and that), possessive determiners (my and their), quantifiers (many, few and several), cardinal numbers, distributive determiners (each, any), and interrogative determiners (which).
In English grammar, articles are frequently considered part of a broader category called determiners, which contains articles, demonstratives (such as "this" and "that"), possessive determiners (such as "my" and "his"), and quantifiers (such as "all" and "few").

Possessive determiner

possessive adjectivepossessivespossessive adjectives
That is, a determiner may indicate whether the noun is referring to a definite or indefinite element of a class, to a closer or more distant element, to an element belonging to a specified person or thing, to a particular number or quantity, etc. Common kinds of determiners include definite and indefinite articles (like the English the and a or an), demonstratives (this and that), possessive determiners (my and their), quantifiers (many, few and several), cardinal numbers, distributive determiners (each, any), and interrogative determiners (which). Possessive determiners modify a noun by attributing possession (or other sense of belonging) to someone or something, and usually reflect the noun's genitive case.
ktetic) constitute a sub-class of determiners which modify a noun by attributing possession (or other sense of belonging) to someone or something.

List of glossing abbreviations

abbreviatedglossing abbreviationglossing abbreviations
A determiner, also called a determinative (abbreviated ), is a word, phrase, or affix that occurs together with a noun or noun phrase and serves to express the reference of that noun or noun phrase in the context.

Demonstrative

demonstrative pronoundemonstrativesdemonstrative pronouns
That is, a determiner may indicate whether the noun is referring to a definite or indefinite element of a class, to a closer or more distant element, to an element belonging to a specified person or thing, to a particular number or quantity, etc. Common kinds of determiners include definite and indefinite articles (like the English the and a or an), demonstratives (this and that), possessive determiners (my and their), quantifiers (many, few and several), cardinal numbers, distributive determiners (each, any), and interrogative determiners (which). These classical interpretations of determiners map to some of the linguistic properties related to determiners in modern syntax theories, such as deictic information, definiteness and genitivity.
Demonstrative constructions include demonstrative adjectives or demonstrative determiners, which qualify nouns (as in Put that coat on); and demonstrative pronouns, which stand independently (as in Put that on).

Noun phrase

noun phrasesNPnominal phrase
A determiner, also called a determinative (abbreviated ), is a word, phrase, or affix that occurs together with a noun or noun phrase and serves to express the reference of that noun or noun phrase in the context.
In some more modern theories of grammar, noun phrases with determiners are analyzed as having the determiner as the head of the phrase, see for instance Chomsky (1995) and Hudson (1990).

Quantifier (linguistics)

quantifiersquantifierquantification
That is, a determiner may indicate whether the noun is referring to a definite or indefinite element of a class, to a closer or more distant element, to an element belonging to a specified person or thing, to a particular number or quantity, etc. Common kinds of determiners include definite and indefinite articles (like the English the and a or an), demonstratives (this and that), possessive determiners (my and their), quantifiers (many, few and several), cardinal numbers, distributive determiners (each, any), and interrogative determiners (which).
In linguistics and grammar, a quantifier is a type of determiner, such as all, some, many, few, a lot, and no, (but not specific numerals) that indicates quantity.

Definiteness

definiteindefinitedef.
These classical interpretations of determiners map to some of the linguistic properties related to determiners in modern syntax theories, such as deictic information, definiteness and genitivity.
For example, in English definiteness is usually marked by the selection of determiner.

Pronoun

pronounspronominalpronominal system
Most determiners have been traditionally classed along with either adjectives or pronouns, and this still occurs in classical grammars: for example, demonstrative and possessive determiners are sometimes described as demonstrative adjectives and possessive adjectives or as (adjectival) demonstrative pronouns and (adjectival) possessive pronouns respectively.
Certain types of pronouns are often identical or similar in form to determiners with related meaning; some English examples are given in the table on the right.

Part of speech

parts of speechclosed classword class
However, modern theorists of grammar prefer to distinguish determiners as a separate word class from adjectives, which are simple modifiers of nouns, expressing attributes of the thing referred to.
Commonly listed English parts of speech are noun, verb, adjective, adverb, pronoun, preposition, conjunction, interjection, and sometimes numeral, article, or determiner.

Phrase

phrasesTense phrasephrasal
A determiner, also called a determinative (abbreviated ), is a word, phrase, or affix that occurs together with a noun or noun phrase and serves to express the reference of that noun or noun phrase in the context.
For example, in some theories, a phrase such as the man is taken to have the determiner the as its head, rather than the noun man – it is then classed as a determiner phrase (DP), rather than a noun phrase (NP).

Inflection

inflectedinflectional morphologyinflectional
In some languages, the role of certain determiners can be played by affixes (prefixes or suffixes) attached to a noun or by other types of inflection.
The inflection of verbs is called conjugation, and one can refer to the inflection of nouns, adjectives, adverbs, pronouns, determiners, participles, prepositions and postpositions, numerals, articles etc., as declension.

Interrogative word

interrogative pronouninterrogativeinterrogative pronouns
That is, a determiner may indicate whether the noun is referring to a definite or indefinite element of a class, to a closer or more distant element, to an element belonging to a specified person or thing, to a particular number or quantity, etc. Common kinds of determiners include definite and indefinite articles (like the English the and a or an), demonstratives (this and that), possessive determiners (my and their), quantifiers (many, few and several), cardinal numbers, distributive determiners (each, any), and interrogative determiners (which).

Possessive

possessive pronounpossessive casepossessive pronouns
(The composition of this class may depend on the particular language's rules of syntax; for example, in English the possessives my, your etc. are used without articles and so can be regarded as determiners, whereas their Italian equivalents etc. are used together with articles and so may be better classed as adjectives.
Possessive determiners (adjectives) are used in combination with a noun, playing the role of a determiner or attributive adjective.

Noun

nounssubstantiveabstract noun
A determiner, also called a determinative (abbreviated ), is a word, phrase, or affix that occurs together with a noun or noun phrase and serves to express the reference of that noun or noun phrase in the context.
A noun phrase is a phrase based on a noun, pronoun, or other noun-like words (nominal) optionally accompanied by modifiers such as determiners and adjectives.

Grammatical case

casecasescase marking
Possessive determiners modify a noun by attributing possession (or other sense of belonging) to someone or something, and usually reflect the noun's genitive case.
In some languages, nouns, pronouns, adjectives, determiners, participles, prepositions, numerals, articles and their modifiers take different inflected forms, depending on their case.

Numeral (linguistics)

numeralnumeralsnumber names
Quantifiers only indicate a vague quantity of objects, not a specific number, such as twelve, dozen, first, single, or once, which would be considered numerals.
Some theories of grammar use the word "numeral" to refer to cardinal numbers that act as a determiner to specify the quantity of a noun, for example the "two" in "two hats".

Syntax

syntacticsyntacticalsyntactically
(The composition of this class may depend on the particular language's rules of syntax; for example, in English the possessives my, your etc. are used without articles and so can be regarded as determiners, whereas their Italian equivalents etc. are used together with articles and so may be better classed as adjectives.

Distributive pronoun

distributive
That is, a determiner may indicate whether the noun is referring to a definite or indefinite element of a class, to a closer or more distant element, to an element belonging to a specified person or thing, to a particular number or quantity, etc. Common kinds of determiners include definite and indefinite articles (like the English the and a or an), demonstratives (this and that), possessive determiners (my and their), quantifiers (many, few and several), cardinal numbers, distributive determiners (each, any), and interrogative determiners (which).

Determiner phrase

DPDP hypothesisDPs
Some modern grammatical approaches regard determiners (rather than nouns) as the head of their phrase and thus refer to such phrases as determiner phrases rather than noun phrases.
The head of a DP is a determiner, as opposed to a noun.

Swedish language

SwedishSwedish-languageSwedish-speaking
For example, definite articles are represented by suffixes in Romanian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, and Swedish.
They can double as demonstrative pronouns or demonstrative determiners when used with adverbs such as här ("here") or där ("there") to form den/det här (can also be "denna/detta") ("this"), de här (can also be "dessa") ("these"), den/det där ("that"), and de där ("those").

Grammatical modifier

modifiermodifiersqualifier
However, modern theorists of grammar prefer to distinguish determiners as a separate word class from adjectives, which are simple modifiers of nouns, expressing attributes of the thing referred to.

Determiner spreading

In linguistics, determiner spreading (DS), also known as Multiple or Double Determiners is the appearance of more than one determiner associated with a noun phrase, usually marking an adjective as well as the noun itself.

Syntactic category

syntactic categoriesfunctional categoriescategories
There are arguments that determiners are not a part of universal grammar and are instead part of an emergent syntactic category.

Specifier (linguistics)

specifierSpec
These grammar theories are either based on X-bar theory or descend from it, which requires that every noun has a corresponding determiner (or specifier).
In English, some example of specifiers are determiners such as the, a, this, quantifiers such as no, some, every, and possessives such as John’s and my mother’s, which can precede noun phrases.

X-bar theory

X-bar schemaX' theoryX-bar
These grammar theories are either based on X-bar theory or descend from it, which requires that every noun has a corresponding determiner (or specifier).
The word the is a determiner (specifically an article), which at first was believed to be a type of specifier for nouns.