Devil

the DevilRed DevilsdevilsDiablothe guy with the horns and pointed stickBlue DevildiabolicalLuciferadversaryBlue Devils
A devil is the personification of evil as it is conceived in many and various cultures and religious traditions.wikipedia
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Beelzebub

BeelzebulBelzebuthBaalzebul
It occurs historically in many contexts and cultures, and is given many different names — Satan, Lucifer, Beelzebub, Mephistopheles — and attributes: It is portrayed as blue, black, or red; It is portrayed as having horns on its head, and without horns, and so on.
In theological sources, predominantly Christian, Beelzebub is sometimes another name for the Devil, similar to Satan.

Mephistopheles

MephistoMephistopheleanMephistophelian
It occurs historically in many contexts and cultures, and is given many different names — Satan, Lucifer, Beelzebub, Mephistopheles — and attributes: It is portrayed as blue, black, or red; It is portrayed as having horns on its head, and without horns, and so on.
In the 1725 version, which Goethe read, Mephostophiles is a devil in the form of a greyfriar summoned by Faust in a wood outside Wittenberg.

Lucifer

DevilLouis CyphreMorning Star
It occurs historically in many contexts and cultures, and is given many different names — Satan, Lucifer, Beelzebub, Mephistopheles — and attributes: It is portrayed as blue, black, or red; It is portrayed as having horns on its head, and without horns, and so on.
An association of Isaiah 14:12–18 with a personification of evil, called the devil developed outside of mainstream Rabbinic Judaism in pseudepigrapha and Christian writings, particularly with the apocalypses.

Jeffrey Burton Russell

Jeffrey RussellJ. B. RusselJeffrey B. Russell
In his book The Devil: Perceptions of Evil from Antiquity to Primitive Christianity Jeffrey Burton Russell discusses various meanings, and difficulties that are encountered when using the term Devil.
He is most noted for his five-volume history of the concept of the Devil: The Devil (1977), Satan (1981), Lucifer (1984), Mephistopheles (1986) and The Prince of Darkness (1988).

Evil

malevolentbadwicked
A devil is the personification of evil as it is conceived in many and various cultures and religious traditions.
He wrote, "Seek out the society of your boon companions, drink, play, talk bawdy, and amuse yourself. One must sometimes commit a sin out of hate and contempt for the Devil, so as not to give him the chance to make one scrupulous over mere nothings ... "

Lake of fire

HellHell firelake of "fire and brimstone
Some modern Christians consider the devil to be an angel who, along with one-third of the angelic host (the demons) rebelled against God and has consequently been condemned to the Lake of Fire.
"And the devil that deceived them was cast into the lake of fire and brimstone, where the beast and the false prophet are, and shall be tormented day and night for ever and ever."

Satan

the DevilDevilLucifer
It occurs historically in many contexts and cultures, and is given many different names — Satan, Lucifer, Beelzebub, Mephistopheles — and attributes: It is portrayed as blue, black, or red; It is portrayed as having horns on its head, and without horns, and so on.
In the Septuagint, the Hebrew ha-Satan in Job and Zechariah is translated by the Greek word diabolos (slanderer), the same word in the Greek New Testament from which the English word "devil" is derived.

Fallen angel

Fallen AngelsfallFallen
Christianity describes him as a fallen angel who terrorizes the world through evil, is the antithesis of Truth, and shall be condemned, together with the fallen angels who follow him, to eternal fire at the Last Judgement.
In verses 7–9, Satan is defeated in the War in Heaven against Michael and his angels: "the great dragon was thrown down, that ancient serpent, who is called the devil and Satan, the deceiver of the whole world—he was thrown down to the earth, and his angels were thrown down with him".

Shaitan

demonsSatanshayatin
In Islam, the principle of evil is expressed by two terms referring to the same entity: Shaitan (meaning astray, distant or devil) and Iblis. Muslims held that the pre-Islamic Jinn, tutelary deities, became subject under Islam to the judgment of God, and that those who did not submit to the law of God are demons.
', singular: ''' are evil spirits, comparable to demons or devils, in Islamic theology and mythology.

Serpents in the Bible

serpentthe serpentsnake
Satan is often identified as the serpent who convinced Eve to eat the forbidden fruit; thus, Satan has often been depicted as a serpent.
Voltaire, drawing on Socinian influences, wrote: "It was so decidedly a real serpent, that all its species, which had before walked on their feet, were condemned to crawl on their bellies. No serpent, no animal of any kind, is called Satan, or Belzebub, or Devil, in the Pentateuch."

Iblis

DevilSatanShaitan
In Islam, the principle of evil is expressed by two terms referring to the same entity: Shaitan (meaning astray, distant or devil) and Iblis.
Another possibility is that it is derived from Ancient Greek διάβολος, which is also the source of the English word 'devil'.

Devil in Christianity

DevilOld NickSatan
In other, non-mainstream, Christian beliefs (e.g. the beliefs of the Christadelphians) the word "satan" in the Bible is not regarded as referring to a supernatural, personal being but to any 'adversary' and figuratively refers to human sin and temptation. Old Scratch, The Stranger, Old Nick: a colloquialism for the devil, as indicated by the name of the character in the story The Devil and Tom Walker
In mainstream Christianity, the Devil (or Satan) is a fallen angel who rebelled against God.

Old Scratch

Mr. ScratchScratchMr Scratch
Old Scratch, The Stranger, Old Nick: a colloquialism for the devil, as indicated by the name of the character in the story The Devil and Tom Walker
Old Scratch or Mr. Scratch is a nickname or pseudonym for the Devil.

Jinn

geniedjinnjinns
Muslims held that the pre-Islamic Jinn, tutelary deities, became subject under Islam to the judgment of God, and that those who did not submit to the law of God are demons. Asmodeus, Asmeday (Hebrew): King of genies (Shedim/Jinn); Aesma-daeva (Avestan): King of Nine Hells
In later revelations the demons and the jinn seems to be used interchangeably, here placing the jinn with the devil, against the angels and Muhammad.

Devil in popular culture

DevilSatanconcept of Satan
Devil in popular culture
The devil appears frequently as a character in works of literature and popular culture.

Goethe's Faust

FaustGoethe's ''FaustFaust I and II
Voland (fictional character in Goethe's Faust)
In contrast to Faust Part One, the focus here is no longer on the soul of Faust, which has been sold to the devil, but rather on social phenomena such as psychology, history and politics, in addition to mystical and philosophical topics.

Deal with the Devil

pact with the DevilFaustian bargainFaustian pact
Deal with the Devil
It was also believed that some people made this type of pact just as a sign of recognizing the devil as their master, in exchange for nothing.

Islam

MuslimMuslimsIslamic
Muslims held that the pre-Islamic Jinn, tutelary deities, became subject under Islam to the judgment of God, and that those who did not submit to the law of God are demons.
Depending on the object being a visible enemy, the Devil, and aspects of one's own self (such as sinful desires), different categories of jihad are defined.

Demiurge

demiurgicIaldabaothdemiurgus
These writings commonly refer to the Creator of the material world as "a demiurgus".
Opinions on the devil, and his relationship to the Demiurge, varied.

List of theological demons

demonic namesList of demonsTheological demons
This identifies only those thought of as the devil; List of demons has a more general listing.
Devil (Christian demonology)

Krampus

eponymous characterhuge demonKrampusz
Krampus, in the Tyrolean area also Tuifl.
Krampus carries chains, thought to symbolize the binding of the Devil by the Christian Church.

Yetzer hara

evil inclinationyeitzer harainclination
Iblis is merely a tempter, notable for inciting humans into sin by whispering into humans minds (waswās), akin to the Jewish idea of the Devil as yetzer hara.
Although certain ancient groups of Jews appear to have believed in the existence of supernatural evil, in particular fallen angels (as in the Dead Sea scrolls), the yetzer hara in non-apocryphal sources is presented as a personification of evil distinct from the supernatural Devil of traditional Christianity and Islam.

Theistic Satanism

devil worshipSatanismSatanist
Theistic Satanism
Quotations from Huysmans' Black Mass are also used in some Satanic rituals to this day, since it is one of the few sources that purports to describe the words used in a Black Mass. The type of Satanism described in Là-bas suggests that prayers are said to the Devil, hosts are stolen from the Catholic Church, and sexual acts are combined with Roman Catholic altar objects and rituals, to produce a variety of Satanism which exalts the Devil and degrades the God of Christianity by inverting Roman Catholic rites.

Asmodeus

AsmodaiAsmodayAshmodai
Asmodeus, Asmeday (Hebrew): King of genies (Shedim/Jinn); Aesma-daeva (Avestan): King of Nine Hells
Devil

Prince of darkness (Manichaeism)

Prince of Darkness
Prince of Darkness, the devil in Manichaeism
Devil