Devon heraldry

Devonshire gentrygentry families of Devonancient gentry families of Devonlanded gentry of Devonshireancient families of DevonshireDevonDevonshire gentry familygentryheraldryheraldry of Devonshire
The landed gentry and nobility of Devonshire, like the rest of the English and European gentry, bore heraldic arms from the start of the age of heraldry circa 1200-1215.wikipedia
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William Pole (antiquary)

PoleWilliam PolePole, Sir William
During his life Pole wrote many unpublished manuscripts containing his researches into the history and antiquities of Devon and the descents of that county's ancient families, their landholdings and heraldry.

Thomas Fones

FownesThomas Fownes
He was the first of his family to have settled in Devon, and his descendants rose to prominence as members of the Devonshire gentry and as Members of Parliament.

Painsford, Ashprington

Painsford
Painsford House was described as follows in 1850: "It was formerly much larger than at present, and its dilapidated chapel, though disused since the middle of the last century" (i.e. the 18th century), "still retains its pulpit, pews and altar -piece, and has a suit of armour hanging over the communion rails. The left wing of the house has a fine row of arches." In 2017 Painsford is a farmhouse much reduced in size displaying few signs of its former high status as a mansion of the Devonshire gentry.

Benjamin Incledon

Incledon
With an ample patrimony, he interested himself all his life in the ancient families of Devonshire.

Thomas Northmore (died 1713)

Thomas NorthmoreNorthmore
As a lawyer of the Inner Temple he acted as a business agent to various members of the Devonshire gentry, including Richard Coffin (1623-1700) of Portledge in the parish of Alwington, Devon, Sheriff of Devon in 1685, to whom he acted as Sheriff-Deputy.

Landed gentry

landownergentrylanded
The landed gentry and nobility of Devonshire, like the rest of the English and European gentry, bore heraldic arms from the start of the age of heraldry circa 1200-1215.

Nobility

noblemannoblenobles
The landed gentry and nobility of Devonshire, like the rest of the English and European gentry, bore heraldic arms from the start of the age of heraldry circa 1200-1215.

Devon

DevonshireDevon, EnglandCounty of Devon
The landed gentry and nobility of Devonshire, like the rest of the English and European gentry, bore heraldic arms from the start of the age of heraldry circa 1200-1215.

Heraldry

heraldicheraldistarms
The landed gentry and nobility of Devonshire, like the rest of the English and European gentry, bore heraldic arms from the start of the age of heraldry circa 1200-1215.

Victorian era

VictorianVictorian-eraVictorian period
The fashion for the display of heraldry ceased about the end of the Victorian era (1901) by which time most of the ancient armigerous families of Devonshire had died out, moved away or parted with their landed estates.

Earl of Devon

Earls of DevonEarl of Devon (1553)Earl of Devon (1141)
In 2015 a very few ancient families remain in the county represented by direct male descendants, most notably Courtenay of Powderham, Fulford of Fulford, Kelly of Kelly, Cruwys of Cruwys Morchard, Clifford of Chudleigh, Acland of Killerton and Broadclyst, Wrey of Tawstock, etc. A few ancient Devon estates are still owned by descendants via female lines, for example Castle Hill, Filleigh, Molland, Incledon, Braunton, Hall, Bishop's Tawton, Newnham Park, etc. In most cases the laws of English heraldry preclude the transmission of paternal armorials via a female heiress (other than in the form of quartering), thus most of these inheritors via female lines, generally deriving from the same pool of high-status English armigerous families, bring their own paternal heraldry, possibly previously foreign to Devon, to the estates inherited.

Manor of Powderham

Powderham
In 2015 a very few ancient families remain in the county represented by direct male descendants, most notably Courtenay of Powderham, Fulford of Fulford, Kelly of Kelly, Cruwys of Cruwys Morchard, Clifford of Chudleigh, Acland of Killerton and Broadclyst, Wrey of Tawstock, etc. A few ancient Devon estates are still owned by descendants via female lines, for example Castle Hill, Filleigh, Molland, Incledon, Braunton, Hall, Bishop's Tawton, Newnham Park, etc. In most cases the laws of English heraldry preclude the transmission of paternal armorials via a female heiress (other than in the form of quartering), thus most of these inheritors via female lines, generally deriving from the same pool of high-status English armigerous families, bring their own paternal heraldry, possibly previously foreign to Devon, to the estates inherited.

Great Fulford

FulfordFulford family
In 2015 a very few ancient families remain in the county represented by direct male descendants, most notably Courtenay of Powderham, Fulford of Fulford, Kelly of Kelly, Cruwys of Cruwys Morchard, Clifford of Chudleigh, Acland of Killerton and Broadclyst, Wrey of Tawstock, etc. A few ancient Devon estates are still owned by descendants via female lines, for example Castle Hill, Filleigh, Molland, Incledon, Braunton, Hall, Bishop's Tawton, Newnham Park, etc. In most cases the laws of English heraldry preclude the transmission of paternal armorials via a female heiress (other than in the form of quartering), thus most of these inheritors via female lines, generally deriving from the same pool of high-status English armigerous families, bring their own paternal heraldry, possibly previously foreign to Devon, to the estates inherited.

Cruwys Morchard

PennymoorWay VillageCruwys''' Morchard
In 2015 a very few ancient families remain in the county represented by direct male descendants, most notably Courtenay of Powderham, Fulford of Fulford, Kelly of Kelly, Cruwys of Cruwys Morchard, Clifford of Chudleigh, Acland of Killerton and Broadclyst, Wrey of Tawstock, etc. A few ancient Devon estates are still owned by descendants via female lines, for example Castle Hill, Filleigh, Molland, Incledon, Braunton, Hall, Bishop's Tawton, Newnham Park, etc. In most cases the laws of English heraldry preclude the transmission of paternal armorials via a female heiress (other than in the form of quartering), thus most of these inheritors via female lines, generally deriving from the same pool of high-status English armigerous families, bring their own paternal heraldry, possibly previously foreign to Devon, to the estates inherited.

Baron Clifford

Baron Clifford (1628)barony of CliffordClifford
In 2015 a very few ancient families remain in the county represented by direct male descendants, most notably Courtenay of Powderham, Fulford of Fulford, Kelly of Kelly, Cruwys of Cruwys Morchard, Clifford of Chudleigh, Acland of Killerton and Broadclyst, Wrey of Tawstock, etc. A few ancient Devon estates are still owned by descendants via female lines, for example Castle Hill, Filleigh, Molland, Incledon, Braunton, Hall, Bishop's Tawton, Newnham Park, etc. In most cases the laws of English heraldry preclude the transmission of paternal armorials via a female heiress (other than in the form of quartering), thus most of these inheritors via female lines, generally deriving from the same pool of high-status English armigerous families, bring their own paternal heraldry, possibly previously foreign to Devon, to the estates inherited.

Chudleigh

Chudleigh Grammar SchoolChudleigh, Devon
In 2015 a very few ancient families remain in the county represented by direct male descendants, most notably Courtenay of Powderham, Fulford of Fulford, Kelly of Kelly, Cruwys of Cruwys Morchard, Clifford of Chudleigh, Acland of Killerton and Broadclyst, Wrey of Tawstock, etc. A few ancient Devon estates are still owned by descendants via female lines, for example Castle Hill, Filleigh, Molland, Incledon, Braunton, Hall, Bishop's Tawton, Newnham Park, etc. In most cases the laws of English heraldry preclude the transmission of paternal armorials via a female heiress (other than in the form of quartering), thus most of these inheritors via female lines, generally deriving from the same pool of high-status English armigerous families, bring their own paternal heraldry, possibly previously foreign to Devon, to the estates inherited.

Acland baronets

Acland familySir John Dyke Acland, 8th BaronetSir John Acland, 3rd Baronet
In 2015 a very few ancient families remain in the county represented by direct male descendants, most notably Courtenay of Powderham, Fulford of Fulford, Kelly of Kelly, Cruwys of Cruwys Morchard, Clifford of Chudleigh, Acland of Killerton and Broadclyst, Wrey of Tawstock, etc. A few ancient Devon estates are still owned by descendants via female lines, for example Castle Hill, Filleigh, Molland, Incledon, Braunton, Hall, Bishop's Tawton, Newnham Park, etc. In most cases the laws of English heraldry preclude the transmission of paternal armorials via a female heiress (other than in the form of quartering), thus most of these inheritors via female lines, generally deriving from the same pool of high-status English armigerous families, bring their own paternal heraldry, possibly previously foreign to Devon, to the estates inherited.

Killerton

Killerton HouseKillerton Parkrun
In 2015 a very few ancient families remain in the county represented by direct male descendants, most notably Courtenay of Powderham, Fulford of Fulford, Kelly of Kelly, Cruwys of Cruwys Morchard, Clifford of Chudleigh, Acland of Killerton and Broadclyst, Wrey of Tawstock, etc. A few ancient Devon estates are still owned by descendants via female lines, for example Castle Hill, Filleigh, Molland, Incledon, Braunton, Hall, Bishop's Tawton, Newnham Park, etc. In most cases the laws of English heraldry preclude the transmission of paternal armorials via a female heiress (other than in the form of quartering), thus most of these inheritors via female lines, generally deriving from the same pool of high-status English armigerous families, bring their own paternal heraldry, possibly previously foreign to Devon, to the estates inherited.

Broadclyst

Broad Clyst
In 2015 a very few ancient families remain in the county represented by direct male descendants, most notably Courtenay of Powderham, Fulford of Fulford, Kelly of Kelly, Cruwys of Cruwys Morchard, Clifford of Chudleigh, Acland of Killerton and Broadclyst, Wrey of Tawstock, etc. A few ancient Devon estates are still owned by descendants via female lines, for example Castle Hill, Filleigh, Molland, Incledon, Braunton, Hall, Bishop's Tawton, Newnham Park, etc. In most cases the laws of English heraldry preclude the transmission of paternal armorials via a female heiress (other than in the form of quartering), thus most of these inheritors via female lines, generally deriving from the same pool of high-status English armigerous families, bring their own paternal heraldry, possibly previously foreign to Devon, to the estates inherited.

Wrey baronets

Sir Chichester Wrey, 3rd BaronetWreySir Bourchier Wrey, 4th Baronet
In 2015 a very few ancient families remain in the county represented by direct male descendants, most notably Courtenay of Powderham, Fulford of Fulford, Kelly of Kelly, Cruwys of Cruwys Morchard, Clifford of Chudleigh, Acland of Killerton and Broadclyst, Wrey of Tawstock, etc. A few ancient Devon estates are still owned by descendants via female lines, for example Castle Hill, Filleigh, Molland, Incledon, Braunton, Hall, Bishop's Tawton, Newnham Park, etc. In most cases the laws of English heraldry preclude the transmission of paternal armorials via a female heiress (other than in the form of quartering), thus most of these inheritors via female lines, generally deriving from the same pool of high-status English armigerous families, bring their own paternal heraldry, possibly previously foreign to Devon, to the estates inherited.

Tawstock

Tawstock CourtTawstock Church
In 2015 a very few ancient families remain in the county represented by direct male descendants, most notably Courtenay of Powderham, Fulford of Fulford, Kelly of Kelly, Cruwys of Cruwys Morchard, Clifford of Chudleigh, Acland of Killerton and Broadclyst, Wrey of Tawstock, etc. A few ancient Devon estates are still owned by descendants via female lines, for example Castle Hill, Filleigh, Molland, Incledon, Braunton, Hall, Bishop's Tawton, Newnham Park, etc. In most cases the laws of English heraldry preclude the transmission of paternal armorials via a female heiress (other than in the form of quartering), thus most of these inheritors via female lines, generally deriving from the same pool of high-status English armigerous families, bring their own paternal heraldry, possibly previously foreign to Devon, to the estates inherited.

Castle Hill, Filleigh

Castle HillFilleighCastle Hill House
In 2015 a very few ancient families remain in the county represented by direct male descendants, most notably Courtenay of Powderham, Fulford of Fulford, Kelly of Kelly, Cruwys of Cruwys Morchard, Clifford of Chudleigh, Acland of Killerton and Broadclyst, Wrey of Tawstock, etc. A few ancient Devon estates are still owned by descendants via female lines, for example Castle Hill, Filleigh, Molland, Incledon, Braunton, Hall, Bishop's Tawton, Newnham Park, etc. In most cases the laws of English heraldry preclude the transmission of paternal armorials via a female heiress (other than in the form of quartering), thus most of these inheritors via female lines, generally deriving from the same pool of high-status English armigerous families, bring their own paternal heraldry, possibly previously foreign to Devon, to the estates inherited.

Manor of Molland

MollandMolland ChampsonMolland-Champson
In 2015 a very few ancient families remain in the county represented by direct male descendants, most notably Courtenay of Powderham, Fulford of Fulford, Kelly of Kelly, Cruwys of Cruwys Morchard, Clifford of Chudleigh, Acland of Killerton and Broadclyst, Wrey of Tawstock, etc. A few ancient Devon estates are still owned by descendants via female lines, for example Castle Hill, Filleigh, Molland, Incledon, Braunton, Hall, Bishop's Tawton, Newnham Park, etc. In most cases the laws of English heraldry preclude the transmission of paternal armorials via a female heiress (other than in the form of quartering), thus most of these inheritors via female lines, generally deriving from the same pool of high-status English armigerous families, bring their own paternal heraldry, possibly previously foreign to Devon, to the estates inherited.

Incledon

Incledon, Braunton
In 2015 a very few ancient families remain in the county represented by direct male descendants, most notably Courtenay of Powderham, Fulford of Fulford, Kelly of Kelly, Cruwys of Cruwys Morchard, Clifford of Chudleigh, Acland of Killerton and Broadclyst, Wrey of Tawstock, etc. A few ancient Devon estates are still owned by descendants via female lines, for example Castle Hill, Filleigh, Molland, Incledon, Braunton, Hall, Bishop's Tawton, Newnham Park, etc. In most cases the laws of English heraldry preclude the transmission of paternal armorials via a female heiress (other than in the form of quartering), thus most of these inheritors via female lines, generally deriving from the same pool of high-status English armigerous families, bring their own paternal heraldry, possibly previously foreign to Devon, to the estates inherited.

Hall, Bishop's Tawton

Hall
In 2015 a very few ancient families remain in the county represented by direct male descendants, most notably Courtenay of Powderham, Fulford of Fulford, Kelly of Kelly, Cruwys of Cruwys Morchard, Clifford of Chudleigh, Acland of Killerton and Broadclyst, Wrey of Tawstock, etc. A few ancient Devon estates are still owned by descendants via female lines, for example Castle Hill, Filleigh, Molland, Incledon, Braunton, Hall, Bishop's Tawton, Newnham Park, etc. In most cases the laws of English heraldry preclude the transmission of paternal armorials via a female heiress (other than in the form of quartering), thus most of these inheritors via female lines, generally deriving from the same pool of high-status English armigerous families, bring their own paternal heraldry, possibly previously foreign to Devon, to the estates inherited.