A report on Dhaka

Ruins of Lalbagh Fort
Bengali woman wearing muslin in Dhaka in 1789
Dhaka, or Dacca, under British rule in 1861.
The Rajoshik sculpture, in front of the InterContinental Dhaka, displays a horse carriage that was once common in the city
Dhaka's central business district in the 1960s
Aerial view of Dhaka's main CBD in the 1980s, including the Jiban Bima Tower, Janata Bank Bhaban and Bangladesh Shilpa Bank Bhaban
Aerial view of Dhaka skyline, including the Independence Monument in Suhrawardy Udyan and the adjacent Ramna Park
The National Parliament House in Sher-e-Bangla Nagar
Nagar Bhaban is the seat of the Dhaka South City Corporation
Bangladesh Bank Building
City Centre Bangladesh (centre), Janata Bank Bhaban (left) and the office of Biman (right) in Motijheel CBD
Gulshan Avenue
SAARC Fountain in Kawran Bazar
Kawran Bazar Fish Market
Tomb of Kazi Nazrul Islam
The Ekushey Book Fair is the largest Bengali language book fair in Bangladesh
Dhaka has a popular style of mutton and potato biryani, known as the Kachi Biryani.
The headquarters of Bangladesh Television
The Teacher-Student Centre in Dhaka University, designed by Constantinos Apostolou Doxiadis, is one of the major student hubs of the city
The Asiatic Society Heritage Museum
Sher-e-Bangla National Cricket Stadium
Port of Dhaka
Trains in the Kamalapur railway station
Runway and apron area of the Shahjalal International Airport
Old High Court of Dhaka
thumb|Ahsan Manzil in Old Dhaka, a fine example of Indo-Saracenic architecture in the city
Khan Mohammad Mridha Mosque
Laila Centre (Citi offices) designed in the shape of a Rubik's Cube
Apartments in Dhaka
A building designed by Rafiq Azam
Chistia Palace is a modernist castle and one of the most famous private residences in Dhaka
Bait Ur Rouf Mosque designed by Marina Tabassum
Gulshan Society Mosque designed by Kashef Mahboob Chowdhury
A bridge in Dhaka Cantonment
Citibank Building
The headquarters of Bangladesh Television

Capital and largest city of Bangladesh, as well as the world's largest Bengali-speaking city.

- Dhaka

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Bangladesh

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Vanga Kingdom and erstwhile neighbours in ancient South Asia
7th century buddhist monastery. Known as Somapura Mahavihara
The Pala Empire was an imperial power during the Late Classical period on the Indian subcontinent, which originated in the region of Bengal.
The Sixty Dome Mosque is the largest mosque in the UNESCO protected Mosque City of Bagerhat.
Choto Sona Mosque, built during the reign of Sultan Alauddin Hussain Shah
Kusumba Mosque
Shipbuilding was a major industry in the Bengal Sultanate and later in Mughal Bengal
The Bibi Mariam Cannon (Lady Mary Cannon) was used by the Mughals to defend their bases.
Lalbagh Fort was the residence of the Mughal viceroy Shaista Khan.
Portuguese envoys (top left) at the imperial court of emperor Akbar. The Portuguese settlement in Chittagong flourished until the Mughals expelled the Portuguese in 1666.
Lord Clive meeting with Mir Jafar after the Battle of Plassey, which led to the overthrow of the last independent Nawab of Bengal
Founding conference of the All India Muslim League in Dhaka, 1906
The Dominion of Pakistan in 1947, with East Bengal its eastern part
Women students of Dhaka University marching in defiance of the Section 144 prohibition on assembly during the Bengali Language Movement in early 1953
Sheikh Mujibur Rahman (left) and Munier Chowdhury (centre) visiting Matiul Islam (right), an East Bengali student at Harvard during the late 1950s
Museum of Independence, Dhaka
Sheikh Mujib casting his ballot during a general election. He was given the popular title of Bangabandhu (Friend of Bengal) and is regarded as Bangladesh's founding leader.
Ziaur Rahman with members of the Dutch royal family in 1978
Muhammad Yunus (center) celebrating the Nobel Peace Prize in 2006 with his family in Oslo, Norway
Rohingya refugees entering Bangladesh from Myanmar
Physical map of Bangladesh
A Bengal tiger, the national animal, in the Sundarbans
Bangabhaban, the official residence of the President of Bangladesh, was built in 1905 during the British Raj for use by the Viceroy of India and the Governor of Bengal.
Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi during bilateral talks with Bangladeshi Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina at the Prime Minister's Office in Dhaka
The National Parliament of Bangladesh
The Supreme Court of Bangladesh
Map of Bangladesh UN Peacekeeping Force deployments
First South Asian Association for Regional Cooperation (SAARC) meeting in 1985 in Dhaka (l-r, top row: the presidents of Pakistan and the Maldives, the king of Bhutan, the president of Bangladesh, the prime minister of India, the king of Nepal and the president of Sri Lanka)
U.S. Special Presidential Envoy for Climate John Kerry meeting Bangladeshi Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina at her residence in Dhaka in April 2021
The Rapid Action Battalion has been sanctioned by the United States for human rights abuses
Historical development of GDP per capita
Construction of Padma Bridge, the longest bridge on the Ganges, by China Major Bridge Engineering Co. Ltd. The bridge was designed by AECOM.
Hotels and office blocks in an upmarket neighborhood of Dhaka
Paddy fields dominate the country's farmland. Bangladesh is a top global producer of rice (3rd), potatoes (7th), tropical fruits (6th), jute (2nd), and farmed fish (5th).
A Boeing 777 of the national flag carrier Biman Bangladesh Airlines
Coal and natural-gas fields in Bangladesh, 2011
In 2018, the first payload of SpaceX's Falcon 9 Block 5 rocket was the Bangabandhu-1 satellite built by Thales Alenia Space
The Charyapada scrolls are the oldest surviving text of the Bengali language. The photograph was taken at the Rajshahi College Library
Chakma alphabets are indigenous to the Chittagong Hill Tracts
Eid prayers for Muslims at Barashalghar, Debidwar, Comilla
Bangladeshis celebrating Pahela Baishakh as a mark of the beginning of Bengali new year
Literacy rates in Bangladesh districts
Faculty of Sciences at the University of Dhaka; The Curzon Hall
A Bangladeshi nurse in Kutupalong Refugee Camp
Historical development of life expectancy in Bangladesh
A preserved cloth of historic Bengali fine muslin, which is now extinct
Syed Mujtaba Ali
Muslim feminist Begum Rokeya and her husband in 1898
The 18th century terracotta Hindu Kantanagar Temple in Dinajpur
A Baul from Lalon Shah's shrine in Kushtia
Embroidery on Nakshi kantha (embroidered quilt), centuries-old Bengali art tradition
Traditional Bangladeshi Meal: Mustard seed Ilish Curry, Dhakai Biryani and Pitha
A Nouka Baich boat race
Bangladesh team on practice session at Sher-e-Bangla National Cricket Stadium
Anwar Hossain playing Siraj-ud-Daulah, the last independent Nawab of Bengal, in the 1967 film Nawab Sirajuddaulah
Beds of zamindars kept at the Bangladesh National Museum

Bangladesh ({{IPAc-en|%|b|{|N|g|l|@|"|d|E|S|,_|%|b|A:|N|-}}; বাংলাদেশ, ), officially the People's Republic of Bangladesh, is a country in South Asia. It is the eighth-most populous country in the world, with a population exceeding 165 million people in an area of either 148460 km2 or 147570 km2, making it one of the most densely populated countries in the world. Bangladesh shares land borders with India to the west, north, and east, and Myanmar to the southeast; to the south it has a coastline along the Bay of Bengal. It is narrowly separated from Bhutan and Nepal by the Siliguri Corridor; and from China by 100 km of the Indian state of Sikkim in the north. Dhaka, the capital and largest city, is the nation's economic, political, and cultural hub.

Clockwise from top left: Martyred Intellectuals Memorial; Bangladesh Forces howitzer; Lt. Gen. Amir Niazi signs the Pakistani Instrument of Surrender to Indian and Bangladeshi forces in the presence of Lt. Gen. Jagjit Singh; the.

Bangladesh Liberation War

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Revolution and armed conflict sparked by the rise of the Bengali nationalist and self-determination movement in erstwhile East Pakistan which resulted in the independence of Bangladesh.

Revolution and armed conflict sparked by the rise of the Bengali nationalist and self-determination movement in erstwhile East Pakistan which resulted in the independence of Bangladesh.

Clockwise from top left: Martyred Intellectuals Memorial; Bangladesh Forces howitzer; Lt. Gen. Amir Niazi signs the Pakistani Instrument of Surrender to Indian and Bangladeshi forces in the presence of Lt. Gen. Jagjit Singh; the.
A map of the British Raj in 1909 showing Muslim majority areas in green, including modern-day Bangladesh in the east and Pakistan in the west.
Language movement memorial
Sheikh Mujibur Rahman, the leader of East Pakistan, and later Bangladesh
The location of Bengali and Pakistani military units during Operation Searchlight, March 1971
An iconic poster by Quamrul Hassan on General Yahya Khan, representing the Pakistani military junta as demons.
The eleven sectors during the Bangladesh Liberation War
An advertisement for former Beatle George Harrison's "Bangla Desh" single, released in July 1971 to raise international awareness and funds for the millions of Bangladeshi refugees.
Illustration showing military units and troop movements during the war
Indira Gandhi
Allied Indian T-55 tanks on their way to Dacca
Pakistani Instrument of Surrender
Signing of Pakistani Instrument of Surrender by Pakistan's Lt.Gen. A. A. K. Niazi and Jagjit Singh Aurora on behalf of Indian and Bangladesh Forces in Dhaka on 16 Dec' 1971
Rayerbazar killing field photographed immediately after the war, showing dead bodies of intellectuals (image courtesy: Rashid Talukder, 1971)
Memorial for freedom fighters
French minister André Malraux vowed to fight alongside the Mukti Bahini in the Liberation War.
Senator Ted Kennedy led US congressional support for Bangladeshi independence
The Nixon administration was widely criticised for its close ties with the military junta led by General Yahya Khan. American diplomats in East Pakistan expressed profound dissent in the Blood Telegram.

The capital Dhaka was the scene of numerous massacres, including Operation Searchlight and the Dhaka University massacre.

East Pakistan

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Pakistani province established in 1955 by the One Unit Policy, renaming the province as such from East Bengal, which nowadays is split up between India and Bangladesh.

Pakistani province established in 1955 by the One Unit Policy, renaming the province as such from East Bengal, which nowadays is split up between India and Bangladesh.

East Pakistan was a key part of SEATO
Suhrawardy (middle) with US President Dwight D. Eisenhower and Secretary of State John Foster Dulles
Elizabeth II, seen here visiting Chittagong in 1961, was Pakistan's Queen until 1956.
Sheikh Mujibur Rahman announcing the Six Points
Surrender of Pakistan
Yahya Khan
Zulfikar Ali Bhutto in 1971
East and West Pakistan
The Kaptai Dam in 1965
President Ayub Khan (left) with Bengali industrialist Abul Kashem Khan (right) in Chittagong
Entrance to the Adamjee Jute Mills, the world's largest jute processing plant, in 1950
The Daily Ittefaq edited by Tofazzal Hossain was the leading Bengali newspaper in Pakistan
The first Bangladeshi flag was hoisted on 23 March 1971 across East Pakistan, as a protest on Republic Day
The Indo-East Pakistan border as shown by the U.S. Army, c. 1960.
Central business district in Dacca, 1960s
Chittagong Port in 1960
Baitul Mukarram Market Area, Dacca, 1967
Pakistani banknotes included Bengali script until 1971
A poster of the East Pakistan Helicopter Service
Third president of Pakistan, Yahya Khan with Richard Nixon in 1970

Dacca was declared as the second capital of Pakistan and planned as the home of the national parliament.

Shahbag

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Location of Shahbag in Dhaka
Mosque/Tomb of Khwaja Shahbaz, built in 1679
Elephants being ridden through Ramna Gate, Race Course, 1875
Water tower in Shahbagh gardens, 1904
Double deckers at Shahbag, one of the busiest bus-ports in the city
Israt Manzil in the early 20th century
The Jalsaghar in early 20th century
Sri Anandamoyi Ma, early 20th-century Hindu religious figure
Mangal Shobhajatra on Pohela Baishakh

Shahbag or Shahbagh (also Shahbaugh, শাহবাগ, ) is a major neighbourhood and a police precinct or thana in Dhaka, the capital and largest city of Bangladesh.

Dhaka City across Buriganga River in a 1861 painting

Old Dhaka

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Dhaka City across Buriganga River in a 1861 painting
Dhaka City across Buriganga River in a 1861 painting
Ahsan Manzil, the abode of Dhaka Nawabs.
Lalbagh Kella
Dhakeshwari Temple
Taara Masjid, Armanitola
Northbrook Hall
Lalbagh Qila
Beauty Boarding
Armenian Church
Traditional Iftaari of Chowkbazar
Sheek Kebab
Bakarkhani
Pohela Boishakh in Bahadur Shah Park
Shakrain (Poush Sangkranti)
Traditional TomTom
Main Entrance of Mitford Hospital
A building of Old Dhaka
Sadarghat, Part of Old Dhaka
Alley in Old Dhaka
Dhaka Central Jail, Old Dhaka
Rose Garden Palace

Old Dhaka (পুরান ঢাকা) is a term used to refer to the historic old city of Dhaka, the capital of Bangladesh.

Ahsan Manzil, seat of the Nawab of Dhaka

Nawab of Dhaka

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Ahsan Manzil, seat of the Nawab of Dhaka
Nawab's Dilkusha Garden, Dhaka (1904) by Fritz Kapp.
Ahsan Manzil palace in 1965
Nawab Sir Salimullah celebrating the Eid Day with his family at the Ahsan Manzil palace

The Nawab of Dhaka (Bengali: "ঢাকার নবাব"), originally spelt in English Nawab of Dacca, was the title of the head of largest Muslim zamindar in British Bengal and Assam, based in present-day Dhaka, Bangladesh.

Bengal Subah

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The largest subdivision of the Mughal Empire (and later an independent state under the Nawabs of Bengal) encompassing much of the Bengal region, which includes modern Bangladesh and the Indian state of West Bengal, Indian state of Bihar, Jharkhand, Odissa between the 16th and 18th centuries.

The largest subdivision of the Mughal Empire (and later an independent state under the Nawabs of Bengal) encompassing much of the Bengal region, which includes modern Bangladesh and the Indian state of West Bengal, Indian state of Bihar, Jharkhand, Odissa between the 16th and 18th centuries.

Map of Bengal Subah
Dutch East India Company factory in Hugli-Chuchura, Bengal by Hendrik van Schuylenburgh (c. 1665)
The Mughal absorption of Bengal initially progressed during the reigns of the first two emperors Babur and Humayun
Akbar developed the modern Bengali calendar
Dhaka, the capital of Bengal, was named Jahangir Nagar in honor of the fourth Mughal monarch Jahangir
Robert Clive meets Mir Jafar at the Battle of Plassey in 1757
Shah Alam II granting Robert Clive the "Diwani rights of Bengal, Behar and Odisha" in return for the annexed territories of the Nawab of Awadh after the Battle of Buxar, on 12 August 1765 at the Benares.
Mobile artillery battries, loyal to the Nawab of Bengal.
Bengali curved roofs were copied by Mughal architects in other parts of the empire, such as in the Naulakha Pavilion in Lahore
Nimtoli Deuri, named after the neem tree, is now a property of the Asiatic Society of Bangladesh, situated in Dhaka, Bangladesh is now a Heritage Museum.
A riverside mosque in Mughal Dhaka
The Armenian church and cemetery in Dhaka
Maddison's estimates of global GDP, China and India being the most powerful until the 18th century.
A 3D reconstruction of the Bara Katra in modern-day Dhaka
A woman in Dhaka clad in fine Bengali muslin, 18th century
Munim Khan (seated, right), the first Viceroy of Mughal Bengal (1574–1575)
Man Singh I, the Rajput Viceroy of Bengal (1594–1606)
Shaista Khan, Viceroy (1664–1688)
Viceroy Muhammad Azam Shah (1678–1679), later Mughal Emperor
Viceroy Azim-us-Shan (1697–1712), later Mughal Emperor
Daud Khan receives a robe from Munim Khan
Bibi Mariam Cannon
Jahan Kosha Cannon
Battle of Chittagong in 1666 between the Mughals and Arakanese
Jamdani muslin is a legacy of Mughal Bengal
Murshidabad-style painting of a woman playing the sitar
Scroll painting of a Ghazi riding a Bengal tiger

The Mughals built a new imperial metropolis in Dhaka from 1610, with well-developed fortifications, gardens, tombs, palaces and mosques.

Eastern Bengal and Assam

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Administrative subdivision of the British India between 1905 and 1912.

Administrative subdivision of the British India between 1905 and 1912.

Eastern Bengal and Assam in 1907, bordered by British Indian Bengal and Bihar, Nepal, Bhutan, British Burma and Tibet
The British East India Company annexed Bengal in 1765, and Assam in 1838
Eastern Bengal and Assam in 1907, bordered by British Indian Bengal and Bihar, Nepal, Bhutan, British Burma and Tibet
Lord Curzon initiated the creation of Eastern Bengal and Assam
Founding conference of the All India Muslim League in Dacca, 1906
An example of European-Mughal architecture introduced in Dacca after the First Partition of Bengal
An illustration of tea cultivation in Eastern Bengal and Assam
A 19th century train preserved at the Chittagong Central Railway Building
Ferries were an important mode of provincial transport. Seen here is the arrival of the British Viceroy in Dacca by a fleet of steamers in 1908

Headquartered in the city of Dacca, it covered territories in what are now Bangladesh, Northeast India and Northern West Bengal.

1909 Map of India, showing British India in two shades of pink and Princely states in yellow

British Raj

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Founding member of the League of Nations, a participating nation in the Summer Olympics in 1900, 1920, 1928, 1932, and 1936, and a founding member of the United Nations in San Francisco in 1945.

Founding member of the League of Nations, a participating nation in the Summer Olympics in 1900, 1920, 1928, 1932, and 1936, and a founding member of the United Nations in San Francisco in 1945.

1909 Map of India, showing British India in two shades of pink and Princely states in yellow
1909 Map of India, showing British India in two shades of pink and Princely states in yellow
Viceroy Curzon (1899–1905). He promoted many reforms but his partitioning of Bengal into Muslim and Hindu provinces caused outrage.
Cover of a 1909 issue of the Tamil magazine Vijaya showing "Mother India" with her diverse progeny and the rallying cry "Vande Mataram"
Sepoy Khudadad Khan, the first Indian to be awarded the Victoria Cross, the British Empire's highest war-time medal for gallantry. Khan, from Chakwal District, Punjab (present-day Pakistan) was fighting on the Western Front in 1914.
Indian medical orderlies attending to wounded soldiers with the Mesopotamian Expeditionary Force in Mesopotamia during World War I
Muhammad Ali Jinnah, seated, third from the left, was a supporter of the Lucknow Pact, which, in 1916, ended the three-way rift between the Extremists, the Moderates and the League.
Mahatma Gandhi (seated in carriage, on the right, eyes downcast, with black flat-top hat) receiving a big welcome in Karachi in 1916 after his return to India from South Africa
Gandhi at the time of the Kheda Satyagraha, 1918
Sidney Rowlatt, the British judge under whose chairmanship the Rowlatt Committee recommended stricter anti-sedition laws
Headlines about the Rowlatt Bills (1919) from a nationalist newspaper in India. Although all non-official Indians on the Legislative Council voted against the Rowlatt Bills, the government was able to force their passage by using its majority.
The Jallianwala Bagh in 1919, a few months after the massacre which had occurred on 13 April
A. K. Fazlul Huq, known as the Sher-e-Bangla or Tiger of Bengal, was the first elected Premier of Bengal, leader of the K. P. P. and an important ally of the All India Muslim League.
Subhas Chandra Bose (second from left) with Heinrich Himmler (right), 1942
The series of stamps, "Victory", issued by the Government of India to commemorate the allied victory in World War II
Members of the 1946 Cabinet Mission to India meeting Muhammad Ali Jinnah. Far left is Lord Pethick Lawrence; far right is Sir Stafford Cripps
Percentage of Hindus by district, 1909
Percentage of Muslims by district, 1909
Sir Charles Wood (1800–1885) was President of the Board of Control of the East India Company from 1852 to 1855; he shaped British education policy in India, and was Secretary of State for India from 1859 to 1866.
Lord Canning, the last governor-general of India under Company rule and the first viceroy of India under Crown rule
Lord Salisbury was Secretary of State for India from 1874 to 1878.
Elephant Carriage of the Maharaja of Rewa, Delhi Durbar of 1903
One Mohur depicting Queen Victoria (1862)
The railway network of India in 1871, all major cities, Calcutta, Bombay and Madras, as well as Delhi are connected
The railway network of India in 1909, when it was the fourth largest railway network in the world
"The most magnificent railway station in the world." says the caption of the stereographic tourist picture of Victoria Terminus, Bombay, which was completed in 1888
The Queen's Own Madras Sappers and Miners, 1896
The global contribution to world's GDP by major economies from 1 CE to 2003 CE according to Angus Maddison's estimates. Up until the early 18th century, China and India were the two largest economies by GDP output.
The 1921 Census of British India shows 69 million Muslims, 217 million Hindus out of a total population of 316 million.
Child who starved to death during the Bengal famine of 1943
The University of Lucknow, founded by the British in 1867
The University of Calcutta, established in 1857, is one of the three oldest modern state universities in India.
St. Paul's Cathedral was built in 1847 and served as the chair of the Bishop of Calcutta, who served as the metropolitan of the Church of India, Burma and Ceylon.
The British Indian Empire and surrounding countries in 1909
Lakshmibai, the Rani of Jhansi, one of the principal leaders of the Indian Rebellion of 1857, who earlier had lost her kingdom as a result of Lord Dalhousie's Doctrine of Lapse
Sir Syed Ahmed Khan, founder of the Muhammadan Anglo-Oriental College, later the Aligarh Muslim University, wrote one of the early critiques, The Causes of the Indian Mutiny.
An 1887 souvenir portrait of Queen Victoria as Empress of India, 30 years after the war
Viceroy, Lord Canning, meets the ruler of the princely state of Jammu and Kashmir, Ranbir Singh, 9 March 1860. Kashmir, like Hyderabad, Mysore, and the states of the Rajputana, supported the British during the Rebellion of 1857.
1909 Prevailing Religions, map of British India, 1909, showing the majority religions based on the Census of 1901
Hakim Ajmal Khan, a founder of the Muslim League, became the president of the Indian National Congress in 1921.
Lord Minto, the Conservative viceroy met with the Muslim delegation in June 1906. The Minto-Morley Reforms of 1909 called for separate Muslim electorates.
Mahatma Gandhi with Annie Besant en route to a meeting in Madras in September 1921. Earlier, in Madurai, on 21 September 1921, Gandhi had adopted the loin-cloth for the first time as a symbol of his identification with India's poor.
An early 1920s poster advertising a Congress non-co-operation "Public Meeting" and a "Bonfire of Foreign Clothes" in Bombay, and expressing support for the "Karachi Khilafat Conference"
Hindus and Muslims, displaying the flags of both the Indian National Congress and the Muslim League, collecting clothes to be later burnt as a part of the non-cooperation movement initiated by Gandhi
Photograph of the staff and students of the National College, Lahore, founded in 1921 by Lala Lajpat Rai for students preparing for the non-co-operation movement. Standing, fourth from the right, is future revolutionary Bhagat Singh.
British prime minister, Ramsay MacDonald, three places to the right of Gandhi (to the viewer's left) at the 2nd Round Table Conference. Samuel Hoare is two places to Gandhi's right. Foreground, fourth from left, is B. R. Ambedkar representing the "Depressed Classes"
A second-day cancellation of the series "Inauguration of New Delhi", 27 February 1931, commemorating the new city designed by Sir Edwin Lutyens and Sir Herbert Baker
A first-day cover issued on 1 April 1937 commemorating the separation of Burma from the British Indian Empire
Mahatma Gandhi (centre-right) and Rajendra Prasad (centre-left) on their way to meet the viceroy, Lord Linlithgow, on 13 October 1939, after the outbreak of World War II
Chaudhari Khaliquzzaman (left) seconding the 1940 Lahore Resolution of the Muslim League with Jinnah (right) presiding, and Liaquat Ali Khan (centre)
Newly arrived Indian troops on the quayside in Singapore, November 1941
Indian Army troops in action during Operation Crusader in the Western Desert Campaign in North Africa in November/December 1941
Two silver one rupee coins used in India during the British Raj, showing Victoria, Queen, 1862 (left) and Victoria, Empress, 1886 (right)
Silver one rupee coins showing Edward VII, King-Emperor, 1903 (left) and 1908 (right)
Silver one rupee coins used in India during the British Raj, showing George V, King-Emperor, 1913 (left) and 1919 (right)
One rupee coins showing George VI, King-Emperor, 1940 (left) and just before India's independence in 1947 (right){{efn|The only other emperor during this period, Edward VIII (reigned January to December 1936), did not issue any Indian currency under his name.}}
The proclamation to the "Princes, Chiefs, and People of India," issued by Queen Victoria on November 1, 1858.
The Agra canal ({{circa|1873}}), a year from completion, was closed to navigation in 1904 to increase irrigation during a famine.
Lord Ripon, the Liberal Viceroy of India, who instituted the Famine Code. 1880
Allan Octavian Hume (1829-1912), who proposed the idea of the Indian National Congress in a letter to graduates of Calcutta University.
Congress, Bombay, December 28, 1885. Third row (middle) (l. to r.) Dadabhai Naoroji, Hume, W. C. Bonerjee, and Pherozeshah Mehta.
Poverty and the Un-British Rule in India, 1901, by Naoroji, Member, British Parliament (1892–1895), and Congress president (1886, 1893, 1906).
Mehta, lawyer, businessman, and president of the sixth session of the Indian National Congress in 1890.
Congress moderate Sir Surendranath Banerjee led the opposition with the Swadeshi movement.
Annie Besant shown with the Theosophists in Adyar, Madras in 1912 four years before she founded an Indian Home Rule League.{{efn|Seated l. to r. are: Jiddhu Krisnamurthi, Besant, and Charles Webster Leadbeater.}}

This led, in December 1906, to the founding of the All-India Muslim League in Dacca.

Sheikh Mujibur Rahman in 1950

Sheikh Mujibur Rahman

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Bangladeshi politician, statesman and Founding Father of Bangladesh who served as the first President and later as the Prime Minister of Bangladesh from April 1971 until his assassination in August 1975.

Bangladeshi politician, statesman and Founding Father of Bangladesh who served as the first President and later as the Prime Minister of Bangladesh from April 1971 until his assassination in August 1975.

Sheikh Mujibur Rahman in 1950
The house where Mujib was born in Tungipara
Mujib (right) with Huseyn Shaheed Suhrawardy in 1949
Rally on 21 February 1954 by Moulana Abdul Hamid Khan Bhashani and Mujibur Rahman marching barefoot to pay their tributes to the Language Movement Martyrs.
Mujib announcing the Six Points in Lahore, 1966
Mujib campaigning in East Pakistan before the 1970 general election
Mujib, Prime Minister of Bangladesh, with U.S. President Gerald Ford in 1974
Tomb of Mujibur in Gopalganj
The Bangabandhu Square Monument
Mujibur on a 2020 stamp of India

After Bangladesh's independence, Mujib was released from Pakistani custody due to international pressure and returned to Dhaka in January 1972 after a short visit to Britain and India.