Dial-up Internet access

dial-updialupdial-up accessdial-up Internetdial-up connectiondial upDial-up networkingDial-up Internet servicedialup connectiondial-up Internet connection
Dial-up Internet access is a form of Internet access that uses the facilities of the public switched telephone network (PSTN) to establish a connection to an Internet service provider (ISP) by dialing a telephone number on a conventional telephone line.wikipedia
446 Related Articles

Internet access

broadband internetbroadband Internet accessbroadband
Dial-up Internet access is a form of Internet access that uses the facilities of the public switched telephone network (PSTN) to establish a connection to an Internet service provider (ISP) by dialing a telephone number on a conventional telephone line.
In 1995, only .04 percent of the world's population had access, with well over half of those living in the United States, and consumer use was through dial-up.

Usenet

netnewsnewsnewsgroup
In 1979, Tom Truscott and Steve Bellovin, graduates of Duke University, created an early predecessor to dial-up Internet access called the USENET.
It was developed from the general-purpose Unix-to-Unix Copy (UUCP) dial-up network architecture.

Internet service provider

ISPInternet service providersISPs
Dial-up Internet access is a form of Internet access that uses the facilities of the public switched telephone network (PSTN) to establish a connection to an Internet service provider (ISP) by dialing a telephone number on a conventional telephone line.
These companies generally offered dial-up connections, using the public telephone network to provide last-mile connections to their customers.

Broadband

Broadband Servicesbroad-bandBroadband Internet
After the introduction of commercial broadband in the late 1990s, dial-up Internet access became less popular in the mid-2000s. Because telephone access is widely available, dial-up is often the only choice available for rural or remote areas, where broadband installations are not prevalent due to low population density and high infrastructure cost.
In the context of Internet access, broadband is used to mean any high-speed Internet access that is always on and faster than dial-up access over traditional analog or ISDN PSTN services.

Modem

modemsdial-up modem56k modem
Dial-up connections use modems to decode audio signals into data to send to a router or computer, and to encode signals from the latter two devices to send to another modem.
The first is the ability for users who have call waiting to put their dial-up Internet connection on hold for extended periods of time while they answer a call.

Pair gain

Pair gain systemsubscriber carrier
Other factors such as long loops, loading coils, pair gain, electric fences (usually in rural locations), and digital loop carriers can also slow connections to 20 kbit/s or lower.
The pair gain unit which performs the multiplexing can simply provide a second telephone connection over a single subscriber line (called an Analog Multi-Line Carrier or AML) in circumstances where a customer wants to add a new phone line for a fax machine or dial-up internet connection.

Phantasy Star Online

Phantasy Star Online Episode I & IIPhantasy Star Online Ver. 2Phantasy Star Online (Japan)
Video games released from the mid-1990s to the mid-2000s that utilized Internet access such as EverQuest, Red Faction, Warcraft 3, Final Fantasy XI, Phantasy Star Online, Guild Wars, Unreal Tournament, Halo: Combat Evolved, Audition, Quake 3: Arena, Starsiege: Tribes and Ragnarok Online, etc., accommodated for 56k dial-up with limited data transfer between the game servers and user's personal computer.
As Japanese Internet service providers charged for dial-up access per minute, and high-speed connections were not yet widely available, Okawa personally paid for free Internet access bundled with Japanese Dreamcasts.

Satellite Internet access

satellite internetsatellitesatellite broadband
Broadband Internet access via cable, digital subscriber line, satellite and FTTx has replaced dial-up access in many parts of the world.
Globalstar also provides Internet access at 9600 bit/s—like Iridium and ACeS a dial-up connection is required and is billed per minute, however both Globalstar and Iridium are planning to launch new satellites offering always-on data services at higher rates.

Rural Internet

broadband Internet to rural areasruralrural areas
Because telephone access is widely available, dial-up is often the only choice available for rural or remote areas, where broadband installations are not prevalent due to low population density and high infrastructure cost.

V.92

Modern dial-up modems typically have a maximum theoretical transfer speed of 56 kbit/s (using the [[List of ITU-T V-series recommendations#Simultaneous transmission of data and other signals|V.90]] or V.92 protocol), although in most cases, 40–50 kbit/s is the norm.

PlayStation 2

PS2Sony PlayStation 2PlayStation
The first consoles to provide Internet connectivity, the Dreamcast and PlayStation 2, supported dial-up as well as broadband.
PlayStation 2 users had the option to play select games over the Internet, using dial-up or a broadband Internet connection.

Electric fence

electric fencingelectric fenceselectric
Other factors such as long loops, loading coils, pair gain, electric fences (usually in rural locations), and digital loop carriers can also slow connections to 20 kbit/s or lower.
Poorly designed or badly maintained electric fences can create sufficient electromagnetic interference to cause problems for nearby telephone, radio, and television reception - and has been a particular problem for dial-up Internet users in some rural areas.

Bell 212A

Bell 212
The Bell 212A scheme was the most common standard used for 1200 baud transmission on US data networks such as CompuServe during the period that dial-up Internet access was the norm (1980s and 1990s).

Public switched telephone network

PSTNpublic telephone networktelephone network
Dial-up Internet access is a form of Internet access that uses the facilities of the public switched telephone network (PSTN) to establish a connection to an Internet service provider (ISP) by dialing a telephone number on a conventional telephone line.

Telephone number

phone numbertelephone numbersphone numbers
Dial-up Internet access is a form of Internet access that uses the facilities of the public switched telephone network (PSTN) to establish a connection to an Internet service provider (ISP) by dialing a telephone number on a conventional telephone line.

Telephone line

phone linelinetelephone cable
Dial-up Internet access is a form of Internet access that uses the facilities of the public switched telephone network (PSTN) to establish a connection to an Internet service provider (ISP) by dialing a telephone number on a conventional telephone line.

Router (computing)

routerroutersnetwork router
Dial-up connections use modems to decode audio signals into data to send to a router or computer, and to encode signals from the latter two devices to send to another modem.

Tom Truscott

In 1979, Tom Truscott and Steve Bellovin, graduates of Duke University, created an early predecessor to dial-up Internet access called the USENET.

Steven M. Bellovin

Steve BellovinSteven Bellovin
In 1979, Tom Truscott and Steve Bellovin, graduates of Duke University, created an early predecessor to dial-up Internet access called the USENET.

Duke University

DukeTrinity CollegeDU
In 1979, Tom Truscott and Steve Bellovin, graduates of Duke University, created an early predecessor to dial-up Internet access called the USENET.

Unix

UNIX operating systemAT&T UnixUnix-like
The USENET was a UNIX based system that used a dial-up connection to transfer data through telephone modems.

National Science Foundation Network

NSFNETNSFsituation was confused
Dial-up Internet has been around since the 1980s via public providers such as NSFNET-linked universities.

BBC

British Broadcasting Corporationthe BBCBBC Music
The BBC established Internet access via Brunel University in the United Kingdom in 1989.

Pipex

Pipex.comUUNET/PIPEX
Dial-up was first offered commercially in 1992 by Pipex in the United Kingdom and Sprint in the United States.

Sprint Corporation

SprintSprint NextelSprint Nextel Corporation
Dial-up was first offered commercially in 1992 by Pipex in the United Kingdom and Sprint in the United States.