Diastole

diastolicdiastolic pressurerelaxationcardiac diastolic functiondiastolic blood pressurediastolic fillingdiastolic phaseheart relaxesin the period between contractionsventricular relaxation period
For the Greek punctuation mark sometimes known as the diastole, see Hypodiastole.wikipedia
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Atrium (heart)

right atriumatrialeft atrium
Ventricular diastole is the period during which the two ventricles are relaxing from the contortions/wringing of contraction, then dilating and filling; atrial diastole is the period during which the two atria likewise are relaxing under suction, dilating, and filling.
The atria receive blood while relaxed (diastole), then contract (systole) to move blood to the ventricles.

Cardiac cycle

heartbeatheart beatventricular systole
Diastole is the part of the cardiac cycle during which the heart refills with blood after the emptying done during systole (contraction). Here the adjective "diastolic" refers to the function (the "diastolic function") of filling the heart with blood between muscle contractions; it describes that portion of the cardiac cycle opposite to contraction.
It consists of two periods: one during which the heart muscle relaxes and refills with blood, called diastole, followed by a period of robust contraction and pumping of blood, dubbed systole.

Mitral valve

mitralbicuspid valvemitral annulus
When pressure in the left ventricle falls below that in the left atrium the mitral valve opens due to a negative pressure differential (suction) between the two chambers, causing blood in the atrium (accumulated during atrial diastole) to flow into the ventricle (see graphic at top).
In normal conditions, blood flows through an open mitral valve during diastole with contraction of the left atrium, and the mitral valve closes during systole with contraction of the left ventricle.

Ventricle (heart)

ventricleleft ventricleright ventricle
Ventricular diastole is the period during which the two ventricles are relaxing from the contortions/wringing of contraction, then dilating and filling; atrial diastole is the period during which the two atria likewise are relaxing under suction, dilating, and filling.
During diastole, the ventricles relax and fill with blood again.

Tricuspid valve

tricuspidtricuspid valvesheart
Likewise, the same phenomenon runs simultaneously in the right ventricle and right atrium through the tricuspid valve.
Tricuspid regurgitation can result in increased ventricular preload because the blood refluxed back into the atrium is added to the volume of blood that must be pumped back into the ventricle during the next cycle of ventricular diastole.

E/A ratio

pseudonormal E/A
The E/A ratio is used as a diagnostic measure as its diminishment indicates probable diastolic dysfunction.
Abnormalities in the E/A ratio suggest that the left ventricle, which pumps blood into the circulation, cannot fill with blood properly in the period between contractions.

Blood pressure

systolic blood pressurediastolic blood pressurearterial blood pressure
The term is more commonly known as one of the two main components for measuring blood pressure—namely, "diastolic pressure" refers to the lowest pressure in the arterial bloodstream occurring during each heartbeat.
Blood pressure is usually expressed in terms of the systolic pressure (maximum during one heartbeat) over diastolic pressure (minimum in between two heartbeats) and is measured in millimeters of mercury (mmHg), above the surrounding atmospheric pressure.

Systole

systolicsystolic pressureventricular systole
Diastole is the part of the cardiac cycle during which the heart refills with blood after the emptying done during systole (contraction).
When, in late ventricular diastole, the atrial chambers contract, they send blood down to the larger, lower ventricle chambers.

Heart

cardiachuman heartapex of the heart
Here the adjective "diastolic" refers to the function (the "diastolic function") of filling the heart with blood between muscle contractions; it describes that portion of the cardiac cycle opposite to contraction.
The period of time during which the ventricles contract, forcing blood out into the aorta and main pulmonary artery, is known as systole, while the period during which the ventricles relax and refill with blood is known as diastole.

Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction

diastolic dysfunctiondiastolic heart failureDiasatolic dysfunction
The E/A ratio is used as a diagnostic measure as its diminishment indicates probable diastolic dysfunction. Examining diastolic function during a cardiac stress test is a good way to test for heart failure with preserved ejection fraction.
HFpEF is characterized by abnormal diastolic function: there is an increase in the stiffness of the left ventricle, which causes a decrease in left ventricular relaxation during diastole, with resultant increased pressure and/or impaired filling.

Diastolic function

Here the adjective "diastolic" refers to the function (the "diastolic function") of filling the heart with blood between muscle contractions; it describes that portion of the cardiac cycle opposite to contraction.
During diastole, the ventricle of heart must remain elastic or compliant enough and have capacity to hold incoming blood to guarantee effectiveness of the filling phase.

End-diastolic volume

end diastolic volumeend-diastolicGEDV
This will result in a reduced end diastolic volume (EDV) and, according to the Frank-Starling mechanism, a reduced EDV will lead to a reduced stroke volume, thus a reduced cardiac output.
In cardiovascular physiology, end-diastolic volume (EDV) is the volume of blood in the right and/or left ventricle at end load or filling in (diastole) or the amount of blood in the ventricles just before systole.

Stroke volume

heart muscle contraction forcestroke work (SW).volume
This will result in a reduced end diastolic volume (EDV) and, according to the Frank-Starling mechanism, a reduced EDV will lead to a reduced stroke volume, thus a reduced cardiac output.
Reduced heart rate prolongs ventricular diastole (filling), increasing end-diastolic volume, and ultimately allowing more blood to be ejected.

Venae cavae

vena cavavena cavaevenæ cavæ
The atria are filling with separate blood volumes returning to the right atrium (from the vena cavae) and to the left atrium (from the lungs).

Ejection fraction

left ventricular ejection fractionLVEFejected
As pressures within the ventricles continue to rise, they exceed the 'back pressures' in the aorta trunk and the pulmonary arteries trunk, and the aortic and pulmonary valves open—and now blood is ejected from the heart.

Muscle contraction

contractionmuscular contractionexcitation-contraction coupling
Here the adjective "diastolic" refers to the function (the "diastolic function") of filling the heart with blood between muscle contractions; it describes that portion of the cardiac cycle opposite to contraction.

Slash (punctuation)

slash/solidus
When blood pressure is stated for medical purposes, it is usually written with the systolic and diastolic pressures separated by a slash, for example, 120/80 mmHg.

Torr

mmHgmm Hgmillimeters of mercury
When blood pressure is stated for medical purposes, it is usually written with the systolic and diastolic pressures separated by a slash, for example, 120/80 mmHg.

Heart rate

heartbeatresting heart ratemaximum heart rate
It is often shown followed by a third number, the value of the heart rate (in beats per minute), which typically is measured jointly with blood pressure readings.

Cardiac stress test

exercise stress teststress testcardiac stress tests
Examining diastolic function during a cardiac stress test is a good way to test for heart failure with preserved ejection fraction.

Brain natriuretic peptide

BNPB-type natriuretic peptideB-type Natriuretic Peptide (BNP)
Brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) is a cardiac neurohormone secreted from ventricular myocytes (ventricular muscle cells) at the end of diastole—this in response to the normal, or sub-normal (as the case may be), stretching of cardiomyocytes (heart muscle cells) during systole.

Neurohormone

neurohormonesneurohormonalneuro-hormonal
Brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) is a cardiac neurohormone secreted from ventricular myocytes (ventricular muscle cells) at the end of diastole—this in response to the normal, or sub-normal (as the case may be), stretching of cardiomyocytes (heart muscle cells) during systole.

Natriuresis

natriureticnatriuretic peptidesantinatriuretic
Elevated levels of BNP indicate excessive natriuresis (excretion of sodium to the urine) and decline of ventricular function, especially during diastole.

Frank–Starling law

Frank–Starling law of the heartFrank-Starling mechanismFrank–Starling mechanism
This will result in a reduced end diastolic volume (EDV) and, according to the Frank-Starling mechanism, a reduced EDV will lead to a reduced stroke volume, thus a reduced cardiac output.