Dick Hustvedt

Richard "Dick" Irvin Hustvedt (February 18, 1946 – April 15, 2008) was a renowned software engineer, designer and developer of several operating systems including Digital Equipment Corporation's RSX-11, and VMS.wikipedia
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OpenVMS

VMSVAX/VMSOpenVMS AXP
Richard "Dick" Irvin Hustvedt (February 18, 1946 – April 15, 2008) was a renowned software engineer, designer and developer of several operating systems including Digital Equipment Corporation's RSX-11, and VMS. Dick Hustvedt was one of the three principal designers of VMS, along with Dave Cutler and Peter Lipman. The OpenVMS development team, now part of Hewlett-Packard, named a conference room in his honor in Nashua, New Hampshire facility.
Roger Gourd was the project lead for the Starlet program, with software engineers Dave Cutler (who would later lead development of Microsoft's Windows NT), Dick Hustvedt, and Peter Lipman acting as the technical project leaders, each having responsibility for a different area of the operating system.

Dave Cutler

David N. Cutler
Dick Hustvedt was one of the three principal designers of VMS, along with Dave Cutler and Peter Lipman.
In June 1975, Cutler, together with Dick Hustvedt and Peter Lipman, were appointed the technical project leaders for the software project, code-named Starlet, to develop a totally new operating system for the Star family of processors.

Software engineer

engineersSoftware Engineersarchitect
Richard "Dick" Irvin Hustvedt (February 18, 1946 – April 15, 2008) was a renowned software engineer, designer and developer of several operating systems including Digital Equipment Corporation's RSX-11, and VMS.

Digital Equipment Corporation

DECDigitalDigital Equipment Corporation (DEC)
Richard "Dick" Irvin Hustvedt (February 18, 1946 – April 15, 2008) was a renowned software engineer, designer and developer of several operating systems including Digital Equipment Corporation's RSX-11, and VMS. He was recruited by Ken Olsen to join Digital Equipment Corporation (DEC) in 1974.

RSX-11

IASRSXRSX-11M
Richard "Dick" Irvin Hustvedt (February 18, 1946 – April 15, 2008) was a renowned software engineer, designer and developer of several operating systems including Digital Equipment Corporation's RSX-11, and VMS.

Aberdeen, South Dakota

AberdeenAberdeen, SDAberdeen, Dakota Territory
Hustvedt was born in Aberdeen, South Dakota and grew up in Radcliff, Kentucky, home of Fort Knox.

Radcliff, Kentucky

RadcliffRadcliff, Hardin County, KentuckyRadcliff, KY
Hustvedt was born in Aberdeen, South Dakota and grew up in Radcliff, Kentucky, home of Fort Knox.

Fort Knox

Fort Knox, KentuckyCamp KnoxFt. Knox
Hustvedt was born in Aberdeen, South Dakota and grew up in Radcliff, Kentucky, home of Fort Knox.

University of California, Berkeley

BerkeleyUC BerkeleyUniversity of California
He attended the University of California, Berkeley studying computer science and was later employed by the Army Security Agency.

Computer science

computer scientistcomputer sciencescomputer scientists
He attended the University of California, Berkeley studying computer science and was later employed by the Army Security Agency.

United States Army Security Agency

Army Security Agency403rd Radio Research Special Operations DetachmentArmy Security Agency Group
He attended the University of California, Berkeley studying computer science and was later employed by the Army Security Agency.

Xerox

Xerox CorporationHaloid CompanyXerox Corp.
Following the ASA, Dick worked for the Xerox Corporation on the development of operating systems for their Data Systems division (Xerox DSD Development Programming in El Segundo, California), and was a principal kernel developer of the Xerox Data Systems (XDS) RAD-75, RBM-1 and CP-V operating systems.

El Segundo, California

El SegundoEl Segundo, CA El Segundo
Following the ASA, Dick worked for the Xerox Corporation on the development of operating systems for their Data Systems division (Xerox DSD Development Programming in El Segundo, California), and was a principal kernel developer of the Xerox Data Systems (XDS) RAD-75, RBM-1 and CP-V operating systems.

Scientific Data Systems

SDSXDSScientific Data Systems (SDS)
Following the ASA, Dick worked for the Xerox Corporation on the development of operating systems for their Data Systems division (Xerox DSD Development Programming in El Segundo, California), and was a principal kernel developer of the Xerox Data Systems (XDS) RAD-75, RBM-1 and CP-V operating systems.

Ken Olsen

Kenneth H. OlsenOlsen, Kenneth
He was recruited by Ken Olsen to join Digital Equipment Corporation (DEC) in 1974.

Los Angeles

Los Angeles, CaliforniaLos Angeles, CALA
He moved from Los Angeles, California to Concord, Massachusetts where he worked at the company headquarters at "The Mill" in Maynard, Massachusetts.

Concord, Massachusetts

ConcordConcord, MATown of Concord
He moved from Los Angeles, California to Concord, Massachusetts where he worked at the company headquarters at "The Mill" in Maynard, Massachusetts.

Maynard, Massachusetts

MaynardAssabetTown of Maynard
He moved from Los Angeles, California to Concord, Massachusetts where he worked at the company headquarters at "The Mill" in Maynard, Massachusetts.

Acton, Massachusetts

ActonSouth ActonActon, MA
On January 13, 1984, he suffered a severe head injury in an automobile accident in Acton, Massachusetts.

New Hampshire

NHState of New HampshireNew Hampshire, U.S.
He resided in New Hampshire at the time of his death on April 15, 2008.

Hewlett-Packard

HPHewlett PackardHewlett-Packard Company
The OpenVMS development team, now part of Hewlett-Packard, named a conference room in his honor in Nashua, New Hampshire facility.

Nashua, New Hampshire

NashuaNashua, NHcity
The OpenVMS development team, now part of Hewlett-Packard, named a conference room in his honor in Nashua, New Hampshire facility.

32-bit

32-32 bit32
VMS was first conceived in 1976 as the operating system for the 32-bit, virtual memory line of computers eventually named VAX.

Virtual memory

virtual storagememoryswap
VMS was first conceived in 1976 as the operating system for the 32-bit, virtual memory line of computers eventually named VAX.

VAX

DEC VAXVAX 11/780DEC VAX ULTRIX
VMS was first conceived in 1976 as the operating system for the 32-bit, virtual memory line of computers eventually named VAX.